(too old to reply)
Safest Places in the US?
John
2006-04-09 01:02:23 UTC
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?

When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?

If for example I wanted to live in the USA, I don't think it would be
a good idea for me to choose Arizona because I have skin that easily
burns. I also wouldn't want to choose somewhere like Maine or
Minnesota where it might be freezing a lot of the time.

I also just had a question about home construction in the US. Whenever
I see images on television of the damage from Tornados and Hurricanes
etc, a lot of the homes that have suffered damage or have been
completely destroyed, it seems that they are mainly constructed of
timber. I don't understand why so many homes in the US especially in
areas were you get a lot of Hurricanes and Tornados at certain times
of the year are constructed of timber. Surely it would be better if
they were constructed of something more solid like big stone?

I have been watching some of the devastation on the news in paces like
Tennessee from the recent tornados. I have also been in the middle of
a Hurricane (Fran) once when I was on holiday in the US and visiting
friends in North Carolina back in 1996 so have seen first hand the
damage that can be done. I have also witnessed massive hailstones that
fell in Pennsylvania when I worked there, and saw all the smashed
windscreens on cars afterwards.

I just wondered what the opinion is of people who work in the
construction industry. Would it help if homes were built of different
materials to timber?

I am also thinking there must be some type of material that can be
used to make car windscreens (windshields) that wouldn't smash if hit
by large hailstone? Maybe some sort of see through plastic/rubber that
the hailstone would just bounce off instead of smashing through? If we
can make bulletproof cars surely making a windscreen that doesn't
smash is also possible?

If you have any suggestions for some relatively safe states in the US
I would be very interested to know.

I am guessing that much of the south and south east can be ruled out
for the Hurricanes and the middle of the country for tornados. The
Western seaboard for the fault line. Places like Texas, Arizona,
Nevada, Southern California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida for the
heat. The North, NW and NE for the freezing temperatures, so that will
remove states like Alaska, Washington, Montana, N&S Dakota, Minnesota,
Wisconsin, Michigan, New York, Maine etc. See my rough map. I'm not
sure if I've done a good job of getting roughly the right areas for
the danger spots? http://tinyurl.com/nt3vm

What's left? Oregon? Hawaii?

John
David Bennetts
2006-04-09 01:39:37 UTC
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?
If for example I wanted to live in the USA, I don't think it would be
a good idea for me to choose Arizona because I have skin that easily
burns. I also wouldn't want to choose somewhere like Maine or
Minnesota where it might be freezing a lot of the time.
I also just had a question about home construction in the US. Whenever
I see images on television of the damage from Tornados and Hurricanes
etc, a lot of the homes that have suffered damage or have been
completely destroyed, it seems that they are mainly constructed of
timber. I don't understand why so many homes in the US especially in
areas were you get a lot of Hurricanes and Tornados at certain times
of the year are constructed of timber. Surely it would be better if
they were constructed of something more solid like big stone?
I have been watching some of the devastation on the news in paces like
Tennessee from the recent tornados. I have also been in the middle of
a Hurricane (Fran) once when I was on holiday in the US and visiting
friends in North Carolina back in 1996 so have seen first hand the
damage that can be done. I have also witnessed massive hailstones that
fell in Pennsylvania when I worked there, and saw all the smashed
windscreens on cars afterwards.
I just wondered what the opinion is of people who work in the
construction industry. Would it help if homes were built of different
materials to timber?
I am also thinking there must be some type of material that can be
used to make car windscreens (windshields) that wouldn't smash if hit
by large hailstone? Maybe some sort of see through plastic/rubber that
the hailstone would just bounce off instead of smashing through? If we
can make bulletproof cars surely making a windscreen that doesn't
smash is also possible?
If you have any suggestions for some relatively safe states in the US
I would be very interested to know.
I am guessing that much of the south and south east can be ruled out
for the Hurricanes and the middle of the country for tornados. The
Western seaboard for the fault line. Places like Texas, Arizona,
Nevada, Southern California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida for the
heat. The North, NW and NE for the freezing temperatures, so that will
remove states like Alaska, Washington, Montana, N&S Dakota, Minnesota,
Wisconsin, Michigan, New York, Maine etc. See my rough map. I'm not
sure if I've done a good job of getting roughly the right areas for
the danger spots? http://tinyurl.com/nt3vm
What's left? Oregon? Hawaii?
John
Rule those out - Oregon has too many forest fires and too many trees, you
might get burnt or a tree might fall on you. Hawaii has volcanoes and big
waves, either may kill you. I don't think there's anywhere left in the USA
for you. You'll have to emigrate.

Regards

David Bennetts
Australia
clintonG
2006-04-09 01:40:12 UTC
You may be interested in what Joel Skousen has written and talks about [1].

<%= Clinton Gallagher
NET csgallagher AT metromilwaukee.com
URL http://clintongallagher.metromilwaukee.com/

[1] http://www.joelskousen.com/
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?
If for example I wanted to live in the USA, I don't think it would be
a good idea for me to choose Arizona because I have skin that easily
burns. I also wouldn't want to choose somewhere like Maine or
Minnesota where it might be freezing a lot of the time.
I also just had a question about home construction in the US. Whenever
I see images on television of the damage from Tornados and Hurricanes
etc, a lot of the homes that have suffered damage or have been
completely destroyed, it seems that they are mainly constructed of
timber. I don't understand why so many homes in the US especially in
areas were you get a lot of Hurricanes and Tornados at certain times
of the year are constructed of timber. Surely it would be better if
they were constructed of something more solid like big stone?
I have been watching some of the devastation on the news in paces like
Tennessee from the recent tornados. I have also been in the middle of
a Hurricane (Fran) once when I was on holiday in the US and visiting
friends in North Carolina back in 1996 so have seen first hand the
damage that can be done. I have also witnessed massive hailstones that
fell in Pennsylvania when I worked there, and saw all the smashed
windscreens on cars afterwards.
I just wondered what the opinion is of people who work in the
construction industry. Would it help if homes were built of different
materials to timber?
I am also thinking there must be some type of material that can be
used to make car windscreens (windshields) that wouldn't smash if hit
by large hailstone? Maybe some sort of see through plastic/rubber that
the hailstone would just bounce off instead of smashing through? If we
can make bulletproof cars surely making a windscreen that doesn't
smash is also possible?
If you have any suggestions for some relatively safe states in the US
I would be very interested to know.
I am guessing that much of the south and south east can be ruled out
for the Hurricanes and the middle of the country for tornados. The
Western seaboard for the fault line. Places like Texas, Arizona,
Nevada, Southern California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida for the
heat. The North, NW and NE for the freezing temperatures, so that will
remove states like Alaska, Washington, Montana, N&S Dakota, Minnesota,
Wisconsin, Michigan, New York, Maine etc. See my rough map. I'm not
sure if I've done a good job of getting roughly the right areas for
the danger spots? http://tinyurl.com/nt3vm
What's left? Oregon? Hawaii?
John
Weatherlawyer
2006-04-09 02:55:18 UTC
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
I think the 4 horsemen of the feckuplyss are pretty well covering
Chimpzillandwana at the moment.

Come to Britain: http://www.werenotafraid.com/images/765/index.html
DT
2006-04-09 03:53:08 UTC
In article <***@4ax.com>, ***@Sam.com
says...
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
Ohio. No deadly creatures, either. Some cold weather, but the southern part of
the state is much warmer than along Lake Erie where I live. Very affordable
housing. Jobs. Ohio.

--
Dennis
Ken
2006-04-09 04:08:53 UTC
Post by John
When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?
Who cares? You're much more likely to be killed in a traffic accident than
any of those things. Of natuaral disasters, doesn't heat kill more people
than all those other things?
pltrgyst
2006-04-09 05:19:27 UTC
.... Jobs. Ohio.
Really? There seem to be a lot of unemployed Ohioans complaining about the job
situation on Usenet. Not as bas as West Virginia, but they make it sound close.

-- Larry
Hank Sniadoch
2006-04-09 03:44:07 UTC
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?
If for example I wanted to live in the USA, I don't think it would be
a good idea for me to choose Arizona because I have skin that easily
burns. I also wouldn't want to choose somewhere like Maine or
Minnesota where it might be freezing a lot of the time.
I also just had a question about home construction in the US. Whenever
I see images on television of the damage from Tornados and Hurricanes
etc, a lot of the homes that have suffered damage or have been
completely destroyed, it seems that they are mainly constructed of
timber. I don't understand why so many homes in the US especially in
areas were you get a lot of Hurricanes and Tornados at certain times
of the year are constructed of timber. Surely it would be better if
they were constructed of something more solid like big stone?
I have been watching some of the devastation on the news in paces like
Tennessee from the recent tornados. I have also been in the middle of
a Hurricane (Fran) once when I was on holiday in the US and visiting
friends in North Carolina back in 1996 so have seen first hand the
damage that can be done. I have also witnessed massive hailstones that
fell in Pennsylvania when I worked there, and saw all the smashed
windscreens on cars afterwards.
I just wondered what the opinion is of people who work in the
construction industry. Would it help if homes were built of different
materials to timber?
I am also thinking there must be some type of material that can be
used to make car windscreens (windshields) that wouldn't smash if hit
by large hailstone? Maybe some sort of see through plastic/rubber that
the hailstone would just bounce off instead of smashing through? If we
can make bulletproof cars surely making a windscreen that doesn't
smash is also possible?
If you have any suggestions for some relatively safe states in the US
I would be very interested to know.
I am guessing that much of the south and south east can be ruled out
for the Hurricanes and the middle of the country for tornados. The
Western seaboard for the fault line. Places like Texas, Arizona,
Nevada, Southern California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida for the
heat. The North, NW and NE for the freezing temperatures, so that will
remove states like Alaska, Washington, Montana, N&S Dakota, Minnesota,
Wisconsin, Michigan, New York, Maine etc. See my rough map. I'm not
sure if I've done a good job of getting roughly the right areas for
the danger spots? http://tinyurl.com/nt3vm
What's left? Oregon? Hawaii?
John
Yes.
bookburn
2006-04-09 08:08:06 UTC
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?
You should add up all your categories of danger and summarize as just: Where
is it that I can walk outside without fear? I hear that communist countries
are/were relatively safe. Not sure if Cuba is safe. Japan is safe. Probably
Switzerland is safe.

I recently read a novel where the central character was saying that when he
lived in Africa, Burma and India he felt all the people were very innocent and
safe. But maybe he was just that kind of person bookburn
Frank F. Matthews
2006-04-09 15:39:56 UTC
Your map shows the line for cold as much too far north. It shows the
line for hurricanes as much too coastal. Your earthquake area should
show almost all of the US except for a bit of coastal TX and part of
FLA. You left out Tsunamis, sink holes, & volcanos.

Basically your best bet is to die young.
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
When I say "safe" I mean the safest states from dangers such as
natural disasters like Hurricanes, Tornados, Earthquakes, Floods, Wild
Fires, Grapefruit sized hailstones, Severe Weather etc, as well as
from crime, gangs and things like that?
If for example I wanted to live in the USA, I don't think it would be
a good idea for me to choose Arizona because I have skin that easily
burns. I also wouldn't want to choose somewhere like Maine or
Minnesota where it might be freezing a lot of the time.
I also just had a question about home construction in the US. Whenever
I see images on television of the damage from Tornados and Hurricanes
etc, a lot of the homes that have suffered damage or have been
completely destroyed, it seems that they are mainly constructed of
timber. I don't understand why so many homes in the US especially in
areas were you get a lot of Hurricanes and Tornados at certain times
of the year are constructed of timber. Surely it would be better if
they were constructed of something more solid like big stone?
I have been watching some of the devastation on the news in paces like
Tennessee from the recent tornados. I have also been in the middle of
a Hurricane (Fran) once when I was on holiday in the US and visiting
friends in North Carolina back in 1996 so have seen first hand the
damage that can be done. I have also witnessed massive hailstones that
fell in Pennsylvania when I worked there, and saw all the smashed
windscreens on cars afterwards.
I just wondered what the opinion is of people who work in the
construction industry. Would it help if homes were built of different
materials to timber?
I am also thinking there must be some type of material that can be
used to make car windscreens (windshields) that wouldn't smash if hit
by large hailstone? Maybe some sort of see through plastic/rubber that
the hailstone would just bounce off instead of smashing through? If we
can make bulletproof cars surely making a windscreen that doesn't
smash is also possible?
If you have any suggestions for some relatively safe states in the US
I would be very interested to know.
I am guessing that much of the south and south east can be ruled out
for the Hurricanes and the middle of the country for tornados. The
Western seaboard for the fault line. Places like Texas, Arizona,
Nevada, Southern California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida for the
heat. The North, NW and NE for the freezing temperatures, so that will
remove states like Alaska, Washington, Montana, N&S Dakota, Minnesota,
Wisconsin, Michigan, New York, Maine etc. See my rough map. I'm not
sure if I've done a good job of getting roughly the right areas for
the danger spots? http://tinyurl.com/nt3vm
What's left? Oregon? Hawaii?
John
John
2006-04-09 15:53:56 UTC
On Sun, 09 Apr 2006 01:40:12 GMT, "clintonG"
Post by clintonG
You may be interested in what Joel Skousen has written and talks about [1].
<%= Clinton Gallagher
NET csgallagher AT metromilwaukee.com
URL http://clintongallagher.metromilwaukee.com/
[1] http://www.joelskousen.com/
Thanks for that link. It is a very interesting site.

I think a lot of it mainly centres on safe places away from Nuclear
targets. A lot of those places that the site lists some are in the
North in areas where it gets really cold; Boise ID, Provo-Orem UT,
Grand Rapids MI. There's one in Oregon where someone mentions that
there are forest fires. One in California. I'm not sure though
whether Santa Rosa is near the fault line and will suffer from
Earthquakes or Wild Fires? One place in Texas and Nevada, which would
probably be too hot for me. Then you have others in the Hurricane
belt, North and South Carolina.

John
John
2006-04-09 15:53:33 UTC
Post by David Bennetts
Rule those out - Oregon has too many forest fires and too many trees, you
might get burnt or a tree might fall on you. Hawaii has volcanoes and big
waves, either may kill you. I don't think there's anywhere left in the USA
for you. You'll have to emigrate.
Regards
David Bennetts
Australia
I don't currently live in the States. I was just curious about what
parts of the US people consider to be the safest. I have worked there
for a short period of time and been on holiday and spent a fair amount
of time there.

I have also been on holiday to Australia twice. Sydney and Queensland
the first time, and Melbourne, Phillip Island and the Great Ocean Rd
the second time. I can also rule out Sydney for those fires as well,
plus those Funnel Webs Spiders and Sharks swimming up the
river ;)

I live in the UK, and am mainly just thinking about this for when I
retire (a long way off yet). But you never know, perhaps I may
emigrate to somewhere else from the UK.

John
Glenn
2006-04-09 16:07:55 UTC
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
I like Kansas. Supposedly the tornado alley state but I am 75 and have
never seen one. Does happen sometimes but so do car accidents.

If you chose to live in a forest, you know darned well sometime there will
be a forest fire. Not if but a certainty.

On the coast, especially east, you know you will have hurricanes
occasionally, not maybe but a certainty.

Live in the mountains and there is a good chance a rock slide or forest fire
will get you.

I'll take the good old boring central states
Dave Smith
2006-04-09 16:43:00 UTC
Post by Glenn
I like Kansas. Supposedly the tornado alley state but I am 75 and have
never seen one. Does happen sometimes but so do car accidents.
If you chose to live in a forest, you know darned well sometime there will
be a forest fire. Not if but a certainty.
On the coast, especially east, you know you will have hurricanes
occasionally, not maybe but a certainty.
Live in the mountains and there is a good chance a rock slide or forest fire
will get you.
I'll take the good old boring central states
I realize that southern Ontario doesn't qualify since it is not in the US, but
is is relatively hazard free. The last bad blizzard we had was almost 30 years
ago. Every ten years or so there is a small hurricane that comes along and
knocks over a few trees and takes off a roof . The last hurricane that hit here
with any force was Hurricane Hazel in 1954. We don't get volcanos, earthquakes,
floods. It doesn't get extremely hot or extremely cold. It's pretty safe and
boring. Most of us are doomed to die of old age.
gman99
2006-04-09 18:13:07 UTC
Post by Dave Smith
Post by Glenn
I like Kansas. Supposedly the tornado alley state but I am 75 and have
never seen one. Does happen sometimes but so do car accidents.
If you chose to live in a forest, you know darned well sometime there will
be a forest fire. Not if but a certainty.
On the coast, especially east, you know you will have hurricanes
occasionally, not maybe but a certainty.
Live in the mountains and there is a good chance a rock slide or forest fire
will get you.
I'll take the good old boring central states
I realize that southern Ontario doesn't qualify since it is not in the US, but
is is relatively hazard free. The last bad blizzard we had was almost 30 years
ago. Every ten years or so there is a small hurricane that comes along and
knocks over a few trees and takes off a roof . The last hurricane that hit here
with any force was Hurricane Hazel in 1954. We don't get volcanos, earthquakes,
floods. It doesn't get extremely hot or extremely cold. It's pretty safe and
boring. Most of us are doomed to die of old age.
Yes but then the smog is somewhat hazardous to ones health as is an
increased risk of tornados...there are also heat spells. If you're
thinking Canada the best climate is probably southern NS. No extreme
cold or heat...little snow. There is a very small risk of hurricanes
reaching the area...the weather on the west coast is a bit better but
then they are on the brink of falling into the ocean by the 'big one'
or being swamped by a tsunami.
Gunner
2006-04-09 18:53:24 UTC
Post by DT
says...
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
Ohio. No deadly creatures, either. Some cold weather, but the southern part of
the state is much warmer than along Lake Erie where I live. Very affordable
housing. Jobs. Ohio.
New Madrid Fault is expected to go off anytime now

Gunner

"I think this is because of your belief in biological Marxism.
As a genetic communist you feel that noticing behavioural
patterns relating to race would cause a conflict with your belief
in biological Marxism." Big Pete, famous Usenet Racist
Gunner
2006-04-09 19:07:44 UTC
Post by Glenn
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
I like Kansas. Supposedly the tornado alley state but I am 75 and have
never seen one. Does happen sometimes but so do car accidents.
If you chose to live in a forest, you know darned well sometime there will
be a forest fire. Not if but a certainty.
On the coast, especially east, you know you will have hurricanes
occasionally, not maybe but a certainty.
Live in the mountains and there is a good chance a rock slide or forest fire
will get you.
I'll take the good old boring central states
Something to consider..is not how safe an area is from natural
disasters...but how well prepared the area/infrastructure for those
emergencies.

I live 5 miles as the crow flies from the San Andreas fault, here in
California. We have small earthquakes every couple days or so..but
most are never felt. I did however lose a home to an earthquake in
1983. The entire town was leveled..but there were only a very few
injuries, and 1 death..and to this day..Im not sure it wasnt a
homicide of opportunity IRRC.

Its been 20 + yrs, the town was rebuilt to modern building codes for
earthquake standards..not the 19th century as it originally was..and I
doubt there were be much serious damage after an equivelant
earthquake. My current home has been hardened against
earthquakes..and if one occurs...the home and infrastructure simply
sways and rides it out. Im more concerned about a couple of my larger
top heavy machine tools in my home hobby shop falling over than losing
the house and grounds.

Good weather, not prone to forest fires here in the desert, no
tornados, no hurricanes, no floods at my elevation etc, limited crime,
no gangs other than a couple local wanna be's, far enough off the
beaten track to not be an attractive destination for hordes of spikey
haired cannible mutants after something really bad in the LA area,
its a heavily armed Red Zone, and local oilfields can provide energy,
fuel and water to the area. Good well hardened hospitals and
emergency services..simply because they have had lots of experience
with earthquakes in the past and have built to counter the issue in
the future, etc etc.

So its not necessarily a state by state comparison that is valid, but
an area by area look that needs to be done.

Gunner

"I think this is because of your belief in biological Marxism.
As a genetic communist you feel that noticing behavioural
patterns relating to race would cause a conflict with your belief
in biological Marxism." Big Pete, famous Usenet Racist
Dave Smith
2006-04-09 19:18:30 UTC
Post by gman99
Post by Dave Smith
I realize that southern Ontario doesn't qualify since it is not in the US, but
is is relatively hazard free. The last bad blizzard we had was almost 30 years
ago. Every ten years or so there is a small hurricane that comes along and
knocks over a few trees and takes off a roof . The last hurricane that hit here
with any force was Hurricane Hazel in 1954. We don't get volcanos, earthquakes,
floods. It doesn't get extremely hot or extremely cold. It's pretty safe and
boring. Most of us are doomed to die of old age.
Yes but then the smog is somewhat hazardous to ones health as is an
increased risk of tornados...there are also heat spells. If you're
thinking Canada the best climate is probably southern NS. No extreme
cold or heat...little snow. There is a very small risk of hurricanes
reaching the area...the weather on the west coast is a bit better but
then they are on the brink of falling into the ocean by the 'big one'
or being swamped by a tsunami.
Smog is not a problem where I live. Our hot spells seem hot relative to the rest of
our weather, but what we call a heat spell some people would consider to be normal
summer weather. It rarely gets into the 90s. The west coast is incredibly beautiful
and seldom gets really cold. The rain gets depressing, and there is that threat of
drifting apart from the rest of the continent.
Robert
2006-04-09 22:43:15 UTC
Post by DT
says...
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
Ohio. No deadly creatures, either. Some cold weather, but the southern part of
the state is much warmer than along Lake Erie where I live. Very affordable
housing. Jobs. Ohio.
--
Dennis
Ohio = heat, humidity, flat, tornadoes

Robert
Hatunen
2006-04-09 23:41:32 UTC
Post by DT
says...
Post by John
I just wondered what states people would regard as being some of the
safest places to live in the USA?
Ohio. No deadly creatures, either.
But Ohio has tornados. And some nast squall lines off Lake Erie.


************* DAVE HATUNEN (***@cox.net) *************
* Tucson Arizona, out where the cacti grow *
* My typos & mispellings are intentional copyright traps *

Next Page >
Page 1 of 5