Discussion:
Safest Places in the US?
(too old to reply)
John
2006-04-09 01:02:23 UTC
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?

When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?

If for example I wanted to live in the USA, I don't think it would be
a good idea for me to choose Arizona because I have skin that easily
burns. I also wouldn't want to choose somewhere like Maine or
Minnesota where it might be freezing a lot of the time.

I also just had a question about home construction in the US. Whenever
I see images on television of the damage from Tornados and Hurricanes
etc, a lot of the homes that have suffered damage or have been
completely destroyed, it seems that they are mainly constructed of
timber. I don't understand why so many homes in the US especially in
areas were you get a lot of Hurricanes and Tornados at certain times
of the year are constructed of timber. Surely it would be better if
they were constructed of something more solid like big stone?

I have been watching some of the devastation on the news in paces like
Tennessee from the recent tornados. I have also been in the middle of
a Hurricane (Fran) once when I was on holiday in the US and visiting
friends in North Carolina back in 1996 so have seen first hand the
damage that can be done. I have also witnessed massive hailstones that
fell in Pennsylvania when I worked there, and saw all the smashed
windscreens on cars afterwards.

I just wondered what the opinion is of people who work in the
construction industry. Would it help if homes were built of different
materials to timber?

I am also thinking there must be some type of material that can be
used to make car windscreens (windshields) that wouldn't smash if hit
by large hailstone? Maybe some sort of see through plastic/rubber that
the hailstone would just bounce off instead of smashing through? If we
can make bulletproof cars surely making a windscreen that doesn't
smash is also possible?

If you have any suggestions for some relatively safe states in the US
I would be very interested to know.

I am guessing that much of the south and south east can be ruled out
for the Hurricanes and the middle of the country for tornados. The
Western seaboard for the fault line. Places like Texas, Arizona,
Nevada, Southern California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida for the
heat. The North, NW and NE for the freezing temperatures, so that will
remove states like Alaska, Washington, Montana, N&S Dakota, Minnesota,
Wisconsin, Michigan, New York, Maine etc. See my rough map. I'm not
sure if I've done a good job of getting roughly the right areas for
the danger spots? http://tinyurl.com/nt3vm

What's left? Oregon? Hawaii?

John
David Bennetts
2006-04-09 01:39:37 UTC
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?
If for example I wanted to live in the USA, I don't think it would be
a good idea for me to choose Arizona because I have skin that easily
burns. I also wouldn't want to choose somewhere like Maine or
Minnesota where it might be freezing a lot of the time.
I also just had a question about home construction in the US. Whenever
I see images on television of the damage from Tornados and Hurricanes
etc, a lot of the homes that have suffered damage or have been
completely destroyed, it seems that they are mainly constructed of
timber. I don't understand why so many homes in the US especially in
areas were you get a lot of Hurricanes and Tornados at certain times
of the year are constructed of timber. Surely it would be better if
they were constructed of something more solid like big stone?
I have been watching some of the devastation on the news in paces like
Tennessee from the recent tornados. I have also been in the middle of
a Hurricane (Fran) once when I was on holiday in the US and visiting
friends in North Carolina back in 1996 so have seen first hand the
damage that can be done. I have also witnessed massive hailstones that
fell in Pennsylvania when I worked there, and saw all the smashed
windscreens on cars afterwards.
I just wondered what the opinion is of people who work in the
construction industry. Would it help if homes were built of different
materials to timber?
I am also thinking there must be some type of material that can be
used to make car windscreens (windshields) that wouldn't smash if hit
by large hailstone? Maybe some sort of see through plastic/rubber that
the hailstone would just bounce off instead of smashing through? If we
can make bulletproof cars surely making a windscreen that doesn't
smash is also possible?
If you have any suggestions for some relatively safe states in the US
I would be very interested to know.
I am guessing that much of the south and south east can be ruled out
for the Hurricanes and the middle of the country for tornados. The
Western seaboard for the fault line. Places like Texas, Arizona,
Nevada, Southern California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida for the
heat. The North, NW and NE for the freezing temperatures, so that will
remove states like Alaska, Washington, Montana, N&S Dakota, Minnesota,
Wisconsin, Michigan, New York, Maine etc. See my rough map. I'm not
sure if I've done a good job of getting roughly the right areas for
the danger spots? http://tinyurl.com/nt3vm
What's left? Oregon? Hawaii?
John
Rule those out - Oregon has too many forest fires and too many trees, you
might get burnt or a tree might fall on you. Hawaii has volcanoes and big
waves, either may kill you. I don't think there's anywhere left in the USA
for you. You'll have to emigrate.

Regards

David Bennetts
Australia
John
2006-04-09 15:53:33 UTC
Post by David Bennetts
Rule those out - Oregon has too many forest fires and too many trees, you
might get burnt or a tree might fall on you. Hawaii has volcanoes and big
waves, either may kill you. I don't think there's anywhere left in the USA
for you. You'll have to emigrate.
Regards
David Bennetts
Australia
I don't currently live in the States. I was just curious about what
parts of the US people consider to be the safest. I have worked there
for a short period of time and been on holiday and spent a fair amount
of time there.

I have also been on holiday to Australia twice. Sydney and Queensland
the first time, and Melbourne, Phillip Island and the Great Ocean Rd
the second time. I can also rule out Sydney for those fires as well,
plus those Funnel Webs Spiders and Sharks swimming up the
river ;)

I live in the UK, and am mainly just thinking about this for when I
retire (a long way off yet). But you never know, perhaps I may
emigrate to somewhere else from the UK.

John
Phil Scott
2006-04-16 21:39:21 UTC
Post by John
I live in the UK, and am mainly just thinking about this for
when I
retire (a long way off yet). But you never know, perhaps I
may
emigrate to somewhere else from the UK.
John
you lead a boring life John
Phil Scott
2006-04-16 21:38:02 UTC
--
Phil Scott
Ideas are bullet proof.
Post by David Bennetts
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being
some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers
such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes,
Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as
well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?
If for example I wanted to live in the USA, I don't think
it would be
a good idea for me to choose Arizona because I have skin
that easily
burns. I also wouldn't want to choose somewhere like Maine
or
Minnesota where it might be freezing a lot of the time.
I also just had a question about home construction in the
US. Whenever
I see images on television of the damage from Tornados and
Hurricanes
etc, a lot of the homes that have suffered damage or have
been
completely destroyed, it seems that they are mainly
constructed of
timber. I don't understand why so many homes in the US
especially in
areas were you get a lot of Hurricanes and Tornados at
certain times
of the year are constructed of timber. Surely it would be
better if
they were constructed of something more solid like big
stone?
I have been watching some of the devastation on the news in
paces like
Tennessee from the recent tornados. I have also been in the
middle of
a Hurricane (Fran) once when I was on holiday in the US and
visiting
friends in North Carolina back in 1996 so have seen first
hand the
damage that can be done. I have also witnessed massive
hailstones that
fell in Pennsylvania when I worked there, and saw all the
smashed
windscreens on cars afterwards.
I just wondered what the opinion is of people who work in
the
construction industry. Would it help if homes were built of
different
materials to timber?
I am also thinking there must be some type of material that
can be
used to make car windscreens (windshields) that wouldn't
smash if hit
by large hailstone? Maybe some sort of see through
plastic/rubber that
the hailstone would just bounce off instead of smashing
through? If we
can make bulletproof cars surely making a windscreen that
doesn't
smash is also possible?
If you have any suggestions for some relatively safe states
in the US
I would be very interested to know.
I am guessing that much of the south and south east can be
ruled out
for the Hurricanes and the middle of the country for
tornados. The
Western seaboard for the fault line. Places like Texas,
Arizona,
Nevada, Southern California, Louisiana, Mississippi,
Florida for the
heat. The North, NW and NE for the freezing temperatures,
so that will
remove states like Alaska, Washington, Montana, N&S Dakota,
Minnesota,
Wisconsin, Michigan, New York, Maine etc. See my rough map.
I'm not
sure if I've done a good job of getting roughly the right
areas for
the danger spots? http://tinyurl.com/nt3vm
What's left? Oregon? Hawaii?
John
Rule those out - Oregon has too many forest fires and too
many trees, you
might get burnt or a tree might fall on you. Hawaii has
volcanoes and big
waves, either may kill you. I don't think there's anywhere
left in the USA
for you. You'll have to emigrate.
Regards
David Bennetts
Australia
Good thinking...also in the US there are all kinds of bugs,
snakes, and dangerous animals..any of those could **attack**
and often do, thousands die every year from that and hookers
gone out of control.

One of the most dangerous places in the US though is Oakland
Calif. particularly some parts, the highest murder rate in
the US some years, and some spots directly on major earthquake
fault lines... with 2 million people in the general vicinity
and 200 a year dying from these sorts things, the odds one
will suffer (gasp) are 2 in 100,000... Unless you are not
black, then the odds are about one in 200,000.

On the other hand, anal retentiveness will increase the OP's
odds of dying of a heart attack 500%..
Sue
2006-04-16 21:58:17 UTC
On Sun, 16 Apr 2006 14:38:02 -0700, "Phil Scott"
Post by Phil Scott
One of the most dangerous places in the US though is Oakland
Calif. particularly some parts, the highest murder rate in
the US some years, and some spots directly on major earthquake
fault lines... with 2 million people in the general vicinity
and 200 a year dying from these sorts things, the odds one
will suffer (gasp) are 2 in 100,000... Unless you are not
black, then the odds are about one in 200,000.
Geeze. I'm lucky I got out of there alive!!!
Sue
Antipodean Bucket Farmer
2006-04-16 22:41:24 UTC
Post by Sue
On Sun, 16 Apr 2006 14:38:02 -0700, "Phil Scott"
Post by Phil Scott
One of the most dangerous places in the US though is Oakland
Calif. particularly some parts, the highest murder rate in
the US some years, and some spots directly on major earthquake
fault lines... with 2 million people in the general vicinity
and 200 a year dying from these sorts things, the odds one
will suffer (gasp) are 2 in 100,000... Unless you are not
black, then the odds are about one in 200,000.
Geeze. I'm lucky I got out of there alive!!!
While anyone can be murdered, there is plenty that you can do to
reduce your risk.

The main thing is NOT doing any illegal drugs (including pot),
and refusing any personal "friendship" with anyone who is doing
them. Same with other types of crime.

Stay out of abusive sexual relationships, and platonic
"friendships."

Stay away from parasites who want to use you for money, a place
to live, food, etc, since they may become violent when you get
tired of it, and refuse.

Stay away from anyone with severe mental health issues.

You may have to (or choose to) live in a bad neighbourhood for
financial reasons, so would have a higher general environmental
risk.

But lots of victims of murder (and other violence) are attacked
by sex-partners, "friends," or acquaintances. Such contacts are
also a major point of theft and other material/financial
problems. And they are something which is under your own
control, as far as avoidance.

And, even in a nicer neighbourhood, don't get complacent - you
will still occasionally encounter drug users and nutcases.
--
Want Freebies?
http://www.TheFreeStuffList.com/
Check The Free Stuff List
R'zenboom
2006-04-17 17:00:33 UTC
Post by Antipodean Bucket Farmer
Post by Sue
On Sun, 16 Apr 2006 14:38:02 -0700, "Phil Scott"
Post by Phil Scott
One of the most dangerous places in the US though is Oakland
Calif. particularly some parts, the highest murder rate in
the US some years, and some spots directly on major earthquake
fault lines... with 2 million people in the general vicinity
and 200 a year dying from these sorts things, the odds one
will suffer (gasp) are 2 in 100,000... Unless you are not
black, then the odds are about one in 200,000.
Geeze. I'm lucky I got out of there alive!!!
While anyone can be murdered, there is plenty that you can do to
reduce your risk.
The main thing is NOT doing any illegal drugs (including pot),
and refusing any personal "friendship" with anyone who is doing
them. Same with other types of crime.
Stay out of abusive sexual relationships, and platonic
"friendships."
Stay away from parasites who want to use you for money, a place
to live, food, etc, since they may become violent when you get
tired of it, and refuse.
Stay away from anyone with severe mental health issues.
You may have to (or choose to) live in a bad neighbourhood for
financial reasons, so would have a higher general environmental
risk.
But lots of victims of murder (and other violence) are attacked
by sex-partners, "friends," or acquaintances. Such contacts are
also a major point of theft and other material/financial
problems. And they are something which is under your own
control, as far as avoidance.
And, even in a nicer neighbourhood, don't get complacent - you
will still occasionally encounter drug users and nutcases.
Truely, good points.

However, please re-assure us that these are not the cause of your antipodean
farming lifestyle! :)

--
R'zenboom
clintonG
2006-04-09 01:40:12 UTC
You may be interested in what Joel Skousen has written and talks about [1].

<%= Clinton Gallagher
NET csgallagher AT metromilwaukee.com
URL http://clintongallagher.metromilwaukee.com/

[1] http://www.joelskousen.com/
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?
If for example I wanted to live in the USA, I don't think it would be
a good idea for me to choose Arizona because I have skin that easily
burns. I also wouldn't want to choose somewhere like Maine or
Minnesota where it might be freezing a lot of the time.
I also just had a question about home construction in the US. Whenever
I see images on television of the damage from Tornados and Hurricanes
etc, a lot of the homes that have suffered damage or have been
completely destroyed, it seems that they are mainly constructed of
timber. I don't understand why so many homes in the US especially in
areas were you get a lot of Hurricanes and Tornados at certain times
of the year are constructed of timber. Surely it would be better if
they were constructed of something more solid like big stone?
I have been watching some of the devastation on the news in paces like
Tennessee from the recent tornados. I have also been in the middle of
a Hurricane (Fran) once when I was on holiday in the US and visiting
friends in North Carolina back in 1996 so have seen first hand the
damage that can be done. I have also witnessed massive hailstones that
fell in Pennsylvania when I worked there, and saw all the smashed
windscreens on cars afterwards.
I just wondered what the opinion is of people who work in the
construction industry. Would it help if homes were built of different
materials to timber?
I am also thinking there must be some type of material that can be
used to make car windscreens (windshields) that wouldn't smash if hit
by large hailstone? Maybe some sort of see through plastic/rubber that
the hailstone would just bounce off instead of smashing through? If we
can make bulletproof cars surely making a windscreen that doesn't
smash is also possible?
If you have any suggestions for some relatively safe states in the US
I would be very interested to know.
I am guessing that much of the south and south east can be ruled out
for the Hurricanes and the middle of the country for tornados. The
Western seaboard for the fault line. Places like Texas, Arizona,
Nevada, Southern California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida for the
heat. The North, NW and NE for the freezing temperatures, so that will
remove states like Alaska, Washington, Montana, N&S Dakota, Minnesota,
Wisconsin, Michigan, New York, Maine etc. See my rough map. I'm not
sure if I've done a good job of getting roughly the right areas for
the danger spots? http://tinyurl.com/nt3vm
What's left? Oregon? Hawaii?
John
John
2006-04-09 15:53:56 UTC
On Sun, 09 Apr 2006 01:40:12 GMT, "clintonG"
Post by clintonG
You may be interested in what Joel Skousen has written and talks about [1].
<%= Clinton Gallagher
NET csgallagher AT metromilwaukee.com
URL http://clintongallagher.metromilwaukee.com/
[1] http://www.joelskousen.com/
Thanks for that link. It is a very interesting site.

I think a lot of it mainly centres on safe places away from Nuclear
targets. A lot of those places that the site lists some are in the
North in areas where it gets really cold; Boise ID, Provo-Orem UT,
Grand Rapids MI. There's one in Oregon where someone mentions that
there are forest fires. One in California. I'm not sure though
whether Santa Rosa is near the fault line and will suffer from
Earthquakes or Wild Fires? One place in Texas and Nevada, which would
probably be too hot for me. Then you have others in the Hurricane
belt, North and South Carolina.

John
Hatunen
2006-04-09 23:56:41 UTC
Post by John
I think a lot of it mainly centres on safe places away from Nuclear
targets. A lot of those places that the site lists some are in the
North in areas where it gets really cold; Boise ID, Provo-Orem UT,
Grand Rapids MI. There's one in Oregon where someone mentions that
there are forest fires. One in California. I'm not sure though
whether Santa Rosa is near the fault line and will suffer from
Earthquakes or Wild Fires?
Santa Rosa was devastated by the 1906 earthquake. It has also
been subject to other earthquakes. See
http://nisee.berkeley.edu/elibrary/index.html and search for
santa rosa

The city of Santa Rosa proper is unlikely to suffer from
wildfires, but it is in a valley surrounded by brushy mountains,
so be careful if looking for suburban living.


************* DAVE HATUNEN (***@cox.net) *************
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
* My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
Weatherlawyer
2006-04-09 02:55:13 UTC
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
I think the 4 horsemen of the feckuplyss are pretty well covering
Chimpzillandwana at the moment.

Come to Britain: http://www.werenotafraid.com/images/765/index.html
DT
2006-04-09 03:53:09 UTC
In article <***@4ax.com>, ***@Sam.com
says...
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
Ohio. No deadly creatures, either. Some cold weather, but the southern part of
the state is much warmer than along Lake Erie where I live. Very affordable
housing. Jobs. Ohio.

--
Dennis
pltrgyst
2006-04-09 05:19:26 UTC
.... Jobs. Ohio.
Really? There seem to be a lot of unemployed Ohioans complaining about the job
situation on Usenet. Not as bas as West Virginia, but they make it sound close.

-- Larry
Gunner
2006-04-09 18:53:24 UTC
Post by DT
says...
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
Ohio. No deadly creatures, either. Some cold weather, but the southern part of
the state is much warmer than along Lake Erie where I live. Very affordable
housing. Jobs. Ohio.
New Madrid Fault is expected to go off anytime now

Gunner

"I think this is because of your belief in biological Marxism.
As a genetic communist you feel that noticing behavioural
patterns relating to race would cause a conflict with your belief
in biological Marxism." Big Pete, famous Usenet Racist
Hatunen
2006-04-09 23:42:38 UTC
Post by Gunner
Post by DT
says...
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
Ohio. No deadly creatures, either. Some cold weather, but the southern part of
the state is much warmer than along Lake Erie where I live. Very affordable
housing. Jobs. Ohio.
New Madrid Fault is expected to go off anytime now
Even a major earthquake on the New Madrid Fault is unlikely to
cause any serious damage in Ohio.

************* DAVE HATUNEN (***@cox.net) *************
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
* My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
Gunner
2006-04-10 04:41:52 UTC
Post by Hatunen
Post by Gunner
Post by DT
says...
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
Ohio. No deadly creatures, either. Some cold weather, but the southern part of
the state is much warmer than along Lake Erie where I live. Very affordable
housing. Jobs. Ohio.
New Madrid Fault is expected to go off anytime now
Even a major earthquake on the New Madrid Fault is unlikely to
cause any serious damage in Ohio.
Thats odd..did they recently move Ohio?

http://www.dnr.state.oh.us/geosurvey/oh_geol/98_winter/visitor.htm

http://www.eas.slu.edu/Earthquake_Center/SEISMICITY/cus1800-1983.html

http://www.greatdreams.com/madrid.htm
Post by Hatunen
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
* My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
"I think this is because of your belief in biological Marxism.
As a genetic communist you feel that noticing behavioural
patterns relating to race would cause a conflict with your belief
in biological Marxism." Big Pete, famous Usenet Racist
Hatunen
2006-04-10 16:34:56 UTC
Post by Gunner
Post by Hatunen
Post by Gunner
Post by DT
says...
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
Ohio. No deadly creatures, either. Some cold weather, but the southern part of
the state is much warmer than along Lake Erie where I live. Very affordable
housing. Jobs. Ohio.
New Madrid Fault is expected to go off anytime now
Even a major earthquake on the New Madrid Fault is unlikely to
cause any serious damage in Ohio.
Thats odd..did they recently move Ohio?
Note the phrase "SERIOUS damage" [emphasis added] and the word
"unlikely". I know how to waffle with the best of them.
Post by Gunner
http://www.dnr.state.oh.us/geosurvey/oh_geol/98_winter/visitor.htm
http://www.eas.slu.edu/Earthquake_Center/SEISMICITY/cus1800-1983.html
http://www.greatdreams.com/madrid.htm
And the New Madrid quakes supposedly rang bells in Boston and
shook own some scaffolding in Washington, DC. I suppose, too,
that northeast Ohio is better than southwest Ohio.

The maps at Sue Hough's web pages at
http://pasadena.wr.usgs.gov/office/hough/Shake.html are also of
interest. Sue has quite a bit of info on the New Madrid shakes,
http://pasadena.wr.usgs.gov/office/hough/page.nm.html that ought
to scare t he Hell out of anyone living in St Louis or Memphis or
that general area.

I survived the Loma Prieta quake, which didn't even shake down my
shampoo bottle perched on the top of the shower partition. Of
course, our house wasn't built on bay silt or landfill from the
San Francisco worlds fair, good plaes to avoid even in Ohio.

On the other hand, I lived in Ohio for the first 23 years of my
life, and I saw the distant storm carrying a tornado that struck
Cleveland in the mid-1950s. Not to mention assorted tornado
damage in various parts of northeast Ohio, so as far as I'm
concerned it's not the New madrid Fault that makes Ohio a bad
place to live. Not to mention the best reason of all: it's better
to be FROM Ohio than living IN Ohio.




************* DAVE HATUNEN (***@cox.net) *************
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
* My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
Icono Clast
2006-04-11 11:51:13 UTC
Post by Hatunen
I survived the Loma Prieta quake, which didn't even shake down my
shampoo bottle perched on the top of the shower partition. Of
course, our house wasn't built on bay silt or landfill from the
San Francisco worlds fair, good plaes to avoid even in Ohio.
Nor, apparently, on the sand that Daly City was when I was a child.

That house of yours, and mine, are about equa-distant from the San
Andreas Fault. Almost everything was knocked over, much broken, in my
house. All the the houses on my, and nearby, blocks had the same
foundation-level cracks.
Post by Hatunen
Post by clintonG
Post by clintonG
check out "Lucifer's Hammer" (Niven, Pournelle), read it, and then
tell me you want to live around Ohio or anywhere else in the Midwest.
You'd make such an argument based on a work of FICTION?
It would depend on the accuracy of the data contained in the book.
Post by clintonG
Yes, the book Lucifer's Hammer is fiction and the story is about how
survivors react to a large scale cataclysmic event after a meteor strikes
the earth.
There's a similar book about San Francisco's Great 'Quake. The
story's fiction but the data aren't.
Post by Hatunen
Something to consider..is not how safe an area is from natural
disasters...but how well prepared the area/infrastructure for those
emergencies.
That's been mentioned by those talking about snow.

When the New Madrid Fault goes, it's going to be extremely bad as
they're not as 'Quake-conscious as we and are far less likely to have
built or prepared as wall as we.


-- ________________________________________________________________
A San Franciscan in 47.452 mile² San Francisco.
http://geocities.com/dancefest/ -<->- http://geocities.com/iconoc/
ICQ: http://wwp.mirabilis.com/19098103 -------> IClast at Gmail com






































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Robert
2006-04-09 22:43:28 UTC
Post by DT
says...
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
Ohio. No deadly creatures, either. Some cold weather, but the southern part of
the state is much warmer than along Lake Erie where I live. Very affordable
housing. Jobs. Ohio.
--
Dennis
Ohio = heat, humidity, flat, tornadoes

Robert
clintonG
2006-04-10 00:23:55 UTC
Its fiction and its an older book written in the 1970s but go the library
and check out "Lucifer's Hammer" (Niven, Pournelle), read it, and then tell
me you want to live around Ohio or anywhere else in the Midwest.

<%= Clinton Gallagher
NET csgallagher AT metromilwaukee.com
URL http://clintongallagher.metromilwaukee.com/
Post by DT
Post by DT
says...
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
Ohio. No deadly creatures, either. Some cold weather, but the southern
part of
Post by DT
the state is much warmer than along Lake Erie where I live. Very
affordable
Post by DT
housing. Jobs. Ohio.
--
Dennis
Ohio = heat, humidity, flat, tornadoes
Robert
Matt Barrow
2006-04-10 07:21:24 UTC
Post by clintonG
Its fiction and its an older book written in the 1970s but go the library
and check out "Lucifer's Hammer" (Niven, Pournelle), read it, and then
tell me you want to live around Ohio or anywhere else in the Midwest.
You'd make such an argument based on a work of FICTION?
Gunner
2006-04-10 10:34:33 UTC
On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 00:21:24 -0700, "Matt Barrow"
Post by Matt Barrow
Post by clintonG
Its fiction and its an older book written in the 1970s but go the library
and check out "Lucifer's Hammer" (Niven, Pournelle), read it, and then
tell me you want to live around Ohio or anywhere else in the Midwest.
You'd make such an argument based on a work of FICTION?
It would depend on the accuracy of the data contained in the book.

Gunner

"I think this is because of your belief in biological Marxism.
As a genetic communist you feel that noticing behavioural
patterns relating to race would cause a conflict with your belief
in biological Marxism." Big Pete, famous Usenet Racist
Matt Barrow
2006-04-10 12:55:53 UTC
Post by Gunner
On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 00:21:24 -0700, "Matt Barrow"
Post by Matt Barrow
Post by clintonG
Its fiction and its an older book written in the 1970s but go the library
and check out "Lucifer's Hammer" (Niven, Pournelle), read it, and then
tell me you want to live around Ohio or anywhere else in the Midwest.
You'd make such an argument based on a work of FICTION?
It would depend on the accuracy of the data contained in the book.
Fiction <--> data in book = ???
clintonG
2006-04-10 15:27:19 UTC
Yes, the book Lucifer's Hammer is fiction and the story is about how
survivors react to a large scale cataclysmic event after a meteor strikes
the earth.

The story is about police who won't or can't police anymore, neighbors who
are no longer neighborly, gangs, cannibalism and all of the other aspects of
social chaos that will emerge after a large scale cataclysmic event. Most of
all this book will compel the reader to pull their head out of their @ss
and think about the sociological factors one must consider as they are the
most considerable factors after all.


<%= Clinton Gallagher
Post by Matt Barrow
Post by Gunner
On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 00:21:24 -0700, "Matt Barrow"
Post by Matt Barrow
Post by clintonG
Its fiction and its an older book written in the 1970s but go the library
and check out "Lucifer's Hammer" (Niven, Pournelle), read it, and then
tell me you want to live around Ohio or anywhere else in the Midwest.
You'd make such an argument based on a work of FICTION?
It would depend on the accuracy of the data contained in the book.
Fiction <--> data in book = ???
Matt Barrow
2006-04-10 15:32:02 UTC
Post by clintonG
Yes, the book Lucifer's Hammer is fiction and the story is about how
survivors react to a large scale cataclysmic event after a meteor strikes
the earth.
The story is about police who won't or can't police anymore, neighbors who
are no longer neighborly, gangs, cannibalism and all of the other aspects
of social chaos that will emerge after a large scale cataclysmic event.
That sounds like Saturday night here in town!
Gunner
2006-04-10 17:30:08 UTC
On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 15:27:19 GMT, "clintonG"
Post by clintonG
Yes, the book Lucifer's Hammer is fiction and the story is about how
survivors react to a large scale cataclysmic event after a meteor strikes
the earth.
The story is about police who won't or can't police anymore, neighbors who
are no longer neighborly, gangs, cannibalism and all of the other aspects of
social chaos that will emerge after a large scale cataclysmic event. Most of
and think about the sociological factors one must consider as they are the
most considerable factors after all.
<%= Clinton Gallagher
Indeed. Well worth reading. Another, more dated one..is War Day.

Gunner
Post by clintonG
Post by Matt Barrow
Post by Gunner
On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 00:21:24 -0700, "Matt Barrow"
Post by Matt Barrow
Post by clintonG
Its fiction and its an older book written in the 1970s but go the library
and check out "Lucifer's Hammer" (Niven, Pournelle), read it, and then
tell me you want to live around Ohio or anywhere else in the Midwest.
You'd make such an argument based on a work of FICTION?
It would depend on the accuracy of the data contained in the book.
Fiction <--> data in book = ???
"I think this is because of your belief in biological Marxism.
As a genetic communist you feel that noticing behavioural
patterns relating to race would cause a conflict with your belief
in biological Marxism." Big Pete, famous Usenet Racist
Gunner
2006-04-10 17:29:24 UTC
On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 05:55:53 -0700, "Matt Barrow"
Post by Matt Barrow
Post by Gunner
On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 00:21:24 -0700, "Matt Barrow"
Post by Matt Barrow
Post by clintonG
Its fiction and its an older book written in the 1970s but go the library
and check out "Lucifer's Hammer" (Niven, Pournelle), read it, and then
tell me you want to live around Ohio or anywhere else in the Midwest.
You'd make such an argument based on a work of FICTION?
It would depend on the accuracy of the data contained in the book.
Fiction <--> data in book = ???
Of course. Dont read much do you? A work of fiction means that the
plot is fictional, not that the basic premise or the data used is
necessarily bogus. Tom Clancey comes to mind. Louis le Amoure as
another. Well researched, data is correct and so forth. Steven Koontz
as another.

In fact...the more well regarded fiction is more of an alternative
history, rather than some hodgepodge of stuff stuck together.

What makes you think that a fictional work has nothing accurate in it?

Gunner

"I think this is because of your belief in biological Marxism.
As a genetic communist you feel that noticing behavioural
patterns relating to race would cause a conflict with your belief
in biological Marxism." Big Pete, famous Usenet Racist
Matt Barrow
2006-04-11 01:28:28 UTC
Post by Gunner
On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 05:55:53 -0700, "Matt Barrow"
Post by Matt Barrow
Post by Gunner
It would depend on the accuracy of the data contained in the book.
Fiction <--> data in book = ???
Of course. Dont read much do you?
Want to come over and see the library in my den?

You can remove the foot from your mouth anytime now.
Post by Gunner
A work of fiction means that the
plot is fictional, not that the basic premise or the data used is
necessarily bogus. Tom Clancey comes to mind. Louis le Amoure as
another. Well researched, data is correct and so forth. Steven Koontz
as another.
And then there's Heinlein, and the science "fanatsy" genre, "Alternative
Histroy"...
Post by Gunner
In fact...the more well regarded fiction is more of an alternative
history, rather than some hodgepodge of stuff stuck together.
What makes you think that a fictional work has nothing accurate in it?
The way "facts" are used. There's a big difference between realistic fiction
and "fantasy". That's the case in the book (Lucifer's Hammer).
Gunner
2006-04-11 05:39:17 UTC
On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 18:28:28 -0700, "Matt Barrow"
Post by Matt Barrow
Post by Gunner
On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 05:55:53 -0700, "Matt Barrow"
Post by Matt Barrow
Post by Gunner
It would depend on the accuracy of the data contained in the book.
Fiction <--> data in book = ???
Of course. Dont read much do you?
Want to come over and see the library in my den?
Then why did you ask such a foolish question?
Post by Matt Barrow
You can remove the foot from your mouth anytime now.
You first. Btw..my library has about 6000 books in it. Yours?
Post by Matt Barrow
Post by Gunner
A work of fiction means that the
plot is fictional, not that the basic premise or the data used is
necessarily bogus. Tom Clancey comes to mind. Louis le Amoure as
another. Well researched, data is correct and so forth. Steven Koontz
as another.
And then there's Heinlein, and the science "fanatsy" genre, "Alternative
Histroy"...
Yes indeed, there is. Hence my "not necessarily bogus" comment.
Post by Matt Barrow
Post by Gunner
In fact...the more well regarded fiction is more of an alternative
history, rather than some hodgepodge of stuff stuck together.
What makes you think that a fictional work has nothing accurate in it?
The way "facts" are used. There's a big difference between realistic fiction
and "fantasy". That's the case in the book (Lucifer's Hammer).
Such as? Be specific.
Gunner

"I think this is because of your belief in biological Marxism.
As a genetic communist you feel that noticing behavioural
patterns relating to race would cause a conflict with your belief
in biological Marxism." Big Pete, famous Usenet Racist
marika
2006-10-07 22:44:52 UTC
com
Post by DT
Post by DT
says...
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the=
safest places to live in the USA?
Ohio. No deadly creatures, either. Some cold weather, but the souther=
n
Post by DT
part of
Post by DT
the state is much warmer than along Lake Erie where I live. Very
affordable
Post by DT
housing. Jobs. Ohio.
--
Dennis
Ohio =3D heat, humidity, flat, tornadoes
O MY GOD!!! someone goes on record supporting TV dad's theory!!!!

--
"I am not saying the story is true, but I think Mohammad
Al-Fayed should hear it."--Allan Starkie
Frank F. Matthews
2006-10-08 00:30:51 UTC
Post by marika
Post by Robert
Post by DT
says...
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
Ohio. No deadly creatures, either. Some cold weather, but the southern
part of the state is much warmer than along Lake Erie where I live. Very
affordable housing. Jobs. Ohio.
Dennis
Ohio = heat, humidity, flat, tornadoes
O MY GOD!!! someone goes on record supporting TV dad's theory!!!!
The southern part of Ohio does support Copperheads (snakes not
political). While, perhaps not deadly they are about what you get in
the USA,

In any case safety does not exist even on the level of natural disasters.
sechumlib
2006-10-08 13:14:54 UTC
On 2006-10-07 20:30:51 -0400, "Frank F. Matthews"
Post by Frank F. Matthews
The southern part of Ohio does support Copperheads (snakes not
political). While, perhaps not deadly they are about what you get in
the USA,
The southern part isn't flat, either.
Day Brown
2006-10-10 23:10:30 UTC
Near the end of "Collapse" by Jared Diamond, he discusses those areas
which recover from economic/social collapse the fastest.

Since reading him these and other criteria come to mind.
1- steep or hilly forested terrain. The timber provides building
material, tool handles, and firewood. It also prevents agribusiness from
moving in, since they like large contiguous tracts. This results in
small farmers being left in possession with a culture familiar with the
idea of "making do" that goes back for generations.

2- Homogeneous, and low population. Where there are minorities, there
will be demagogues scapegoating rather than leaders trying to reason out
what should be done. But if the population is too high, mobs easily form
to be driven by demagoguery. If the majority is rural, they they already
know a lot about living off the land; they have backyard gardens, and
wont be wasting time wandering around the streets looking for jobs that
dont exist, desperate enough to take any offer.

3- Sufficient rainfall to support a forest that is at low risk of fire.
Grassland and brush will be scary too. Nobody'll be coming to put the
fires out, and firebugs will be trying to get as much burning as they
can. Such sufficient rainfall should not need irrigation, which may well
be sabotaged by nut cases.

4- Avoid mining areas. Ground water may be polluted. Avoid the coasts;
hurricanes, tsunamis, earthquakes, and high desperate populations.

Transnationals have realized that rural and small town people stay put,
and are therefore more reliable workers. Has a lot to do with why Toyota
put a plant in relatively rural Tennessee.

Likewise Wall Mart and several National Trucking outfits headquarter in
NW Arkansas small towns along US 71 that runs from Ft. Smith to Joplin.
The U of AR in Fayetteville there has created a mini high tech boom. The
region is receiving a net *immigration* of professionals from the West
Coast. The land, taxes, & real estate costs are so low that engineers
can accept salaries not that much higher than Bangalore. Folks in that
area dont worry about outsourcing.

This kind of thing creates stable communities that are far more likely
to be able to pull together in an economic crisis, avoid civil unrest,
and therefore be among the safest places in the Untied States of Denial.

There is a band from 36 to 38 deg North, from the OK line eastward til
the population density increases that has much milder winters that will
be much less demanding of wood heat, much longer growing seasons with
greens all winter long, and a wide variety of post crash resources that
were important 100 years ago, and pretty much ignored in favor of large
transnational operations since.

There are small, and often ignored, *oil* wells in Arkansas, southern
Illinois and Indiana. Silver and lead mines in the NE Ozarks, Coal in
pockets from AR to the NC line. The steep hilly land also has lotsa dams
for recreational lakes and- *hydro-electric*, that itself is often still
Co-op since it was founded by the REA.

The limestone bedrock East of the Mississippi has produced sweeter soil-
the famous "Bluegrass" pastures of Kentucky for livestock. That has,
however also driven up the population in that area. There is, however,
one outcropping of Limestone in the NE Ozarks, ie Searcy County, that
even now is crushed for concrete & soil conditioning. Neutralizing acid
soils has a dramatic effect on crop harvests.

Steep hilly land has also produced picturesque towns like Eureka Springs
and Branson MO with large artist communities and musicians. They will of
course, all be out of jobs, but they are also better educated than the
average hillbilly and less susceptible to demagoguery.

What will be safest for *you* will depend on what skills you have that
may be in demand *now* to allow you to be settled in an integrated in a
community rather than seen as a newbie flatlander. Whether a place will
be safe or not may depend on when you arrive and what you bring. These
steep twisty blacktop roads, that look so good in New Car TV ads, are
also prime places for entrepreneurs setting up roadblocks and taking
everything you have, including your life. If the proverbial schitt has
already hit the fan I would not try to go there then.

But by the same token, if you are already established, community spirit
will result in well regulated militias to keep out refugees. It only
takes a few snipers who know the lay of the land to stop even armies.

During the civil war, the Northern Arkansas Ozark counties, already had
a lot of mixed breed Cherokee/Scots-Irish who wanted no part in the war
to protect the assets of plantation owners, and they *seceded* from the
Confederate government in Little Rock. They will do that again.
Hatunen
2006-04-09 23:41:36 UTC
Post by DT
says...
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
Ohio. No deadly creatures, either.
But Ohio has tornados. And some nast squall lines off Lake Erie.


************* DAVE HATUNEN (***@cox.net) *************
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
* My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
Ken
2006-04-09 04:08:53 UTC
Post by John
When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?
Who cares? You're much more likely to be killed in a traffic accident than
any of those things. Of natuaral disasters, doesn't heat kill more people
than all those other things?
Hank Sniadoch
2006-04-09 05:55:55 UTC
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?
If for example I wanted to live in the USA, I don't think it would be
a good idea for me to choose Arizona because I have skin that easily
burns. I also wouldn't want to choose somewhere like Maine or
Minnesota where it might be freezing a lot of the time.
I also just had a question about home construction in the US. Whenever
I see images on television of the damage from Tornados and Hurricanes
etc, a lot of the homes that have suffered damage or have been
completely destroyed, it seems that they are mainly constructed of
timber. I don't understand why so many homes in the US especially in
areas were you get a lot of Hurricanes and Tornados at certain times
of the year are constructed of timber. Surely it would be better if
they were constructed of something more solid like big stone?
I have been watching some of the devastation on the news in paces like
Tennessee from the recent tornados. I have also been in the middle of
a Hurricane (Fran) once when I was on holiday in the US and visiting
friends in North Carolina back in 1996 so have seen first hand the
damage that can be done. I have also witnessed massive hailstones that
fell in Pennsylvania when I worked there, and saw all the smashed
windscreens on cars afterwards.
I just wondered what the opinion is of people who work in the
construction industry. Would it help if homes were built of different
materials to timber?
I am also thinking there must be some type of material that can be
used to make car windscreens (windshields) that wouldn't smash if hit
by large hailstone? Maybe some sort of see through plastic/rubber that
the hailstone would just bounce off instead of smashing through? If we
can make bulletproof cars surely making a windscreen that doesn't
smash is also possible?
If you have any suggestions for some relatively safe states in the US
I would be very interested to know.
I am guessing that much of the south and south east can be ruled out
for the Hurricanes and the middle of the country for tornados. The
Western seaboard for the fault line. Places like Texas, Arizona,
Nevada, Southern California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida for the
heat. The North, NW and NE for the freezing temperatures, so that will
remove states like Alaska, Washington, Montana, N&S Dakota, Minnesota,
Wisconsin, Michigan, New York, Maine etc. See my rough map. I'm not
sure if I've done a good job of getting roughly the right areas for
the danger spots? http://tinyurl.com/nt3vm
What's left? Oregon? Hawaii?
John
Yes.
bookburn
2006-04-09 08:08:06 UTC
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?
You should add up all your categories of danger and summarize as just: Where
is it that I can walk outside without fear? I hear that communist countries
are/were relatively safe. Not sure if Cuba is safe. Japan is safe. Probably
Switzerland is safe.

I recently read a novel where the central character was saying that when he
lived in Africa, Burma and India he felt all the people were very innocent and
safe. But maybe he was just that kind of person bookburn
Antipodean Bucket Farmer
2006-04-09 23:44:31 UTC
Post by bookburn
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?
You should add up all your categories of danger and summarize as just: Where
is it that I can walk outside without fear? I hear that communist countries
are/were relatively safe. Not sure if Cuba is safe. Japan is safe. Probably
Switzerland is safe.
Commie countries? Cuba? Puh-leeze.

Japan looks safe. But, upon walking outside, can I be confident
of getting back in? Or is the rent payment (and other costs of
living) so high that I am in danger of being evicted?

Switzerland? What is the danger of crushing tax bills?
--
Want Freebies?
http://www.TheFreeStuffList.com/
Check The Free Stuff List
Hatunen
2006-04-10 00:15:36 UTC
On Sun, 9 Apr 2006 16:44:31 -0700, Antipodean Bucket Farmer
Post by Antipodean Bucket Farmer
Japan looks safe. But, upon walking outside, can I be confident
of getting back in? Or is the rent payment (and other costs of
living) so high that I am in danger of being evicted?
Japan?? The country that has regular earthquake and tsunami
drills?



************* DAVE HATUNEN (***@cox.net) *************
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
* My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
bookburn
2006-04-10 01:17:07 UTC
Post by Antipodean Bucket Farmer
Post by bookburn
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?
Where
is it that I can walk outside without fear? I hear that communist countries
are/were relatively safe. Not sure if Cuba is safe. Japan is safe.
Probably
Switzerland is safe.
Commie countries? Cuba? Puh-leeze.
Japan looks safe. But, upon walking outside, can I be confident
of getting back in? Or is the rent payment (and other costs of
living) so high that I am in danger of being evicted?
Switzerland? What is the danger of crushing tax bills?
Okay, one I just heard about is Monte Carlo, where they have no income tax and
it's run by the mafia. bb
Post by Antipodean Bucket Farmer
--
Want Freebies?
http://www.TheFreeStuffList.com/
Check The Free Stuff List
Eugene Miya
2006-04-11 01:26:29 UTC
Followups reduced.
Post by bookburn
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?
As crime and danger goes, the US rates 1 Pelton Star.
Post by bookburn
You should add up all your categories of danger and summarize as just: Where
is it that I can walk outside without fear? I hear that communist countries
are/were relatively safe. Not sure if Cuba is safe. Japan is safe. Probably
Switzerland is safe.
Relatively.
You still have avalanches, car accidents, etc.
Post by bookburn
I recently read a novel where the central character was saying that when he
lived in Africa, Burma and India he felt all the people were very innocent and
safe. But maybe he was just that kind of person bookburn
Some African "republics" rate 5 stars.


%A Robert Young Pelton
%A Coskun Aral
%A others
%T The World's Most Dangerous Places, 3rd ed. (now in 5th)
%I Fielding's Travel Guides
%C Redondo Beach, CA
%D 2003
%X www.comebackalive.com
%X In the Foreword, in the subsection "Who This Book is For" under
'Adventure Travellers' reads:
Most adventure travellers rely on politically correct but militarily
naive guidebooks like Lonely Planet, Moon and Rough Guides.
They provide minimal coverage of war zones and simply tell you
to stay away.
And "A Polite Discourse on Liability (ours) and Gullibility (yours):"
This book is more likely to kill you than save your life.
Good sections on Bribery, Terrorism, Land Mines, what to take,
Dangerous places, Dangerous Jobs, Dangerous diseases, and examples
of dangerous things. Includes the United States as a dangerous place
(NYC and LA). Quite nicely done. Not completely cynical.
Useful for journalists. This book properly notes the utility of a
Polaroid (tm) camera.
%X Now in the 5th edition. 2 co-editors have now died (Wink Dulles (1956-2001)
and Gervaise Roderick (Roddy) Scott (1971-2002)).
%X
Foreword
LIST OF MAPS # Reasonable maps
What is Dangerous?
What Danger Awaits the Weary Traveler?
Minibuses, taxis, automobiles, boats, planes, trains
Making the Best of Nasty Situations: Dangerous Destinations
war zones, ugly Americans, revolutionary places, radical places,
nasty places, poor places, terrorist places, criminal places,
Business Travellers: Professional Victims
Dangerous places for business travel
Gangsters: the businessman's friend
Tourists: Fodder for Fiends
Dangerous Places
# the geographic meat of the book, like Cambodia which in turn sparked them to response "A bit unfair" and "No comment."
Criminal Places
# a good calibration including Mexico and the USA: covers LA and NYC. Good.
Forbidden Places
# e.g., Cuba, Iran, Iraq, N. Korea, Libya, etc. Very useful for journalists.
Coming Attractions
# an interesting social studies lesson
Dangerous Things
Hey America, what time is it?
Every 2 seconds a criminal offense
every 12 sec. a burglary
every 17 seconds a violent crime
every 20 seconds vehicle is stolen
every 51 sec. a robbery
every 5 minutes a rape
every 23 minutes a murder <- you want this
ever 28 sec. agg. assault
Every 30 min. news, weather and sports
Pelton has a great sense of humor.
[This from the FBI.]
Bribes
Dangerous Jobs
Dangerous Diseases
Drugs
Getting Arrested
Guns [Boys and Their Toys]
Kidnapping
Land Mines # Janes' is the best thing, followed by military manuals
Military and Paramilitary Organizations
Terrorism
ADVENTURE GUIDE
Adventure Calls
Adventure Clubs
What to Pack # Good, special, better than average
Save Humanity
Save the Planet
Save Yourself
Visas and Entry Requirements
Tourist Offices
Intl. Long-Distance Access Codes
Index
%X http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/examiner/archive/1997/06/29/TRAVEL1856.dtl
%X Pelton's list of World's most boring places: 2nd ed.:
[clearly a generalization, you can still die there]
Canada, the Caribbean, Costa Rica, Mongolia, New Zealand, Pacific Islands,
The Vatican, Australia, Switzerland, Iceland, Antarctica.

--
Frank F. Matthews
2006-04-09 15:39:56 UTC
Your map shows the line for cold as much too far north. It shows the
line for hurricanes as much too coastal. Your earthquake area should
show almost all of the US except for a bit of coastal TX and part of
FLA. You left out Tsunamis, sink holes, & volcanos.

Basically your best bet is to die young.
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?
If for example I wanted to live in the USA, I don't think it would be
a good idea for me to choose Arizona because I have skin that easily
burns. I also wouldn't want to choose somewhere like Maine or
Minnesota where it might be freezing a lot of the time.
I also just had a question about home construction in the US. Whenever
I see images on television of the damage from Tornados and Hurricanes
etc, a lot of the homes that have suffered damage or have been
completely destroyed, it seems that they are mainly constructed of
timber. I don't understand why so many homes in the US especially in
areas were you get a lot of Hurricanes and Tornados at certain times
of the year are constructed of timber. Surely it would be better if
they were constructed of something more solid like big stone?
I have been watching some of the devastation on the news in paces like
Tennessee from the recent tornados. I have also been in the middle of
a Hurricane (Fran) once when I was on holiday in the US and visiting
friends in North Carolina back in 1996 so have seen first hand the
damage that can be done. I have also witnessed massive hailstones that
fell in Pennsylvania when I worked there, and saw all the smashed
windscreens on cars afterwards.
I just wondered what the opinion is of people who work in the
construction industry. Would it help if homes were built of different
materials to timber?
I am also thinking there must be some type of material that can be
used to make car windscreens (windshields) that wouldn't smash if hit
by large hailstone? Maybe some sort of see through plastic/rubber that
the hailstone would just bounce off instead of smashing through? If we
can make bulletproof cars surely making a windscreen that doesn't
smash is also possible?
If you have any suggestions for some relatively safe states in the US
I would be very interested to know.
I am guessing that much of the south and south east can be ruled out
for the Hurricanes and the middle of the country for tornados. The
Western seaboard for the fault line. Places like Texas, Arizona,
Nevada, Southern California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida for the
heat. The North, NW and NE for the freezing temperatures, so that will
remove states like Alaska, Washington, Montana, N&S Dakota, Minnesota,
Wisconsin, Michigan, New York, Maine etc. See my rough map. I'm not
sure if I've done a good job of getting roughly the right areas for
the danger spots? http://tinyurl.com/nt3vm
What's left? Oregon? Hawaii?
John
Hatunen
2006-04-09 23:51:03 UTC
On Sun, 09 Apr 2006 15:39:56 GMT, "Frank F. Matthews"
Post by Frank F. Matthews
Your map shows the line for cold as much too far north. It shows the
line for hurricanes as much too coastal. Your earthquake area should
show almost all of the US except for a bit of coastal TX and part of
FLA. You left out Tsunamis, sink holes, & volcanos.
Basically your best bet is to die young.
Some places are both hot and cold. When I lived in Richland,
Washington, the winters could be bitterly cold, but it got up to
the likes of 113F in the summer.


************* DAVE HATUNEN (***@cox.net) *************
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
* My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
Mimi
2006-04-10 17:03:27 UTC
Post by Hatunen
On Sun, 09 Apr 2006 15:39:56 GMT, "Frank F. Matthews"
Post by Frank F. Matthews
Your map shows the line for cold as much too far north. It shows the
line for hurricanes as much too coastal. Your earthquake area should
show almost all of the US except for a bit of coastal TX and part of
FLA. You left out Tsunamis, sink holes, & volcanos.
Basically your best bet is to die young.
Some places are both hot and cold. When I lived in Richland,
Washington, the winters could be bitterly cold, but it got up to
the likes of 113F in the summer.
Bitterly cold? Well, maybe relative to Tucson, but not to other parts of the
US.

I think the OP eliminated Washington state for extreme cold, not realizing
how much warmer it is west of the Cascades. But, of course, we're
disqualified because of earthquakes.

When I lived in LA, it wasn't only the earthquakes. There were also grass
fires and landslides. For all the picture of idyllic weather there, lots of
(natural) bad stuff can happen.

To the OP, regarding wood houses. They're the best thing in an earthquake.
Bricks and stones, if not reinforced properly, shake apart. Stick-built
houses are lightweight and nailed together in a semi-rigid framework; they
withstand quakes quite well. 2 caveats: the wood house must be bolted to its
foundation or it just slides off. And all too often your house does fine,
but the brick chimney falls over on the house.

Marianne (in Seattle)
Hatunen
2006-04-10 17:55:44 UTC
Post by Mimi
Post by Hatunen
On Sun, 09 Apr 2006 15:39:56 GMT, "Frank F. Matthews"
Post by Frank F. Matthews
Your map shows the line for cold as much too far north. It shows the
line for hurricanes as much too coastal. Your earthquake area should
show almost all of the US except for a bit of coastal TX and part of
FLA. You left out Tsunamis, sink holes, & volcanos.
Basically your best bet is to die young.
Some places are both hot and cold. When I lived in Richland,
Washington, the winters could be bitterly cold, but it got up to
the likes of 113F in the summer.
Bitterly cold? Well, maybe relative to Tucson, but not to other parts of the
US.
You know, I used to be a landed immigrant in Montreal, and I've
lived in upstate New York and in Kansas for typical plains
blizzards so I have a pretty good idea what I'm talking about. it
can get bitterly cold in the Tri-Cities area. One week we had
very cold and about two feet of snow (but then one morning about
three am a chinook hit; remarkable if you've not experiencee
one).
Post by Mimi
I think the OP eliminated Washington state for extreme cold, not realizing
how much warmer it is west of the Cascades. But, of course, we're
disqualified because of earthquakes.
Surely cold winter drizzle counts.
Post by Mimi
When I lived in LA, it wasn't only the earthquakes. There were also grass
fires and landslides. For all the picture of idyllic weather there, lots of
(natural) bad stuff can happen.
To the OP, regarding wood houses. They're the best thing in an earthquake.
Bricks and stones, if not reinforced properly, shake apart. Stick-built
houses are lightweight and nailed together in a semi-rigid framework; they
withstand quakes quite well. 2 caveats: the wood house must be bolted to its
foundation or it just slides off. And all too often your house does fine,
but the brick chimney falls over on the house.
Marianne (in Seattle)
Don't forget the inevitablility of a repeat of the year 1700
major subduction zone earthquake in the Pacific Northwest and its
subsequent tsunami (very similr to the Indian ocean event last
year). And the possibility of lahars from Mt Rainier. And falling
ash; Mt St Helens ruined my VW's engine, and we were on the edge
of the ash fallout.

************* DAVE HATUNEN (***@cox.net) *************
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
* My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
Mimi
2006-04-11 15:29:44 UTC
Post by Hatunen
Post by Mimi
Bitterly cold? Well, maybe relative to Tucson, but not to other parts of the
US.
You know, I used to be a landed immigrant in Montreal, and I've
lived in upstate New York and in Kansas for typical plains
blizzards so I have a pretty good idea what I'm talking about. it
can get bitterly cold in the Tri-Cities area. One week we had
very cold and about two feet of snow (but then one morning about
three am a chinook hit; remarkable if you've not experiencee
one).
I just looked up the average January low in Richland; it's 24. In Montreal
it's 7. Maybe you just hit a bad spell.
Post by Hatunen
snip>
Don't forget the inevitablility of a repeat of the year 1700
major subduction zone earthquake in the Pacific Northwest and its
subsequent tsunami (very similr to the Indian ocean event last
year). And the possibility of lahars from Mt Rainier. And falling
ash; Mt St Helens ruined my VW's engine, and we were on the edge
of the ash fallout.
Don't worry, I haven't forgotten. As for the ashfall from Mt. St. Helens,
never got to Seattle.

Marianne
Hatunen
2006-04-11 17:57:54 UTC
Post by Mimi
Post by Hatunen
Post by Mimi
Bitterly cold? Well, maybe relative to Tucson, but not to other parts of the
US.
You know, I used to be a landed immigrant in Montreal, and I've
lived in upstate New York and in Kansas for typical plains
blizzards so I have a pretty good idea what I'm talking about. it
can get bitterly cold in the Tri-Cities area. One week we had
very cold and about two feet of snow (but then one morning about
three am a chinook hit; remarkable if you've not experiencee
one).
I just looked up the average January low in Richland; it's 24. In Montreal
it's 7. Maybe you just hit a bad spell.
You apparently would have trouble believing that someone could
drown in 20 feet of water while wading across a lake with an
average depth of 18-incehs.
Post by Mimi
Post by Hatunen
snip>
Don't forget the inevitablility of a repeat of the year 1700
major subduction zone earthquake in the Pacific Northwest and its
subsequent tsunami (very similr to the Indian ocean event last
year). And the possibility of lahars from Mt Rainier. And falling
ash; Mt St Helens ruined my VW's engine, and we were on the edge
of the ash fallout.
Don't worry, I haven't forgotten. As for the ashfall from Mt. St. Helens,
never got to Seattle.
You were lucky. But Mt St Helen is not your only concern.

************* DAVE HATUNEN (***@cox.net) *************
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
* My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
Dave Smith
2006-04-11 21:05:31 UTC
Post by Mimi
Don't worry, I haven't forgotten. As for the ashfall from Mt. St. Helens,
never got to Seattle.
It didn't? That's amazing because it made it to my friends' place just south
of Vancouver.
Frank F. Matthews
2006-04-10 18:13:41 UTC
Post by Mimi
Post by Hatunen
On Sun, 09 Apr 2006 15:39:56 GMT, "Frank F. Matthews"
Post by Frank F. Matthews
Your map shows the line for cold as much too far north. It shows the
line for hurricanes as much too coastal. Your earthquake area should
show almost all of the US except for a bit of coastal TX and part of
FLA. You left out Tsunamis, sink holes, & volcanos.
Basically your best bet is to die young.
Some places are both hot and cold. When I lived in Richland,
Washington, the winters could be bitterly cold, but it got up to
the likes of 113F in the summer.
Bitterly cold? Well, maybe relative to Tucson, but not to other parts of the
US.
I think the OP eliminated Washington state for extreme cold, not realizing
how much warmer it is west of the Cascades. But, of course, we're
disqualified because of earthquakes.
When I lived in LA, it wasn't only the earthquakes. There were also grass
fires and landslides. For all the picture of idyllic weather there, lots of
(natural) bad stuff can happen.
To the OP, regarding wood houses. They're the best thing in an earthquake.
Bricks and stones, if not reinforced properly, shake apart. Stick-built
houses are lightweight and nailed together in a semi-rigid framework; they
withstand quakes quite well. 2 caveats: the wood house must be bolted to its
foundation or it just slides off. And all too often your house does fine,
but the brick chimney falls over on the house.
Marianne (in Seattle)
Construction is tricky. I am reminded of the Kobe earthquake where in
the older section of town the very heavy roofs intended to resist
hurricanes managed to come down crushing folks. They avoided one
problem only to cause another.
Glenn
2006-04-09 16:07:55 UTC
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
I like Kansas. Supposedly the tornado alley state but I am 75 and have
never seen one. Does happen sometimes but so do car accidents.

If you chose to live in a forest, you know darned well sometime there will
be a forest fire. Not if but a certainty.

On the coast, especially east, you know you will have hurricanes
occasionally, not maybe but a certainty.

Live in the mountains and there is a good chance a rock slide or forest fire
will get you.

I'll take the good old boring central states
Dave Smith
2006-04-09 16:42:04 UTC
Post by Glenn
I like Kansas. Supposedly the tornado alley state but I am 75 and have
never seen one. Does happen sometimes but so do car accidents.
If you chose to live in a forest, you know darned well sometime there will
be a forest fire. Not if but a certainty.
On the coast, especially east, you know you will have hurricanes
occasionally, not maybe but a certainty.
Live in the mountains and there is a good chance a rock slide or forest fire
will get you.
I'll take the good old boring central states
I realize that southern Ontario doesn't qualify since it is not in the US, but
is is relatively hazard free. The last bad blizzard we had was almost 30 years
ago. Every ten years or so there is a small hurricane that comes along and
knocks over a few trees and takes off a roof . The last hurricane that hit here
with any force was Hurricane Hazel in 1954. We don't get volcanos, earthquakes,
floods. It doesn't get extremely hot or extremely cold. It's pretty safe and
boring. Most of us are doomed to die of old age.
gman99
2006-04-09 18:13:02 UTC
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Glenn
I like Kansas. Supposedly the tornado alley state but I am 75 and have
never seen one. Does happen sometimes but so do car accidents.
If you chose to live in a forest, you know darned well sometime there will
be a forest fire. Not if but a certainty.
On the coast, especially east, you know you will have hurricanes
occasionally, not maybe but a certainty.
Live in the mountains and there is a good chance a rock slide or forest fire
will get you.
I'll take the good old boring central states
I realize that southern Ontario doesn't qualify since it is not in the US, but
is is relatively hazard free. The last bad blizzard we had was almost 30 years
ago. Every ten years or so there is a small hurricane that comes along and
knocks over a few trees and takes off a roof . The last hurricane that hit here
with any force was Hurricane Hazel in 1954. We don't get volcanos, earthquakes,
floods. It doesn't get extremely hot or extremely cold. It's pretty safe and
boring. Most of us are doomed to die of old age.
Yes but then the smog is somewhat hazardous to ones health as is an
increased risk of tornados...there are also heat spells. If you're
thinking Canada the best climate is probably southern NS. No extreme
cold or heat...little snow. There is a very small risk of hurricanes
reaching the area...the weather on the west coast is a bit better but
then they are on the brink of falling into the ocean by the 'big one'
or being swamped by a tsunami.
Dave Smith
2006-04-09 19:17:35 UTC
Post by gman99
Post by Dave Smith
I realize that southern Ontario doesn't qualify since it is not in the US, but
is is relatively hazard free. The last bad blizzard we had was almost 30 years
ago. Every ten years or so there is a small hurricane that comes along and
knocks over a few trees and takes off a roof . The last hurricane that hit here
with any force was Hurricane Hazel in 1954. We don't get volcanos, earthquakes,
floods. It doesn't get extremely hot or extremely cold. It's pretty safe and
boring. Most of us are doomed to die of old age.
Yes but then the smog is somewhat hazardous to ones health as is an
increased risk of tornados...there are also heat spells. If you're
thinking Canada the best climate is probably southern NS. No extreme
cold or heat...little snow. There is a very small risk of hurricanes
reaching the area...the weather on the west coast is a bit better but
then they are on the brink of falling into the ocean by the 'big one'
or being swamped by a tsunami.
Smog is not a problem where I live. Our hot spells seem hot relative to the rest of
our weather, but what we call a heat spell some people would consider to be normal
summer weather. It rarely gets into the 90s. The west coast is incredibly beautiful
and seldom gets really cold. The rain gets depressing, and there is that threat of
drifting apart from the rest of the continent.
Hunt
2006-04-11 04:45:38 UTC
In article <***@e56g2000cwe.googlegroups.com>, gman99
@canada.com says...
Post by gman99
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Glenn
I like Kansas. Supposedly the tornado alley state but I am 75 and have
never seen one. Does happen sometimes but so do car accidents.
If you chose to live in a forest, you know darned well sometime there will
be a forest fire. Not if but a certainty.
On the coast, especially east, you know you will have hurricanes
occasionally, not maybe but a certainty.
Live in the mountains and there is a good chance a rock slide or forest fire
will get you.
I'll take the good old boring central states
I realize that southern Ontario doesn't qualify since it is not in the US, but
is is relatively hazard free. The last bad blizzard we had was almost 30 years
ago. Every ten years or so there is a small hurricane that comes along and
knocks over a few trees and takes off a roof . The last hurricane that hit
her
Post by gman99
e
Post by Dave Smith
with any force was Hurricane Hazel in 1954. We don't get volcanos,
earthquakes
Post by gman99
,
Post by Dave Smith
floods. It doesn't get extremely hot or extremely cold. It's pretty safe and
boring. Most of us are doomed to die of old age.
Yes but then the smog is somewhat hazardous to ones health as is an
increased risk of tornados...there are also heat spells. If you're
thinking Canada the best climate is probably southern NS. No extreme
cold or heat...little snow. There is a very small risk of hurricanes
reaching the area...the weather on the west coast is a bit better but
then they are on the brink of falling into the ocean by the 'big one'
or being swamped by a tsunami.
But the black flies can strip a carcass in seconds.

Hunt
--
NewsGuy.Com 30Gb $9.95 Carry Forward and On Demand Bandwidth
Hatunen
2006-04-10 00:05:07 UTC
On Sun, 09 Apr 2006 12:42:04 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
I realize that southern Ontario doesn't qualify since it is not in the US, but
is is relatively hazard free. The last bad blizzard we had was almost 30 years
ago. Every ten years or so there is a small hurricane that comes along and
knocks over a few trees and takes off a roof . The last hurricane that hit here
with any force was Hurricane Hazel in 1954. We don't get volcanos, earthquakes,
floods. It doesn't get extremely hot or extremely cold. It's pretty safe and
boring. Most of us are doomed to die of old age.
Gotta watch out for those ice age glaciers, though.


************* DAVE HATUNEN (***@cox.net) *************
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
* My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
Dave Smith
2006-04-10 12:41:55 UTC
Post by Dave Smith
ce it is not in the US, but
Post by Dave Smith
is is relatively hazard free. The last bad blizzard we had was almost 30 years
ago. Every ten years or so there is a small hurricane that comes along and
knocks over a few trees and takes off a roof . The last hurricane that hit here
with any force was Hurricane Hazel in 1954. We don't get volcanos, earthquakes,
floods. It doesn't get extremely hot or extremely cold. It's pretty safe and
boring. Most of us are doomed to die of old age.
Gotta watch out for those ice age glaciers, though.
Luckily, I missed the last one, 20,000 years ago :-)
Hatunen
2006-04-10 16:39:24 UTC
On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 08:41:55 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
ce it is not in the US, but
Post by Dave Smith
is is relatively hazard free. The last bad blizzard we had was almost 30 years
ago. Every ten years or so there is a small hurricane that comes along and
knocks over a few trees and takes off a roof . The last hurricane that hit here
with any force was Hurricane Hazel in 1954. We don't get volcanos, earthquakes,
floods. It doesn't get extremely hot or extremely cold. It's pretty safe and
boring. Most of us are doomed to die of old age.
Gotta watch out for those ice age glaciers, though.
Luckily, I missed the last one, 20,000 years ago :-)
But the next one is coming.

************* DAVE HATUNEN (***@cox.net) *************
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
* My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
sechumlib
2006-04-10 18:42:37 UTC
Post by Hatunen
On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 08:41:55 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
ce it is not in the US, but
Post by Dave Smith
is is relatively hazard free. The last bad blizzard we had was almost 30 years
ago. Every ten years or so there is a small hurricane that comes along and
knocks over a few trees and takes off a roof . The last hurricane that hit here
with any force was Hurricane Hazel in 1954. We don't get volcanos, earthquakes,
floods. It doesn't get extremely hot or extremely cold. It's pretty safe and
boring. Most of us are doomed to die of old age.
Gotta watch out for those ice age glaciers, though.
Luckily, I missed the last one, 20,000 years ago :-)
But the next one is coming.
Oh, you're one of those irrational nuts who think global cooling is
more of a threat than global warming, right?
Dave Smith
2006-04-10 18:51:15 UTC
Post by Hatunen
On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 08:41:55 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
ce it is not in the US, but
Post by Dave Smith
is is relatively hazard free. The last bad blizzard we had was almost 30 years
ago. Every ten years or so there is a small hurricane that comes along and
knocks over a few trees and takes off a roof . The last hurricane that hit here
with any force was Hurricane Hazel in 1954. We don't get volcanos, earthquakes,
floods. It doesn't get extremely hot or extremely cold. It's pretty safe and
boring. Most of us are doomed to die of old age.
Gotta watch out for those ice age glaciers, though.
Luckily, I missed the last one, 20,000 years ago :-)
I am willing to bet that it will not be in my life time :-)
Hatunen
2006-04-10 19:44:14 UTC
On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 14:51:15 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Hatunen
On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 08:41:55 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
ce it is not in the US, but
Post by Dave Smith
is is relatively hazard free. The last bad blizzard we had was almost 30 years
ago. Every ten years or so there is a small hurricane that comes along and
knocks over a few trees and takes off a roof . The last hurricane that hit here
with any force was Hurricane Hazel in 1954. We don't get volcanos, earthquakes,
floods. It doesn't get extremely hot or extremely cold. It's pretty safe and
boring. Most of us are doomed to die of old age.
Gotta watch out for those ice age glaciers, though.
Luckily, I missed the last one, 20,000 years ago :-)
I am willing to bet that it will not be in my life time :-)
That's what New Orleanians usd to say about their flood defenses
being breached. Or more of them would have bought flood
insurance.


************* DAVE HATUNEN (***@cox.net) *************
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
* My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
Gunner
2006-04-09 19:07:44 UTC
Post by Glenn
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
I like Kansas. Supposedly the tornado alley state but I am 75 and have
never seen one. Does happen sometimes but so do car accidents.
If you chose to live in a forest, you know darned well sometime there will
be a forest fire. Not if but a certainty.
On the coast, especially east, you know you will have hurricanes
occasionally, not maybe but a certainty.
Live in the mountains and there is a good chance a rock slide or forest fire
will get you.
I'll take the good old boring central states
Something to consider..is not how safe an area is from natural
disasters...but how well prepared the area/infrastructure for those
emergencies.

I live 5 miles as the crow flies from the San Andreas fault, here in
California. We have small earthquakes every couple days or so..but
most are never felt. I did however lose a home to an earthquake in
1983. The entire town was leveled..but there were only a very few
injuries, and 1 death..and to this day..Im not sure it wasnt a
homicide of opportunity IRRC.

Its been 20 + yrs, the town was rebuilt to modern building codes for
earthquake standards..not the 19th century as it originally was..and I
doubt there were be much serious damage after an equivelant
earthquake. My current home has been hardened against
earthquakes..and if one occurs...the home and infrastructure simply
sways and rides it out. Im more concerned about a couple of my larger
top heavy machine tools in my home hobby shop falling over than losing
the house and grounds.

Good weather, not prone to forest fires here in the desert, no
tornados, no hurricanes, no floods at my elevation etc, limited crime,
no gangs other than a couple local wanna be's, far enough off the
beaten track to not be an attractive destination for hordes of spikey
haired cannible mutants after something really bad in the LA area,
its a heavily armed Red Zone, and local oilfields can provide energy,
fuel and water to the area. Good well hardened hospitals and
emergency services..simply because they have had lots of experience
with earthquakes in the past and have built to counter the issue in
the future, etc etc.

So its not necessarily a state by state comparison that is valid, but
an area by area look that needs to be done.

Gunner

"I think this is because of your belief in biological Marxism.
As a genetic communist you feel that noticing behavioural
patterns relating to race would cause a conflict with your belief
in biological Marxism." Big Pete, famous Usenet Racist
Hatunen
2006-04-10 00:04:19 UTC
Post by Glenn
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
I like Kansas. Supposedly the tornado alley state but I am 75 and have
never seen one. Does happen sometimes but so do car accidents.
I lived in Kansas for three yeaars and, while I never laid my
actual eyes on a tornado, I saw the morning after effects of
several. I lived for a while in Emporia and a major tornado had
wiped out the northwest side of town shortly before I moved
there. I understand that afterward a tornado struck in my former
neighborhood.

http://www.crh.noaa.gov/top/events/june1974.php

It's abit nervewracking watching TV in the evening while a
tornado watch or tornado warning logo sits in the lower corner.
Post by Glenn
If you chose to live in a forest, you know darned well sometime there will
be a forest fire. Not if but a certainty.
On the coast, especially east, you know you will have hurricanes
occasionally, not maybe but a certainty.
Live in the mountains and there is a good chance a rock slide or forest fire
will get you.
I'll take the good old boring central states
When we lived in Kansas I was there for a few years as a
construction engineer. Us outlanders had a saying: "If the doctor
gives you six months to live, move to Kansas; it will seem like
six years."

And:

Q. Why doesn't Oklahoma slide down into Texas?

A. Because Kansas sucks.


************* DAVE HATUNEN (***@cox.net) *************
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
* My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
Jon Bell
2006-04-10 05:36:12 UTC
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
I guess South Carolina is out. Charleston was flattened by an earthquake
in the 1880s, and was whipped by Hurricane Hugo in 1989. Here in the
Upstate we get ice storms such as the one which knocked out electicity to
about a million people for several days last December.
--
Jon Bell <***@presby.edu> Presbyterian College
Dept. of Physics and Computer Science Clinton, South Carolina USA
Hatunen
2006-04-10 16:40:28 UTC
Post by Jon Bell
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
I guess South Carolina is out. Charleston was flattened by an earthquake
in the 1880s, and was whipped by Hurricane Hugo in 1989. Here in the
Upstate we get ice storms such as the one which knocked out electicity to
about a million people for several days last December.
Arizona, Jon, Arizona.

************* DAVE HATUNEN (***@cox.net) *************
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
* My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
the_blogologist
2006-04-10 07:16:55 UTC
Post by John
I don't understand why so many homes in the US especially in
areas were you get a lot of Hurricanes and Tornados at certain times
of the year are constructed of timber. Surely it would be better if
they were constructed of something more solid like big stone?
When tornados hit the damage is very localized. Most people in tornado
alley may have a storm shelter or know of one close. Some schools have
one building that's hardened.

What made Katrina so bad was the New Orleans Levee Board failed to
properly maintain and modernize the levee which was 40 years old! (the
city is below sea level). Even though Bush showed up with the mother of
hurricane reliefs, the press slamed him to get the attention off of the
levee and democrats.

Loading Image...
Post by John
If you have any suggestions for some relatively safe states in the US
I would be very interested to know.
God's wrath is about to fall on the blue states, I highly recommend
moving to one of the RED states. Here are maps showing the safe places:

Loading Image...
Loading Image...
Post by John
Places like Texas,
Texas is hot AND humid (like oklahoma).
Post by John
Arizona,
But it's a dry heat, so it feels cooler. If you look at maps that show
were evaporative coolers work best, they all agree that west of the
Texas - New Mexico boarder is much drier. The humidity makes the heat
feel hotter. I've tried evaporative coolers in Oklahoma and Arizona,
they work MUCH BETTER in Arizona :o/ It's also cooler in the higher
elevations of Arizona.
Post by John
Nevada,
Don't get a DUI in Nevada, they're really tough on DUIs. The 3rd one in
7 years is a year in prison, and a felony for every one after that.
Post by John
What's left? Oregon? Hawaii?
Hawaii sits on top of a volcano ;oD

There's no safe place lol You could travel in an RV so you can haul
ass when danger strikes. Or just move around until you find a place you
WANT to live. The US has LOTS of RV parks around, cost about $300 a
month for a hookup (water, electric, sewage, rent). Your rig/vehicle
needs to be newer and nice looking to get into the best parks.
Dave Smith
2006-04-10 12:47:26 UTC
Post by the_blogologist
When tornados hit the damage is very localized. Most people in tornado
alley may have a storm shelter or know of one close. Some schools have
one building that's hardened.
What made Katrina so bad was the New Orleans Levee Board failed to
properly maintain and modernize the levee which was 40 years old! (the
city is below sea level). Even though Bush showed up with the mother of
hurricane reliefs, the press slamed him to get the attention off of the
levee and democrats.
I think you have that backwards. What made Hurricane Katrina so bad was it
was a Category 5 hurricane. It was the 6th worst Atlantic storm on record.
Hatunen
2006-04-10 16:48:31 UTC
On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 08:47:26 -0400, Dave Smith
Post by Dave Smith
Post by the_blogologist
When tornados hit the damage is very localized. Most people in tornado
alley may have a storm shelter or know of one close. Some schools have
one building that's hardened.
What made Katrina so bad was the New Orleans Levee Board failed to
properly maintain and modernize the levee which was 40 years old! (the
city is below sea level). Even though Bush showed up with the mother of
hurricane reliefs, the press slamed him to get the attention off of the
levee and democrats.
I think you have that backwards. What made Hurricane Katrina so bad was it
was a Category 5 hurricane. It was the 6th worst Atlantic storm on record.
But it was a Category 4 when it hit land.

************* DAVE HATUNEN (***@cox.net) *************
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
* My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
Frank F. Matthews
2006-04-10 16:34:52 UTC
Post by the_blogologist
Post by John
I don't understand why so many homes in the US especially in
areas were you get a lot of Hurricanes and Tornados at certain times
of the year are constructed of timber. Surely it would be better if
they were constructed of something more solid like big stone?
When tornados hit the damage is very localized. Most people in tornado
alley may have a storm shelter or know of one close. Some schools have
one building that's hardened.
What made Katrina so bad was the New Orleans Levee Board failed to
properly maintain and modernize the levee which was 40 years old! (the
city is below sea level). Even though Bush showed up with the mother of
hurricane reliefs, the press slamed him to get the attention off of the
levee and democrats.
http://img319.imageshack.us/img319/9617/bushknew8gh.jpg
Post by John
If you have any suggestions for some relatively safe states in the US
I would be very interested to know.
God's wrath is about to fall on the blue states, I highly recommend
snip

So God has decided that she will switch sides after devastating the red
portions of Florida?

She also appears to not to care about homosexuality but is death on
gambling based on last years experience.
Hatunen
2006-04-10 16:48:04 UTC
Post by the_blogologist
Post by John
I don't understand why so many homes in the US especially in
areas were you get a lot of Hurricanes and Tornados at certain times
of the year are constructed of timber. Surely it would be better if
they were constructed of something more solid like big stone?
When tornados hit the damage is very localized. Most people in tornado
alley may have a storm shelter or know of one close.
No, most people in "tornado alley" don't. Don't you read or see
the news accounts of the aftermath of recent tornados?
Post by the_blogologist
Some schools have one building that's hardened.
Which?
Post by the_blogologist
What made Katrina so bad was the New Orleans Levee Board failed to
properly maintain and modernize the levee which was 40 years old! (the
city is below sea level). Even though Bush showed up with the mother of
hurricane reliefs, the press slamed him to get the attention off of the
levee and democrats.
Katrina caused major damage in places other than isnide the
levees of New Orleans. New Orleans was just the most photogenic.
Post by the_blogologist
http://img319.imageshack.us/img319/9617/bushknew8gh.jpg
Post by John
If you have any suggestions for some relatively safe states in the US
I would be very interested to know.
God's wrath is about to fall on the blue states, I highly recommend
http://img403.imageshack.us/img403/8239/endwar8eh.jpg
http://img419.imageshack.us/img419/6482/osamabluestates3wp.jpg
Post by John
Places like Texas,
Texas is hot AND humid (like oklahoma).
Post by John
Arizona,
But it's a dry heat, so it feels cooler.
Agreed.
If you look at maps that show
Post by the_blogologist
were evaporative coolers work best, they all agree that west of the
Texas - New Mexico boarder is much drier. The humidity makes the heat
feel hotter. I've tried evaporative coolers in Oklahoma and Arizona,
they work MUCH BETTER in Arizona :o/
Refrigerated air conditioning is even better.
Post by the_blogologist
It's also cooler in the higher elevations of Arizona.
One reason I love living here.
Post by the_blogologist
Post by John
Nevada,
Don't get a DUI in Nevada, they're really tough on DUIs. The 3rd one in
7 years is a year in prison, and a felony for every one after that.
Post by John
What's left? Oregon? Hawaii?
Hawaii sits on top of a volcano ;oD
Hawai'i, or at least the island of Hawai'i, IS a volcano. But
it's a shield volcano and pretty harmless to human life.
Post by the_blogologist
There's no safe place lol
but there are places safer than others.


************* DAVE HATUNEN (***@cox.net) *************
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
* My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
the_blogologist
2006-04-11 05:27:44 UTC
Post by Hatunen
Post by the_blogologist
When tornados hit the damage is very localized. Most people in tornado
alley may have a storm shelter or know of one close.
No, most people in "tornado alley" don't.
Well, i meant that most people that worry about it :o/

Yeah, most people in Oklahoma don't have shelters.
Post by Hatunen
Don't you read or see
the news accounts of the aftermath of recent tornados?
The big one that hit oklahoma city passed 5 miles from my house. The
damage is still pretty localized. It just cuts a big path. Most tornados
just harmlessly go across the country side or don't even touch the
ground.
Post by Hatunen
Post by the_blogologist
Some schools have one building that's hardened.
Which?
Well, i guess I should have said "harder". Verden, Oklahoma has a school
that is underground.
sanjian
2006-04-11 12:12:49 UTC
Post by the_blogologist
Post by Hatunen
Post by the_blogologist
Some schools have one building that's hardened.
Which?
Many that were built during the early cold war would be strong candidates.
Though I can't offer many examples, other than that there are rooms in
Norris Hall, here on Va. Tech that are still designated as fallout shelters.
Post by the_blogologist
Well, i guess I should have said "harder". Verden, Oklahoma has a
school that is underground.
How well does that work in a fire, with no windows?
Hatunen
2006-04-11 18:03:54 UTC
Post by the_blogologist
Post by Hatunen
Post by the_blogologist
When tornados hit the damage is very localized. Most people in tornado
alley may have a storm shelter or know of one close.
No, most people in "tornado alley" don't.
Well, i meant that most people that worry about it
Unfortunately, also not true.
Post by the_blogologist
Yeah, most people in Oklahoma don't have shelters.
Fortunately, my wife's family in Apache OK did when she was a
girl.
Post by the_blogologist
Post by Hatunen
Don't you read or see
the news accounts of the aftermath of recent tornados?
The big one that hit oklahoma city passed 5 miles from my house. The
damage is still pretty localized. It just cuts a big path. Most tornados
just harmlessly go across the country side or don't even touch the
ground.
You split me in your quoting. What you said was, "When tornados
hit the damage is very localized. Most people in tornado
alley may have a storm shelter or know of one close."

To which I replied, "No, most people in "tornado alley" don't.
Don't you read or see the news accounts of the aftermath of
recent tornados?".

In context I think it's evident my "news report" comment related
to all those people in the news reports that didn't have storm
shelters.



************* DAVE HATUNEN (***@cox.net) *************
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
* My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
marika
2006-10-07 23:00:37 UTC
Post by Hatunen
Post by the_blogologist
Post by Hatunen
Post by the_blogologist
When tornados hit the damage is very localized. Most people in tornado
alley may have a storm shelter or know of one close.
No, most people in "tornado alley" don't.
Well, i meant that most people that worry about it
Unfortunately, also not true.
OHHHH
Post by Hatunen
Post by the_blogologist
Yeah, most people in Oklahoma don't have shelters.
Fortunately, my wife's family in Apache OK did when she was a
girl.
I swear I really couldn't get that one. i really tried but I COULDN"T GET
THAT ONE.
Post by Hatunen
Post by the_blogologist
Post by Hatunen
Don't you read or see
the news accounts of the aftermath of recent tornados?
The big one that hit oklahoma city passed 5 miles from my house. The
damage is still pretty localized. It just cuts a big path. Most tornados
just harmlessly go across the country side or don't even touch the
ground.
You split me in your quoting.
I swaer i wanst mkiagn fnu of oyu
just don't get the point
Post by Hatunen
What you said was, "When tornados
hit the damage is very localized. Most people in tornado
alley may have a storm shelter or know of one close."
To which I replied, "No, most people in "tornado alley" don't.
Don't you read or see the news accounts of the aftermath of
recent tornados?".
In context I think it's evident my "news report" comment related
to all those people in the news reports that didn't have storm
shelters.
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
* My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
Hatunen
2006-10-08 23:18:48 UTC
Post by marika
Post by Hatunen
Post by the_blogologist
Post by Hatunen
Post by the_blogologist
When tornados hit the damage is very localized. Most people in tornado
alley may have a storm shelter or know of one close.
No, most people in "tornado alley" don't.
Well, i meant that most people that worry about it
Unfortunately, also not true.
OHHHH
Post by Hatunen
Post by the_blogologist
Yeah, most people in Oklahoma don't have shelters.
Fortunately, my wife's family in Apache OK did when she was a
girl.
I swear I really couldn't get that one. i really tried but I COULDN"T GET
THAT ONE.
My god! You're answering a post I made in April!


************* DAVE HATUNEN (***@cox.net) *************
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
* My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *
Caveat
2006-04-10 22:00:56 UTC
***@nowheres.com (the_blogologist) wrote:
<major snippage>
Post by the_blogologist
Post by John
If you have any suggestions for some relatively safe states in the US
I would be very interested to know.
God's wrath is about to fall on the blue states, I highly recommend
[...]
Post by the_blogologist
Post by John
Arizona,
Terrible place. I wouldn't live there. Very dangerous, too.
Post by the_blogologist
But it's a dry heat, so it feels cooler.
Like hell it does!
Post by the_blogologist
If you look at maps that show
were evaporative coolers work best, they all agree that west of the
Texas - New Mexico boarder is much drier. The humidity makes the heat
feel hotter. I've tried evaporative coolers in Oklahoma and Arizona,
they work MUCH BETTER in Arizona :o/ It's also cooler in the higher
elevations of Arizona.
PLEEEZE don't send any more people to Arizona!!!


Caveat
Shawn Hirn
2006-04-12 13:39:31 UTC
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?
Its a silly question. If this really bothers you, just avoid going to
any area where the five day weather forecast calls for threatening
weather. For example, if a hurricane is headed toward Miami, its not
going to be a surprise (except maybe to FEMA), so just don't go there.
If you want to avoid bad weather in the north, just avoid going there
in the winter. The web site at http://www.weather.com is your friend.
sechumlib
2006-04-12 15:29:41 UTC
Post by Shawn Hirn
Its a silly question. If this really bothers you, just avoid going to
any area where the five day weather forecast calls for threatening
weather. For example, if a hurricane is headed toward Miami, its not
going to be a surprise (except maybe to FEMA), so just don't go there.
If you want to avoid bad weather in the north, just avoid going there
in the winter. The web site at http://www.weather.com is your friend.
Just where do you get off making SENSIBLE comments in this thread?
Can't you tell that the entire purpose thereof is to bring forth
stupid, speculative things?
marika
2006-10-07 22:57:15 UTC
Post by Shawn Hirn
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?
Its a silly question.
I CANNOT believe how wellthis troll worked.
Post by Shawn Hirn
If this really bothers you, just avoid going to
any area where the five day weather forecast calls for threatening
weather.
Really good bites
Post by Shawn Hirn
For example, if a hurricane is headed toward Miami, its not
going to be a surprise (except maybe to FEMA), so just don't go there.
anyway
Post by Shawn Hirn
If you want to avoid bad weather in the north, just avoid going there
in the winter.
in Japan they have gameshows where they punish the loser

punishments have included releasing bees on the loser, making the loser
climb
like 79 flights of stairs and most importantly releasing them into a lake
on a
paperboat
Post by Shawn Hirn
The web site at http://www.weather.com is your friend.
maybe next year we can have a game show like "win John's $" before we set
sail
Harbin Osteen
2006-10-09 03:09:22 UTC
Well, if you are trolling for an opinion, looking at fallout maps,
ground temp maps (for burm home), and alternative energy
prospects, I think I would choose Humboldt County in
Northern California, or someplace close to Durango, Colorado.
--
SeeYaa:) Harbin Osteen KG6URO

When American Citizens with dual citizenship pledges allegiance
to the flag, to which flag do they pledge allegiance too?

-
Post by marika
Post by Shawn Hirn
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?
Its a silly question.
I CANNOT believe how wellthis troll worked.
Post by Shawn Hirn
If this really bothers you, just avoid going to
any area where the five day weather forecast calls for threatening
weather.
Really good bites
Post by Shawn Hirn
For example, if a hurricane is headed toward Miami, its not
going to be a surprise (except maybe to FEMA), so just don't go there.
anyway
Post by Shawn Hirn
If you want to avoid bad weather in the north, just avoid going there
in the winter.
in Japan they have gameshows where they punish the loser
punishments have included releasing bees on the loser, making the loser climb
like 79 flights of stairs and most importantly releasing them into a lake on a
paperboat
Post by Shawn Hirn
The web site at http://www.weather.com is your friend.
maybe next year we can have a game show like "win John's $" before we set sail
Jack Hamilton
2006-10-09 03:52:36 UTC
Post by Harbin Osteen
Well, if you are trolling for an opinion, looking at fallout maps,
ground temp maps (for burm home), and alternative energy
prospects, I think I would choose Humboldt County in
Northern California, or someplace close to Durango, Colorado.
Earthquakes, and possibly tsunamis, in Humboldt.

But very pretty along the coast.
Harbin Osteen
2006-10-09 23:35:19 UTC
Post by Jack Hamilton
Post by Harbin Osteen
Well, if you are trolling for an opinion, looking at fallout maps,
ground temp maps (for burm home), and alternative energy
prospects, I think I would choose Humboldt County in
Northern California, or someplace close to Durango, Colorado.
Earthquakes, and possibly tsunamis, in Humboldt.
But very pretty along the coast.
Hi Jack:
Yea, they could be a prob, but with a burm house (half in the ground, and covered with earth)
would be safe in a earthquake, because it moves with the earth, and building on the south
slope of a hill to take advantage of alternative power should get you above any tsunami.
--
SeeYaa:) Harbin Osteen KG6URO

When American Citizens with dual citizenship pledges allegiance
to the flag, to which flag do they pledge allegiance too?

-
Terryc
2006-10-10 01:44:32 UTC
Post by Harbin Osteen
Yea, they could be a prob, but with a burm house (half in the ground, and covered with earth)
would be safe in a earthquake, because it moves with the earth, and building on the south
slope of a hill to take advantage of alternative power should get you above any tsunami.
I think your assumption is wrong.
Earth quakes travel by pressure waves through the ground.
When the earthquake reaches your house, it is simple going to punch in
the wall on the source side, unless it is sufficently strong (and
massively costly) to effectively resist that force.

AFAIKI, all earthquake design is about resisting the destruction of
building to give people time to evacuate to a "safer" area.
Harbin Osteen
2006-10-11 07:00:30 UTC
Post by Terryc
Post by Harbin Osteen
Yea, they could be a prob, but with a burm house (half in the ground, and covered with earth)
would be safe in a earthquake, because it moves with the earth, and building on the south
slope of a hill to take advantage of alternative power should get you above any tsunami.
I think your assumption is wrong.
Earth quakes travel by pressure waves through the ground.
When the earthquake reaches your house, it is simple going to punch in the wall on the source side, unless it is sufficently
strong (and massively costly) to effectively resist that force.
AFAIKI, all earthquake design is about resisting the destruction of building to give people time to evacuate to a "safer" area.
Hi Terryc:
Your probably right for a structure that is compleatly underground, but
a berm house is only half under ground level, and will have a weaker
interface for the transfer of shear forces, but I need to do more research
on this to see how big of a problem this is.
--
SeeYaa:) Harbin Osteen KG6URO

When American Citizens with dual citizenship pledges allegiance
to the flag, to which flag do they pledge allegiance too?

-
Terryc
2006-10-11 14:11:20 UTC
Post by Harbin Osteen
Your probably right for a structure that is compleatly underground, but
a berm house is only half under ground level, and will have a weaker
interface for the transfer of shear forces, but I need to do more research
on this to see how big of a problem this is.
I suspect a house that consists of individual segments (thick walled
cyclinders?) might might have a better chance of having maximum parts
survive. Might need to re-dig/rebuild a few connecting tunels.

I guess it will depend on your soil strata and water content for a berm
house.

Charles
2006-04-13 04:21:12 UTC
I lived in Northern Delaware for 19 years and do not remember any of the
issues that the OP wrote about. Well, except for a few tornadoes. The
economy is good, housing is fairly reasonable and the education system,
schools, are great. Oh yea, no sales tax.
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?
If for example I wanted to live in the USA, I don't think it would be
a good idea for me to choose Arizona because I have skin that easily
burns. I also wouldn't want to choose somewhere like Maine or
Minnesota where it might be freezing a lot of the time.
I also just had a question about home construction in the US. Whenever
I see images on television of the damage from Tornados and Hurricanes
etc, a lot of the homes that have suffered damage or have been
completely destroyed, it seems that they are mainly constructed of
timber. I don't understand why so many homes in the US especially in
areas were you get a lot of Hurricanes and Tornados at certain times
of the year are constructed of timber. Surely it would be better if
they were constructed of something more solid like big stone?
I have been watching some of the devastation on the news in paces like
Tennessee from the recent tornados. I have also been in the middle of
a Hurricane (Fran) once when I was on holiday in the US and visiting
friends in North Carolina back in 1996 so have seen first hand the
damage that can be done. I have also witnessed massive hailstones that
fell in Pennsylvania when I worked there, and saw all the smashed
windscreens on cars afterwards.
I just wondered what the opinion is of people who work in the
construction industry. Would it help if homes were built of different
materials to timber?
I am also thinking there must be some type of material that can be
used to make car windscreens (windshields) that wouldn't smash if hit
by large hailstone? Maybe some sort of see through plastic/rubber that
the hailstone would just bounce off instead of smashing through? If we
can make bulletproof cars surely making a windscreen that doesn't
smash is also possible?
If you have any suggestions for some relatively safe states in the US
I would be very interested to know.
I am guessing that much of the south and south east can be ruled out
for the Hurricanes and the middle of the country for tornados. The
Western seaboard for the fault line. Places like Texas, Arizona,
Nevada, Southern California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida for the
heat. The North, NW and NE for the freezing temperatures, so that will
remove states like Alaska, Washington, Montana, N&S Dakota, Minnesota,
Wisconsin, Michigan, New York, Maine etc. See my rough map. I'm not
sure if I've done a good job of getting roughly the right areas for
the danger spots? http://tinyurl.com/nt3vm
What's left? Oregon? Hawaii?
John
Mimi
2006-04-13 15:37:20 UTC
Post by Charles
I lived in Northern Delaware for 19 years and do not remember any of the
issues that the OP wrote about. Well, except for a few tornadoes. The
economy is good, housing is fairly reasonable and the education system,
schools, are great. Oh yea, no sales tax.
Isn't Deleware in danger of the occasional hurricane?

Marianne
sechumlib
2006-04-13 16:33:53 UTC
Post by Mimi
Isn't Deleware in danger of the occasional hurricane?
Oh right. When was the last one to hit Delaware (note spelling)? 1961,
Audrey, I think? (But I can't remember for sure, so don't hold me to
that.)

This idea of trying to find a 100% safe, from everything, place to live
is beginning to leave me cold.
Antipodean Bucket Farmer
2006-04-17 07:18:39 UTC
Post by sechumlib
Post by Mimi
Isn't Deleware in danger of the occasional hurricane?
Oh right. When was the last one to hit Delaware (note spelling)? 1961,
Audrey, I think? (But I can't remember for sure, so don't hold me to
that.)
This idea of trying to find a 100% safe, from everything, place to live
is beginning to leave me cold.
I figured this out a long time ago, by observing people who
really fantasised about setting up a totally risk-free life...

The only way to make sure nothing bad ever happens, is to make
sure that nothing at all ever happens. Don't go anywhere, don't
do anything. Don't even leave your house or apartment.
--
Want Freebies?
http://www.TheFreeStuffList.com/
Check The Free Stuff List
pltrgyst
2006-04-17 14:54:36 UTC
On Mon, 17 Apr 2006 00:18:39 -0700, Antipodean Bucket Farmer
Post by Antipodean Bucket Farmer
The only way to make sure nothing bad ever happens, is to make
sure that nothing at all ever happens. Don't go anywhere, don't
do anything. Don't even leave your house or apartment.
...and probably die of radon poisoning.

-- Larry
Laura25
2006-04-18 13:10:11 UTC
The is no safe place in the US ! We will probably die of a hard attack due
to bad food (I mean fast food). My advise go to Québec, Canada, it might be
a bit cold in the winter but you will eat well.
Post by Charles
I lived in Northern Delaware for 19 years and do not remember any of the
issues that the OP wrote about. Well, except for a few tornadoes. The
economy is good, housing is fairly reasonable and the education system,
schools, are great. Oh yea, no sales tax.
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?
If for example I wanted to live in the USA, I don't think it would be
a good idea for me to choose Arizona because I have skin that easily
burns. I also wouldn't want to choose somewhere like Maine or
Minnesota where it might be freezing a lot of the time.
I also just had a question about home construction in the US. Whenever
I see images on television of the damage from Tornados and Hurricanes
etc, a lot of the homes that have suffered damage or have been
completely destroyed, it seems that they are mainly constructed of
timber. I don't understand why so many homes in the US especially in
areas were you get a lot of Hurricanes and Tornados at certain times
of the year are constructed of timber. Surely it would be better if
they were constructed of something more solid like big stone?
I have been watching some of the devastation on the news in paces like
Tennessee from the recent tornados. I have also been in the middle of
a Hurricane (Fran) once when I was on holiday in the US and visiting
friends in North Carolina back in 1996 so have seen first hand the
damage that can be done. I have also witnessed massive hailstones that
fell in Pennsylvania when I worked there, and saw all the smashed
windscreens on cars afterwards.
I just wondered what the opinion is of people who work in the
construction industry. Would it help if homes were built of different
materials to timber?
I am also thinking there must be some type of material that can be
used to make car windscreens (windshields) that wouldn't smash if hit
by large hailstone? Maybe some sort of see through plastic/rubber that
the hailstone would just bounce off instead of smashing through? If we
can make bulletproof cars surely making a windscreen that doesn't
smash is also possible?
If you have any suggestions for some relatively safe states in the US
I would be very interested to know.
I am guessing that much of the south and south east can be ruled out
for the Hurricanes and the middle of the country for tornados. The
Western seaboard for the fault line. Places like Texas, Arizona,
Nevada, Southern California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida for the
heat. The North, NW and NE for the freezing temperatures, so that will
remove states like Alaska, Washington, Montana, N&S Dakota, Minnesota,
Wisconsin, Michigan, New York, Maine etc. See my rough map. I'm not
sure if I've done a good job of getting roughly the right areas for
the danger spots? http://tinyurl.com/nt3vm
What's left? Oregon? Hawaii?
John
sechumlib
2006-04-18 20:10:17 UTC
Post by Laura25
The is no safe place in the US ! We will probably die of a hard attack
due to bad food (I mean fast food). My advise go to Québec, Canada, it
might be a bit cold in the winter but you will eat well.
Yes, but it may kill you! Some of that GREAT food will raise your
cholesterol count like crazy.

We just got back from a 2-day visit to Quebec and ate like kings, so I
know whereof I speak!
Frank F. Matthews
2006-04-19 16:16:42 UTC
Since the OP was concerned about the cold even in the northern US I
suspect that Quebec is out.
Post by Laura25
The is no safe place in the US ! We will probably die of a hard attack due
to bad food (I mean fast food). My advise go to Québec, Canada, it might be
a bit cold in the winter but you will eat well.
Post by Charles
I lived in Northern Delaware for 19 years and do not remember any of the
issues that the OP wrote about. Well, except for a few tornadoes. The
economy is good, housing is fairly reasonable and the education system,
schools, are great. Oh yea, no sales tax.
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?
If for example I wanted to live in the USA, I don't think it would be
a good idea for me to choose Arizona because I have skin that easily
burns. I also wouldn't want to choose somewhere like Maine or
Minnesota where it might be freezing a lot of the time.
I also just had a question about home construction in the US. Whenever
I see images on television of the damage from Tornados and Hurricanes
etc, a lot of the homes that have suffered damage or have been
completely destroyed, it seems that they are mainly constructed of
timber. I don't understand why so many homes in the US especially in
areas were you get a lot of Hurricanes and Tornados at certain times
of the year are constructed of timber. Surely it would be better if
they were constructed of something more solid like big stone?
I have been watching some of the devastation on the news in paces like
Tennessee from the recent tornados. I have also been in the middle of
a Hurricane (Fran) once when I was on holiday in the US and visiting
friends in North Carolina back in 1996 so have seen first hand the
damage that can be done. I have also witnessed massive hailstones that
fell in Pennsylvania when I worked there, and saw all the smashed
windscreens on cars afterwards.
I just wondered what the opinion is of people who work in the
construction industry. Would it help if homes were built of different
materials to timber?
I am also thinking there must be some type of material that can be
used to make car windscreens (windshields) that wouldn't smash if hit
by large hailstone? Maybe some sort of see through plastic/rubber that
the hailstone would just bounce off instead of smashing through? If we
can make bulletproof cars surely making a windscreen that doesn't
smash is also possible?
If you have any suggestions for some relatively safe states in the US
I would be very interested to know.
I am guessing that much of the south and south east can be ruled out
for the Hurricanes and the middle of the country for tornados. The
Western seaboard for the fault line. Places like Texas, Arizona,
Nevada, Southern California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida for the
heat. The North, NW and NE for the freezing temperatures, so that will
remove states like Alaska, Washington, Montana, N&S Dakota, Minnesota,
Wisconsin, Michigan, New York, Maine etc. See my rough map. I'm not
sure if I've done a good job of getting roughly the right areas for
the danger spots? http://tinyurl.com/nt3vm
What's left? Oregon? Hawaii?
John
dave
2006-04-29 23:37:43 UTC
How about Dick Chaney's "undisclosed" location? That seems pretty safe
Post by Frank F. Matthews
Since the OP was concerned about the cold even in the northern US I
suspect that Quebec is out.
Post by Laura25
The is no safe place in the US ! We will probably die of a hard attack
due to bad food (I mean fast food). My advise go to Québec, Canada, it
might be a bit cold in the winter but you will eat well.
Post by Charles
I lived in Northern Delaware for 19 years and do not remember any of the
issues that the OP wrote about. Well, except for a few tornadoes. The
economy is good, housing is fairly reasonable and the education system,
schools, are great. Oh yea, no sales tax.
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?
If for example I wanted to live in the USA, I don't think it would be
a good idea for me to choose Arizona because I have skin that easily
burns. I also wouldn't want to choose somewhere like Maine or
Minnesota where it might be freezing a lot of the time.
I also just had a question about home construction in the US. Whenever
I see images on television of the damage from Tornados and Hurricanes
etc, a lot of the homes that have suffered damage or have been
completely destroyed, it seems that they are mainly constructed of
timber. I don't understand why so many homes in the US especially in
areas were you get a lot of Hurricanes and Tornados at certain times
of the year are constructed of timber. Surely it would be better if
they were constructed of something more solid like big stone?
I have been watching some of the devastation on the news in paces like
Tennessee from the recent tornados. I have also been in the middle of
a Hurricane (Fran) once when I was on holiday in the US and visiting
friends in North Carolina back in 1996 so have seen first hand the
damage that can be done. I have also witnessed massive hailstones that
fell in Pennsylvania when I worked there, and saw all the smashed
windscreens on cars afterwards.
I just wondered what the opinion is of people who work in the
construction industry. Would it help if homes were built of different
materials to timber?
I am also thinking there must be some type of material that can be
used to make car windscreens (windshields) that wouldn't smash if hit
by large hailstone? Maybe some sort of see through plastic/rubber that
the hailstone would just bounce off instead of smashing through? If we
can make bulletproof cars surely making a windscreen that doesn't
smash is also possible?
If you have any suggestions for some relatively safe states in the US
I would be very interested to know.
I am guessing that much of the south and south east can be ruled out
for the Hurricanes and the middle of the country for tornados. The
Western seaboard for the fault line. Places like Texas, Arizona,
Nevada, Southern California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida for the
heat. The North, NW and NE for the freezing temperatures, so that will
remove states like Alaska, Washington, Montana, N&S Dakota, Minnesota,
Wisconsin, Michigan, New York, Maine etc. See my rough map. I'm not
sure if I've done a good job of getting roughly the right areas for
the danger spots? http://tinyurl.com/nt3vm
What's left? Oregon? Hawaii?
John
NapalmHeart
2006-04-30 16:50:52 UTC
----- Original Message -----
From: "Laura25" <***@nomail.com>
Newsgroups:
alt.building.construction,alt.disasters,alt.trades.construction.us,alt.survival,alt.construction,alt.talk.weather,rec.travel.usa-canada
Sent: Tuesday, April 18, 2006 9:10 AM
Subject: Re: Safest Places in the US? DELAWARE
Post by Laura25
The is no safe place in the US ! We will probably die of a hard attack due
to bad food (I mean fast food). My advise go to Québec, Canada, it might
be a bit cold in the winter but you will eat well.
Would the "hard attack" come from an OD of Cialis? ;+)>
Derek F
2006-04-30 18:43:43 UTC
Post by NapalmHeart
----- Original Message -----
alt.building.construction,alt.disasters,alt.trades.construction.us,alt.survival,alt.construction,alt.talk.weather,rec.travel.usa-canada
Sent: Tuesday, April 18, 2006 9:10 AM
Subject: Re: Safest Places in the US? DELAWARE
Post by Laura25
The is no safe place in the US ! We will probably die of a hard attack
due to bad food (I mean fast food). My advise go to Québec, Canada, it
might be a bit cold in the winter but you will eat well.
The Nouveau Cuisine or the French Frys from vans on the streets.
Derek.
Gunner
2006-04-30 23:16:26 UTC
Post by NapalmHeart
----- Original Message -----
alt.building.construction,alt.disasters,alt.trades.construction.us,alt.survival,alt.construction,alt.talk.weather,rec.travel.usa-canada
Sent: Tuesday, April 18, 2006 9:10 AM
Subject: Re: Safest Places in the US? DELAWARE
Post by Laura25
The is no safe place in the US ! We will probably die of a hard attack due
to bad food (I mean fast food). My advise go to Québec, Canada, it might
be a bit cold in the winter but you will eat well.
Would the "hard attack" come from an OD of Cialis? ;+)>
Assault with a friendly weapon?


"I think this is because of your belief in biological Marxism.
As a genetic communist you feel that noticing behavioural
patterns relating to race would cause a conflict with your belief
in biological Marxism." Big Pete, famous Usenet Racist
"Mr. Fedora" pacbell.net>
2006-05-30 07:53:36 UTC
<flame on>

Have you ever heard the term "threat assessment"? It is simply stated as
ratio the probability of an event occurring against the severity of the
damage if it occurs.

Threat assessments allow a few hundred dollars for safety in automobiles,
versus several million dollars for safety in nuclear power plants.

Homes could be built of re-enforced concrete and steel, but 98% of the
people who need them could not afford to buy them. That is also why
disasters in developing countries are magnified by the secondary damage by
collapsing structures and infra-structures (e.g. bridges, roads). This is a
country of 300 million, plus. If you were to use a high estimate of the
number of people directly affected by natural disasters in 5 years as 5
million (Hurricanes, forest fires, tornados, earthquakes), it is still a
surprisingly small portion of the populace. Most people in this country
live their entire lives, or generations of lives, without any direct
involvement with the "6 o'clock News".

Besides, life is never risk free. It you find such a place, go there, but
be quiet about it. It is the risks, dangers, and uncertainties of life and
living that gives meaning to a life. Foolish risks are usually rewarded by
having your gaming piece removed from the table, but the rest of us are
doing ok.

<flame off>
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?
If for example I wanted to live in the USA, I don't think it would be
a good idea for me to choose Arizona because I have skin that easily
burns. I also wouldn't want to choose somewhere like Maine or
Minnesota where it might be freezing a lot of the time.
I also just had a question about home construction in the US. Whenever
I see images on television of the damage from Tornados and Hurricanes
etc, a lot of the homes that have suffered damage or have been
completely destroyed, it seems that they are mainly constructed of
timber. I don't understand why so many homes in the US especially in
areas were you get a lot of Hurricanes and Tornados at certain times
of the year are constructed of timber. Surely it would be better if
they were constructed of something more solid like big stone?
I have been watching some of the devastation on the news in paces like
Tennessee from the recent tornados. I have also been in the middle of
a Hurricane (Fran) once when I was on holiday in the US and visiting
friends in North Carolina back in 1996 so have seen first hand the
damage that can be done. I have also witnessed massive hailstones that
fell in Pennsylvania when I worked there, and saw all the smashed
windscreens on cars afterwards.
I just wondered what the opinion is of people who work in the
construction industry. Would it help if homes were built of different
materials to timber?
I am also thinking there must be some type of material that can be
used to make car windscreens (windshields) that wouldn't smash if hit
by large hailstone? Maybe some sort of see through plastic/rubber that
the hailstone would just bounce off instead of smashing through? If we
can make bulletproof cars surely making a windscreen that doesn't
smash is also possible?
If you have any suggestions for some relatively safe states in the US
I would be very interested to know.
I am guessing that much of the south and south east can be ruled out
for the Hurricanes and the middle of the country for tornados. The
Western seaboard for the fault line. Places like Texas, Arizona,
Nevada, Southern California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida for the
heat. The North, NW and NE for the freezing temperatures, so that will
remove states like Alaska, Washington, Montana, N&S Dakota, Minnesota,
Wisconsin, Michigan, New York, Maine etc. See my rough map. I'm not
sure if I've done a good job of getting roughly the right areas for
the danger spots? http://tinyurl.com/nt3vm
What's left? Oregon? Hawaii?
John