Discussion:
Best survival preparation lists
(too old to reply)
h***@nospam.org
2007-11-04 16:06:55 UTC
Permalink
Making the list. Checkin' it twice. Been laying up food and supplies
for years. Haven't seen a good comprehensive list in awhile to see
what I am forgetting. Suggestions to links to some good sites and
lists appreciated.
Frank Gilliland
2007-11-04 16:18:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@nospam.org
Making the list. Checkin' it twice. Been laying up food and supplies
for years. Haven't seen a good comprehensive list in awhile to see
what I am forgetting.
An ardent proponent of caffeine but can't remember what you should
stock?
Post by h***@nospam.org
Suggestions to links to some good sites and
lists appreciated.
Kick back and have a cup of coffee -- I'm sure you'll remember out how
to use google.
h***@nospam.org
2007-11-04 16:54:24 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 04 Nov 2007 08:18:50 -0800, Frank Gilliland
Post by Frank Gilliland
Post by h***@nospam.org
Making the list. Checkin' it twice. Been laying up food and supplies
for years. Haven't seen a good comprehensive list in awhile to see
what I am forgetting.
An ardent proponent of caffeine but can't remember what you should
stock?
Post by h***@nospam.org
Suggestions to links to some good sites and
lists appreciated.
Kick back and have a cup of coffee -- I'm sure you'll remember out how
to use google.
these lists are for sharing ideas. Too bad you don't have any
Frank Gilliland
2007-11-04 17:45:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@nospam.org
On Sun, 04 Nov 2007 08:18:50 -0800, Frank Gilliland
Post by Frank Gilliland
Post by h***@nospam.org
Making the list. Checkin' it twice. Been laying up food and supplies
for years. Haven't seen a good comprehensive list in awhile to see
what I am forgetting.
An ardent proponent of caffeine but can't remember what you should
stock?
Post by h***@nospam.org
Suggestions to links to some good sites and
lists appreciated.
Kick back and have a cup of coffee -- I'm sure you'll remember out how
to use google.
these lists are for sharing ideas. Too bad you don't have any
But I do. One of them was to avoid caffeine. You chimed in with how
great coffee is in a survival situation, and cited some half-assed
study done by "knowledge management" experts and funded by pork-barrel
spending. Looks like they did a good job -- why don't you ask THEM
what you should have on your list?
h***@nospam.org
2007-11-04 21:09:58 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 04 Nov 2007 09:45:20 -0800, Frank Gilliland
Post by Frank Gilliland
Post by h***@nospam.org
On Sun, 04 Nov 2007 08:18:50 -0800, Frank Gilliland
Post by Frank Gilliland
Post by h***@nospam.org
Making the list. Checkin' it twice. Been laying up food and supplies
for years. Haven't seen a good comprehensive list in awhile to see
what I am forgetting.
An ardent proponent of caffeine but can't remember what you should
stock?
Post by h***@nospam.org
Suggestions to links to some good sites and
lists appreciated.
Kick back and have a cup of coffee -- I'm sure you'll remember out how
to use google.
these lists are for sharing ideas. Too bad you don't have any
But I do. One of them was to avoid caffeine. You chimed in with how
great coffee is in a survival situation, and cited some half-assed
study done by "knowledge management" experts and funded by pork-barrel
spending. Looks like they did a good job -- why don't you ask THEM
what you should have on your list?
so are you Mormon, or just an asshole?

so if you are Mormon, do you even know the reason they banned coffee?
And it wasn't because caffeine was bad for your health

Hal
Frank Gilliland
2007-11-04 23:38:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@nospam.org
On Sun, 04 Nov 2007 09:45:20 -0800, Frank Gilliland
Post by Frank Gilliland
Post by h***@nospam.org
On Sun, 04 Nov 2007 08:18:50 -0800, Frank Gilliland
Post by Frank Gilliland
Post by h***@nospam.org
Making the list. Checkin' it twice. Been laying up food and supplies
for years. Haven't seen a good comprehensive list in awhile to see
what I am forgetting.
An ardent proponent of caffeine but can't remember what you should
stock?
Post by h***@nospam.org
Suggestions to links to some good sites and
lists appreciated.
Kick back and have a cup of coffee -- I'm sure you'll remember out how
to use google.
these lists are for sharing ideas. Too bad you don't have any
But I do. One of them was to avoid caffeine. You chimed in with how
great coffee is in a survival situation, and cited some half-assed
study done by "knowledge management" experts and funded by pork-barrel
spending. Looks like they did a good job -- why don't you ask THEM
what you should have on your list?
so are you Mormon, or just an asshole?
Just an asshole.
Post by h***@nospam.org
so if you are Mormon, do you even know the reason they banned coffee?
And it wasn't because caffeine was bad for your health
Don't care, I'm not Mormon. I'm just an asshole.
Winston_Smith
2007-11-04 23:57:01 UTC
Permalink
Q: Why are there so few on topic survival posts?

A: Because every promising thread winds up in a flame war or pissing
contest.
Frank Gilliland
2007-11-05 00:17:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Winston_Smith
Q: Why are there so few on topic survival posts?
A: Because every promising thread winds up in a flame war or pissing
contest.
It's a different kind of survival. Psych-survival. If you can't
exercise any control over yourself on a Usenet newsgroup, what chance
do you think you have in a real-life disaster?
JakeD
2007-11-05 00:34:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Winston_Smith
Q: Why are there so few on topic survival posts?
A: Because every promising thread winds up in a flame war or pissing
contest.
Thankfully, much of the pissing is done against the wind... (-;

JD
Offbreed
2007-11-06 04:31:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by JakeD
Post by Winston_Smith
Q: Why are there so few on topic survival posts?
A: Because every promising thread winds up in a flame war or pissing
contest.
Thankfully, much of the pissing is done against the wind... (-;
Upwind gets your legs wet. Down wind gets your face wet.

Always piss cross wind.
U***@THE-DOMAIN-IN.SIG
2007-11-07 08:22:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Offbreed
Post by JakeD
Post by Winston_Smith
Q: Why are there so few on topic survival posts?
A: Because every promising thread winds up in a flame war or pissing
contest.
Thankfully, much of the pissing is done against the wind... (-;
Upwind gets your legs wet. Down wind gets your face wet.
Always piss cross wind.
No, not cross-wind. On the Internet, you should piss cross-post.
That way, you can drag many more people into a pointless, off
topic argument.
--
Want Privacy?
http://www.MinistryOfPrivacy.com/
Stormin Mormon
2007-11-07 15:18:51 UTC
Permalink
Ready for the joke bout alt lite bulb?
--
I'm Christopher A. Young;
and, I approved this message.
.

<***@THE-DOMAIN-IN.SIG> wrote in message news:***@nntp.aioe.org...

No, not cross-wind. On the Internet, you should piss cross-post.
That way, you can drag many more people into a pointless, off
topic argument.
--
Want Privacy?
http://www.MinistryOfPrivacy.com/
strabo
2007-11-05 09:29:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Winston_Smith
Q: Why are there so few on topic survival posts?
A: Because every promising thread winds up in a flame war or pissing
contest.
Pointless bickering is like a nervous tic. It seems to be
indicative of people who are killing time and ignoring reality.


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h***@hotmail.com
2007-11-05 11:23:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@nospam.org
so if you are Mormon, do you even know the reason they banned coffee?
And it wasn't because caffeine was bad for your health
Hal-
Do you know why polygamy was banned?
Stormin Mormon
2007-11-05 13:24:02 UTC
Permalink
As a Mormon, I know both of those.
--
Christopher A. Young
.
.
Post by h***@nospam.org
so if you are Mormon, do you even know the reason they banned coffee?
And it wasn't because caffeine was bad for your health
Hal-
Do you know why polygamy was banned?
h***@nospam.org
2007-11-05 14:00:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@hotmail.com
Post by h***@nospam.org
so if you are Mormon, do you even know the reason they banned coffee?
And it wasn't because caffeine was bad for your health
Hal-
Do you know why polygamy was banned?
yes, because Utah wanted statehood and the feds would not let them in
until they banned polygamy.
strabo
2007-11-05 17:39:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@nospam.org
Post by h***@hotmail.com
Post by h***@nospam.org
so if you are Mormon, do you even know the reason they banned coffee?
And it wasn't because caffeine was bad for your health
Hal-
Do you know why polygamy was banned?
yes, because Utah wanted statehood and the feds would not let them in
until they banned polygamy.
Yes, but why the ban on polygamy?



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Dan
2007-11-05 17:20:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@hotmail.com
Post by h***@nospam.org
so if you are Mormon, do you even know the reason they banned coffee?
And it wasn't because caffeine was bad for your health
Hal-
Do you know why polygamy was banned?
Because the Jews wished to be culturally different than all surrounding
nations, and that was one difference that made them separate.

Like many of their dietary restrictions and other cultural imperatives
found in the Bible.

Dan
JakeD
2007-11-04 16:53:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@nospam.org
Making the list. Checkin' it twice. Been laying up food and supplies
for years. Haven't seen a good comprehensive list in awhile to see
what I am forgetting. Suggestions to links to some good sites and
lists appreciated.
1) Define what which of survival situation you want to preparing for.
2) Google for relevant list.

JD
Winston_Smith
2007-11-04 18:46:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@nospam.org
Making the list. Checkin' it twice. Been laying up food and supplies
for years. Haven't seen a good comprehensive list in awhile to see
what I am forgetting. Suggestions to links to some good sites and
lists appreciated.
Corrections, additions, welcomed.

Cover the basics and then add what applies to your situation.

1. Universal tangible supplies and materials
Lighting since you can't do much without it
Medical can kill in minutes
= first aid/chronic/diagnostic
= wounds/cut/abrasion/bruise/burn/break/illness
= health/fitness, strength and endurance
= Rx, vision/hearing aids
Shelter - exposure can kill in hours
= fire/fuel/shelter
= clothing is portable shelter
= rain/wind/snowload/heat
Water - Dehydration can kill in days
= finding/collection/treatment/storage
Food - Starvation can kill in weeks
= cook tools/gathering/production/preserving/storage/nutrition
= special diet needs

Sanitation
= personal hygiene
= waste management
= laundry/kitchen
Energy
= heating, lighting, cooking, purifying, computers, etc



2. Situation specific tangible supplies and materials
Travel/Transport
= motor vehicle, bicycle, maintenance parts, fluids, special tools
= on-the-road repair kit/parts
= trailer, backpack, footwear, pack animal
= weather prediction
Navigation = maps, compass, gps, binoculars, time keeping

Tools
= hand & power tools for repair/maintenance
= machine tools for fabrication
= knives, sharpening
Weapons for security and hunting
= firearms/air rifles, ammo, cleaning, reloading
= archery, slings, slingshot

Security
= prevention, detection, and reaction to intrusion
= threat/risk analysis
Communication
= intelligence gathering, planning, security



3. Intangibles
= knowledge base - practiced hands, in your head, on paper, in the
computer
= skill base to generate future income
= wealth storage - investments, property, cash, precious metal,
trade goods



4. Pull the plug and see how you make out for a week. No trips to
anywhere but work. If you have to go to the store or eat lunch out,
you have a hole in your preps.



5. Consider at least four levels of living situation. Plan as far
down as you anticipate.
= personal - illness, job loss
= temporary threat - storm, civil unrest - hunker down at home,
bug-in
= permanent threat - one time, dislocation - local power plant
meltdown, bugout to established retreat
= refuge - ongoing war or other threat requires constant movement
and stealth profile.
Stormin Mormon
2007-11-05 01:51:34 UTC
Permalink
Cover the basics and then add what applies to your situation.

1. Universal tangible supplies and materials
Lighting since you can't do much without it
CY: That's for sure. Strap on head lamps are priceless.

Medical can kill in minutes
= first aid/chronic/diagnostic
= wounds/cut/abrasion/bruise/burn/break/illness
= health/fitness, strength and endurance
= Rx, vision/hearing aids
CY: Stock what you usually use, and some first aid stuff for injuries.
Injuries more common when doing rescue work, or if power is off.

Shelter - exposure can kill in hours
= fire/fuel/shelter
= clothing is portable shelter
= rain/wind/snowload/heat

CY: STay home when possible, and in the vehicle if going out. Clothing is
good, tent, sleeping bag, foam pads are also good if caught out. Space
blankets need to be folded out to test, sometimes they shred into ribbons.


Water - Dehydration can kill in days
= finding/collection/treatment/storage

CY: Store water at home when possible. Some in vehicles.

Food - Starvation can kill in weeks
= cook tools/gathering/production/preserving/storage/nutrition
= special diet needs

CY: Food at home, in both vehicles, and in emergency bags.

Sanitation
= personal hygiene
= waste management
= laundry/kitchen

CY: TP, water, etc. The green holding tank stuff from RV Places makes an
unflushed toilet tolerable. About a tsp should do the job.

Energy
= heating, lighting, cooking, purifying, computers, etc

CY: Backup heat can be as common as kero heater, wood stove, propane tanks.
Plumbing torches, heaters, candles, Coleman lanterns, propane lanterns,
infared gadgets, they all put off heat. Generator to run the furnace is
good. Chain the genny securely, they get stolen frequently.


2. Situation specific tangible supplies and materials
Travel/Transport
= motor vehicle, bicycle, maintenance parts, fluids, special tools
= on-the-road repair kit/parts
= trailer, backpack, footwear, pack animal
= weather prediction


Navigation = maps, compass, gps, binoculars, time keeping



Tools
= hand & power tools for repair/maintenance
= machine tools for fabrication
= knives, sharpening
Weapons for security and hunting
= firearms/air rifles, ammo, cleaning, reloading
= archery, slings, slingshot



Security
= prevention, detection, and reaction to intrusion
= threat/risk analysis



Communication
= intelligence gathering, planning, security



3. Intangibles
= knowledge base - practiced hands, in your head, on paper, in the
computer
= skill base to generate future income
= wealth storage - investments, property, cash, precious metal,
trade goods



4. Pull the plug and see how you make out for a week. No trips to
anywhere but work. If you have to go to the store or eat lunch out,
you have a hole in your preps.

CY: I did a four day power cut, in 2003. The last day was miserable. I
finally wired the furnace into my generator, that was really good. Shoulda
done that the first day.

5. Consider at least four levels of living situation. Plan as far
down as you anticipate.
= personal - illness, job loss
= temporary threat - storm, civil unrest - hunker down at home,
bug-in
= permanent threat - one time, dislocation - local power plant
meltdown, bugout to established retreat
= refuge - ongoing war or other threat requires constant movement
and stealth profile.

CY: Works for me.
Mike
2007-11-05 23:35:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Winston_Smith
Cover the basics and then add what applies to your situation.
1. Universal tangible supplies and materials
Lighting since you can't do much without it
.....except in daylight which in many habitable places particularly in
the Northern Hemisphere could be 16 hours a day, add in a bit of
moonlight and you could easily cope without any lighting - millions do
exactly that in the tropics and have done for millennia. No maglites,
no candles, no electricity, nothing!

Water, shelter, food, fire and tools are the top priorities,
EVERYTHING else is just for comfort.

Water - a bottle, a filter, purifying tablets

Shelter - Bivi bag plus a tarpaulin and a bit of thin cord

Food - anything edible - even a spare tasty human - escape to the wild
with a fatty, they snuff it due to the pressure of running and you
get a BIG tasty meal.

Fire - Flint, steel and a bit of tinder in a metal box (matches are
crap, so are gas lighters, so is rubbing two bits of wood/boy scouts
together)

Tools - A knife and an axe

If you can't carry your survival kit on your person, or say in a 15
litre backpack, then it's as good as useless.

If you live in a country full of wild animals or a country full of
people with guns then you might need a weapon, those who live in the
civilised world easily cope without.


--
Stormin Mormon
2007-11-05 01:06:18 UTC
Permalink
72 hour kits
October 09, 2005

OVERVIEW
What is it? (portable kit of useful items)
Why? (gets you by for three days till emergency services arrive)
By what authority? (LDS, and FEMA)
Where? (Stored in your vehicle.)
When? (You shoula had one by now. Start today.)
How long? (Three days supplies, more is better.)
Obtained how? (Assemble it yourself.)

TYPE AND DESCRIPTION
Container? (Portable, easy to carry, fairly waterproof.)
Storage location? (In your car.)
Quanity? (Make separate kits for home, work, etc.)

CONTENTS
1) Water
2) Food
3) Medical
4) Light
5) Fire
6) Clothing and shelter
7) Other needs for the family

MAINTENANCE
Change out the perishables twice a year
Inspect for leakage, damage, etc.

FOLLOWUP:
The Sunday the 16th challenge (win a prize!)


============================
TEXT FORM:

OVERVIEW
What is it? (portable kit of useful items)
Well, the lesson for today is 72 hour kits. Most of the folks in the room
have been in the church for awhile, and you know what 72 hour kits are. Oh,
I see you smiling. [vistitor smiles] Does that mean that you've had lessons
on kits before? Yes? Well, that must mean it's a true principle. Do they
have lessons often? [visitor nods]
So, what is a 72 hour kit? Anyone? [From class: three days food and water]
yes, that's true. [some kind of emergency supplies.] Yes, that's also true.
[emergency records and papers that you might need] [I could scan the
records, and then record them to a memory stick.] Yes, that's very true.
It's clear that we are all describing parts of an elephant. Each of you are
true, and describing a different part of a kit. And that's one of my major
shortcomings. For the last year or so, I've been meaning to copy some of my
bills, and put the copies in my kit. Been meaning to do that for a year or
so.

Why? (gets you by for three days till emergency services arrive)
And why would we want an emergency kit? Well, it's pretty clear that in an
emergency the government is pretty slow to get to the scene. We've go to
take care of ourselves for awhile. It sure beats having your wife and kids
be hungry and miserable.

By what authority? (LDS, and FEMA)
And so, who is telling us to have a 72 hour kit? Well, the folks at FEMA
have been telling folks to have an emergency kit. I usually don't take
orders from them. However, the LDS church leadership has asked us to have a
72 hour kit. I wasn't able to find it on the web on the church web site, but
I'm fairly sure that the leaders have asked us to have a kit.

Where? (Stored in your vehicle.)
So, where do you store your kit? [we've got ours in a closet at the house]
[we have one of those big rubber maid totes, but with all the kids, the kit
gets pretty bit. I'm not sure we could even fit it in the car.] I suggest
that the kit needs to be in the car all the time. Cause a third or a half of
the day, you'll be away from your closet. How about right now? How many of
you are within easy range of your closet? But, all of you are within reach
of your car.

When? (You shoula had one by now. Start today.)
Ideally, you should have a kit in your car today. Well, maybe that isn't
the case, but it's always time to start. You don't have to be fancy or
perfect, but it's good to get started.

How long? (Three days supplies, more is better.)
The official guidelines is that you should have three days food and water.
More is good, but any at all is better than nothing.

Obtained how? (Assemble it yourself.)
We have some folks in the ward who have money. It's really easy to log onto
Emergency Essentials, and spend eighty bucks and buy a kit. I don't
reccomend that. Cause you aren't likely to remember the stuff that's in the
kit. I reccomend you build your own kit. Cause that way you'll know what's
in the kit. And you'll know how to use the stuff. Cause you're the guy who
put it in there.


TYPE AND DESCRIPTION
Container? (Portable, easy to carry, fairly waterproof.)
We've mentioned a few types of containers. I believe that a kit should be
easy to carry. A backpack works nicely, and [reaching under the table] here
is the 72 hour kit which I carry behind the seat of my truck.

Storage location? (In your car.)


Quanity? (Make separate kits for home, work, etc.)

CONTENTS
This last weekend at General Conference, President Hinkley mentioned home
storage. He mentioned six items to have. He mentioned water, food, clothing,
money, and medical supplies. President Hinkley is a good man, and his list
is much the same as mine. However, my list is designed to pack in the car,
not to have at home. So, some things are different.

1) Water
And, so, what to put in the kit. Well, as you can see on my list, the first
item is water. I can't remember the details, but it's something like you can
live for two days without water, or two weeks without food. So, water is the
first item [unzips side pouch of kit and pulls out a 40 ounce bottle of
water].

2) Food
Of course, food is the second item on the list. cause in the three days
you'll get hungry. [reaches into kit and pulls out several items including a
sheath knife, tin cup, Slim Jim sticks, whistle compass thing, and a few
other items] [Student: What should we put in the kit, I mean, like, it gets
to be 150 degrees in the car in the summer] Well, you have to be a bit
creative. It's personal choice. The food should be something you and your
family enjoys eating. Brother Pierce has several small boys, and might pack
jars of Gerber baby food and some plastic spoons. Brother Goodwill has two
in diapers, and he would pack some diapers and wipes in his kit. Personally,
I'm fond of granola bars, and, oh, here it is. The can of lightly salted
peanuts. [Student: Be careful with all that food on Fast sunday]. The goal
is to have enough food for three or more days. One of my favorites is
Slimfast, or the generic diet things. Cause they are just milk products, and
some water. Slimfast or Boost or Equate isn't a healthy diet, but they sure
are great in a crisis when you need some quick food that doesn't take any
cooking. And goes down good. [Student: Is that really three days food] Well,
actually, that's one of my shortcomings. I'm sure I'd be gulping down cough
drops [holds up a bag of lemon cough drops] on the second day. I really
ought to have more food, you're quite right.

3) Medical
Now, you can see the next item on the list the next item is medical. Again,
like food, the medical list is totally personal. We can all drink water, but
the meds need to be what you can use. For example, this fellow over here
might have a bad heart. And so, he'd pack his heart medicines. And this
fellow might be a needles dependent diabetic. He'd pack syringes and
insulin. And the other fellow might have a bad back, and so he'd pack his
favorite aches and pain pills. In my case, I [digs in 72 hour kit] am fond
of the old y ellow Nuprins which are no longer availabe. So, I have a bottle
of them in my kit. I also would carry [digs in kit] well, they are in here
some where, I sure hope [digs some more, pulls out a Ziploc bag with a pair
of underwear crammed in, class giggles] Well, seeing as how we're all men
here...... [digs in kit some more, pulls out a Ziploc with a white
substance, students giggle again as they realize it's a half roll of toilet
paper] Ah, the half roll of toilet paper. Well, we know what's important.
Brother Kxxxxx would know what this item is, as a church custodian he's seen
enough half rolls of toilet paper. [digs in kit some more] Oh, here they
are! Hearing aid batteries! Anyone else pack hearing aid batteries in his
kit? No, I guess not. Like I say, medical is kinda personal to each man's
needs. And his family's needs.

4) Light
well, this time of year, it's getting dark early. And as we can guess,
emergencies seldom happen in the daytime under clear skys with lots of
light. It's usually at night when things go wrong. Folks have suggested glow
sticks or light sticks. Cyalume, or other brands. I dont' like em. they
have a shelf life, and sometimes they just don't work. And after you break
the little vial inside, there is no way to turn them off. with a [reaches in
bag] flash light [shines light on table] you can turn the light on and off.
And you can spot check it.

5) Fire
One of the other odd items on my list is fire. Well, it appeals to the
primitive man inside me to be able to kindle a camp fire. It drives off the
dark, warms me, and heats my food. And I can put my camp cup [pulls out
stainless cup] over the fire and heat up some hot cocoa [reaches into cup
and pulls out some cocoa packets and sugar packets; in a Ziplock]. And the
guys in New Orleans mighta been easier to find if they had some smoke to let
folks know where they were. I've got a few strike any where matches in this
little gadget with the whistle and compass.


6) Clothing and shelter
As President Hinkley mentioned, we've been asked to have some clothing.
You've seen the underwear. Well, in another bag on the back seat, I do have
a change of clothes. I've got also a couple of those foil blankets. Lets
see, it says it folds out to 52 by 86 inches? Well, I've never tried one.
But I've heard from folks who have, and they sure are better than nothing.
And in this other packet, a cheapie plastic poncho to help keep me dry.

7) Other needs for the family
Well, there's a lot of other stuff that we can put into a kit. Like for
example, this folding tree saw. Sure comes in handy for cutting fire wood or
building a shelter. And this towel. I keep it folded up. It goes behind the
equipment, so it doesn't dig me in the back.

MAINTENANCE
Change out the perishables twice a year
Inspect for leakage, damage, etc.
And, twice a year, we should tip everything out of our kits. I've ahd stuff
leak and run before. Sure is irritating to find out that a bottle of
something has spoiled everything in the kit.

FOLLOWUP:
The Sunday the 16th challenge (win a prize!)
OK, here's the challenge. Next week between the hours of two and three,
I'll be in the clerks office, out the hall and turn left. Next week after
church, you all will go to your cars, and get your 72 hour kit. You will
bring the kit to the clerks office. Ask for me by name. You'll have to ask
for Chris, because we have two Brother Young in the office. Anyhow, we'll be
doing financial work, so don't come too far into the office. But catch my
attention and show me your kit. I'll ask for one item at random off th e
list of six. I'll say "show me water" and you pull out a bottle of water.
And then I'll give you a prize. It will be a small thing, but something with
an actual retail value. [Brother Kxxxx: And if you have copies of your
records in your kit next Sunday, I'll give YOU a prize!] I'll take that
challenge.

Anyhow, on the way out of the room, please grab a copy of the flyer, here.
This list is a bit longer than I had time for, and so you can read it later.

Anyhow, we're out of time, and so I close the meeting [LDS folks will know
whose name I used] turn the time over to our Elders Quorem President.
--
Christopher A. Young
.
.

<***@nospam.org> wrote in message news:***@news.newsguy.com...
Making the list. Checkin' it twice. Been laying up food and supplies
for years. Haven't seen a good comprehensive list in awhile to see
what I am forgetting. Suggestions to links to some good sites and
lists appreciated.
Stormin Mormon
2007-11-05 01:07:04 UTC
Permalink
30 Tips for Emergency Preparedness

Here are 30 tips to help you and your family become
better prepared for an emergency.

OVERVIEW:
Go through your calendar now, and put a reminder on it every six months to
review your plan, update numbers, and check supplies to be sure nothing has
expired, spoiled, or changed. Also remember to practice your tornado, fire
escape or other disaster plans. Drive your planned evacuation route and plot
alternate routes on a map in case main roads are blocked or gridlocked.
Commit a weekend to update telephone numbers, emergency supplies and review
your
plan with everyone.


SUPPLIES:
You should keep enough supplies in your home for at least 14 days. Build an
emergency
three day supply kit to take with you if you leave. The
basics include: water, food, battery-powered radio and flashlight with
extra batteries, first aid supplies, change of clothing, blanket or sleeping
bag, wrench or pliers, whistle, dust mask, plastic sheeting and duct tape,
trash bags, map, a manual can opener for canned food
and special items for infants, elderly, the sick or people with
disabilities. Keep these items
in an easy to carry container such as a suitcase, bucket, backpack, or a
duffle bag.

Store at home foods that ave a long shelf-life. You and your family like.
Do not require cooking. Can be easily stored. Have a low salt content as
salty foods will make you more thirsty. Buy a few items each time you’re
shopping and/or see a sale until you have built up a well-stocked supply.

Check your family’s first aid kit, you may need it. Your family's medical
needs will dictate what supplies to stock.

Keep at least a 14 galons of water per person. Store
water in plastic containers such as soft drink bottles. A normally
active person needs to drink at least two quarts of
water each day. Hot
environments and strenuous activity can double that
amount. Children,
nursing mothers, and people who are sick will also
need more. Water by itself
will quench your thirst but it will not replace your
electrolytes lost when
you exert yourself. Include electrolyte powders to
make a drink to replenish
your body's salts.

Mess kits, or paper cups, plates, and plastic
utensils
Emergency preparedness manual and a copy of your
disaster plan,
including your emergency contacts list
Battery-operated radio and extra batteries*
Flashlight and extra batteries*
Cash or traveler's checks.
Non-electric can opener, utility knife*
Fire extinguisher:
Tent*
Duct Tape*
Compass
Matches in a waterproof container*
Aluminum foil
Plastic storage containers
Signal flare
Paper, pencil*
Needles, thread
Medicine dropper
Shut-off wrench or pliers, to turn off household
gas and water*
Whistle*
Plastic sheeting*
Map of the area (for locating shelters and
evacuation routes)*
Toilet paper, towelettes*
Soap, liquid detergent*
Feminine supplies*
Personal hygiene items*
Plastic garbage bags, ties (for personal
sanitation uses)*
Plastic bucket with tight lid
Disinfectant (Lysol Yellow)
Chlorox chlorine bleach
(Continued in the next tip)

Include at least one complete change of clothing and
footwear per person
in your emergency supply kit. We suggest long pants
and long sleeves for
additional protection after a disaster.
Clothing and Bedding (Essential Items are Marked
with an Asterisk *)
Sturdy shoes or work boots*
Rain gear*
Blankets or sleeping bags*
Hat and gloves*
Thermal underwear
Sunglasses



ROUTES:
Preparedness Tip #1
What are the best escape routes from your home? Find at least two ways out
of each room.
Now, write it down. You’ve got the beginning of a plan.


COMMMOS:

Designate two meeting places in case you can't get home. Choose one right
outside your home, in case of a sudden household emergency, such as a fire.
The second place you choose needs to be outside your neighborhood, in the
event that it is not safe to stay near or return to your home.

Choose an emergency contact person outside your area because it may be
easier to call long distance than locally after a local/regional disaster.
Call the out-of-town contact, and be sure it's OK. Be sure to distribute
the contact's phone number to everyone in the family. Business cards are
conveient to carry, and can list several phone numbers. Your contact can
share with other family members where you are; how you are doing; and how
to get in contact with you.

You should also have at least one traditionally wired landline phone, as
cordless or cellular phones may not work in an emergency.

Preparedness Tip #20
Teach children how to dial 9-1-1 in an emergency.
Review emergency action
steps with all family members:
Check the scene and the victim
Call 9-1-1 or your local emergency number posted by
the telephone
Care for the victim
Help your children learn more about emergencies.
Download this
preparedness coloring book. or visit Red Cross'
"Masters of Disaster."

Preparedness Tip #8
Teach your children how and when to call 9-1-1 or
your local Emergency
Medical Services number for help. Post these and
other emergency
telephone numbers by telephones.

prepared to listen to
instructions from your local emergency management
officials. Visit
Ready.gov and www.redcross.org/preparedness for more
information on
sheltering-in-place.


TEAM WORK:
A community working together during an emergency
makes sense.
Talk to your neighbors about how you can work
together during an
emergency. Take CERT training available from Payson
Fire Dept to learn
disaster response skills.
Find out if anyone has specialized equipment like a
power generator, or
expertise such as medical knowledge, that might
help in a crisis.
Decide who will check on elderly or disabled
neighbors.
Make back-up plans for children in case you can't
get home in an
emergency.
Sharing plans and communicating in advance is a good
strategy


AWAY FROM HOME:



EMERGENCY EVAC:
Some emergencies require you to leave home for a time. It is wise to keep
your vehicle in good repiar. Keep the gas tank near to full. Keep some
supplies in your vehicle at all times, and some other supplies which are
easy to grab and go.

Emergency Kit For Your Vehicle
Bottled water and stable foods which don't need cooking.
Flashlight and extra batteries
Blanket
Booster cables
Fire extinguisher (5 lb., A-B-C type)
First aid kit and manual
Maps
Shovel
Tire repair kit and pump
Flares or other emergency marking devices


The last place you want to be during an emergency is an a government
shelter. You may be searched, disarmed, and the supplies you bought with
your own money will be taken from you "for the good of the whole". Most
emergency shelters cannot house animals. Plan in advance how to care
for your pets and working animals when disaster strikes. Pets should not
be left behind, but could be taken to a veterinary
office, family member’s
home or animal shelter during an emergency. Also be
sure to store extra
food and water for pets.




SHELTER IN PLACE:
In some emergencies you are best to stay home. Such as snow storms. In some
emergencies, you may be required to turn off your utilities. To prepare for
this type of event: Locate the electric, gas and water shut-off valves.
Keep necessary tools near gas and water shut-off valves Teach adult family
members how to turn off utilities. If you turn off the gas, a professional
must turn it back on. Do not attempt to do this yourself.



WWORK / SCHOOL:
Check your child’s school Web site or call the school
office to request a
copy of the school’s emergency plan. Keep a copy at
home and work or other
places where you spend a lot of your time and make
sure the school’s plan
is incorporated into your family’s emergency plan.
Also, learn about the
disaster plans at your workplace or other places
where you and your family
spend time.



And, if disaster strikes while you’re at work? Many
employees still don’t know what their workplace plan
is for major or minor
disasters. Actually, many companies don't have a plan. Know multiple
ways to exit your building, participate in workplace
evacuation drills,
and consider keeping some emergency supplies at the
office. Visit
www.ready.gov and click on Ready Business for more
information about
business preparedness.



Read the information on your city, county and/or
state government Web
sites as well as the “Be Prepared” section of
www.redcross.org or
Ready.gov and print emergency preparedness
information. Be sure to keep a
copy with your disaster supplies kit. It can provide
telephone numbers,
addresses and other information you need when
electronic connections are
not available options for obtaining the information.

FOOD / WATER:

It is easiest
to use bottled water
for drinking and cooking. When
it’s not available, know how to treat contaminated water.
Water may be
contaminated by a variety of parasites that cause diseases such as
dysentery,
cholera, typhoid, and
hepatitis. All water of uncertain purity should be
treated before use. Use
one or a combination of these treatments:
Filter: Filter the water using a piece of cloth or
coffee filter to
remove solid particles.
Boil: Bring it to a rolling boil for about one
full minute. Cool it and
pour it back and forth between two clean containers
to improve its taste
before drinking it.
Chlorinate:
– Add 16 drops (1/8 teaspoon) of liquid chlorine
bleach per gallon of
water. Stir to mix. Sodium hypochlorite of the
concentration of 5.25% to
6% should be the only active ingredient in the
bleach. There should not
be any added soap or fragrances. A major bleach
manufacturer has also
added Sodium Hydroxide as an active ingredient,
which they state does
not pose a health risk for water treatment.
– Let stand 30 minutes.
– If it smells of chlorine. You can use it. If it
does not smell of
chlorine, add 16 more drops (1/8 teaspoon) of
chlorine bleach per gallon
of water, let stand 30 minutes, and smell it again.
If it smells of
chlorine, you can use it. If it does not smell of
chlorine, discard it
and find another source of water.
Flood water can also be contaminated by toxic
chemicals. Do NOT try to
treat flood water.

LIKELY RISKS:

A disaster can cause significant financial loss. Your
home
may be severely damaged or destroyed. You may be
forced to live in
temporary housing. Income may be cut off.
Important financial records could be destroyed.
To help you, consider using the Emergency Financial
First Aid Kit (EFFAK),
a tool developed by Operation Hope, FEMA and Citizen
Corps or contact your
local Red Cross chapter for Disasters and Financial
Planning: A Guide for
Preparedness.

Learn if earthquakes are a risk in your area by
contacting your local
emergency management office, or state geological
survey or department
of natural resources. Information about earthquake
risk is also available
from the U.S. Geological Survey National Seismic
Hazards project.

Floods are frequent and costly natural
disasters. Most communities in the
United States can
experience some kind of flooding. The rule for being safe is simple: head
for
higher ground and stay
away from floodwater. Even a shallow depth of
fast-moving floodwater
produces more force than most people imagine. Local radio or
television stations
or a NOAA Weather Radio are the best sources of
information.

When there is concern about a potential exposure to a
chemical or other
airborne hazard, local officials may advise you to
"shelter-in-place" If you believe
the air may be contaminated or if you are
instructed by local
officials, to create a
temporary barrier
between you and the contaminated air outside.
To shelter-in-place and seal-the-room:
Close and lock all windows and exterior doors.
Turn off all fans, heating and air conditioning
systems.
Close the fireplace damper.
Get your disaster supplies kit and turn on your
battery-powered radio.
Go to an interior room that is above ground level
and without windows,
if possible. An
above-ground location
is preferable because some chemicals are heavier
than air.
If directed by local authorities on the radio, use
duct tape to seal all
cracks around the door and any vents into the room.
Tape plastic
sheeting, such as heavy-duty plastic garbage bags,
over any windows.
Listen to your radio or television for further
instructions. Local
officials will tell you when you can leave the room
in which you are
sheltering, or they may call for evacuation in
specific areas at
greatest risk in your community

If There is an Explosion:
Take shelter against your desk or a sturdy table.
Exit the building immediately.
Do not use elevators.
Check for fire and other hazards.
Take your emergency supply kit if time allows.

If There is a Fire:
Exit the building immediately.
If there is smoke, crawl under the smoke to the
nearest exit and use a
cloth, if possible, to cover your nose and mouth.
Use the back of your hand to feel the upper, lower,
and middle parts of
closed doors.
If the door is not hot, brace yourself against it
and open slowly.
If the door is hot, do not open it. Look for
another way out.
Do not use elevators.
If your clothes catch on fire, stop-drop-and-roll
to put out the fire.
Do not run.
If you are at home, go to your previously
designated outside meeting
place.
Account for your family members and carefully
supervise small children.
GET OUT and STAY OUT. Never go back into a burning
building.
Call 9-1-1 or your local emergency number.

Preparedness Tip #30
Unlike an explosion, a biological attack may or may
not be immediately
obvious. Most likely local health care workers will
report a pattern of
unusual illness or a wave of sick people seeking
medical attention.
Understand that some biological agents, such as
anthrax, do not cause
contagious diseases. Others, like the smallpox virus,
can result in
diseases you can catch from other people.
Public health
officials may not
immediately be able to provide information on what
you should do. It will
take time to determine exactly what the illness is,
how it should be
treated, and who may have been exposed.

During a declared biological emergency:
If a family member becomes sick, do not assume, that you should go to a
hospital emergency room
or that any illness is the result of the biological
attack. Symptoms of
many common illnesses may overlap.
Use common sense, practice good hygiene and
cleanliness to avoid
spreading germs, and seek medical advice.
Consider if you are in the group or area
authorities believe to be in
danger.
If your symptoms match those described and you are
in the group
considered at risk, immediately seek emergency
medical attention.
If you are potentially exposed:
Follow instructions of doctors and other public
health officials.
If the disease is contagious expect to receive
medical evaluation and
treatment. You may be advised to stay away from
others or even
deliberately quarantined.
For non-contagious diseases, expect to receive
medical evaluation and
treatment.
If you become aware of an unusual and suspicious
substance nearby:
Quickly get away.
Protect yourself. Cover your mouth and nose with
layers of fabric that
can filter the air but still allow breathing.
Examples include two to
three layers of cotton such as a t-shirt,
handkerchief or towel.
Otherwise, several layers of tissue or paper towels
may help.
Wash with soap and water.
Contact authorities.
Watch TV, listen to the radio, or check the
Internet for official news
and information including what the signs and
symptoms of the disease
are, if medications or vaccinations are being
distributed and where you
should seek medical attention if you become sick.
If you become sick seek emergency medical
attention.
--
Christopher A. Young
.
.

<***@nospam.org> wrote in message news:***@news.newsguy.com...
Making the list. Checkin' it twice. Been laying up food and supplies
for years. Haven't seen a good comprehensive list in awhile to see
what I am forgetting. Suggestions to links to some good sites and
lists appreciated.
Stormin Mormon
2007-11-05 01:10:16 UTC
Permalink
Bug Out Bucket - alt.survival



Some what along the lines of caching. A friend of mine has
allowed me to leave a bucket of "whatever" with him. In case
things get bad here, and I have to bug out to his place. From
what I can figure, the purposes of a bug out bucket would be to

1) Allow me to move in, and take some of the strain off my host.
It is very kind of him to offer to take me in. Sure beats
living out of the car, or being a homeless person. And it would
be nice to have some of my own gear, instead of using his stuff
all the time. What kind of gear would be good to include?
Remember, it's got to be inexpensive, and it's got to fit in a
bucket.

2) Figure for some of my personal needs, things that my host not
ordinarily stock.
I don't have extra eye glasses or hearing aids to put in such
a bucket. Wishing I did. But, some of
the lactaid, and other medications would make things easier. Much
of what I need
is at the local stores. But who can tell? They may get cleaned
out and panic bought.

3) Preserve some of my personal memories and heritage, so that
I'm not a totally
displaced person.
I'm thinking this is going to be the major focuss. I'm going
to see what I
can find in the way of old letters from people, photos, and that
kind of thing.
My host is likely to have food and water, but the old photos are
something that
can't really be recovered.

4) Provide some kind of starter scratch kit so I can restart my
life. Tools, and equipment that I could use to start a business.

5) End of the world stuff. If it's really bad, then our personal
needs will change greatly. Suddenly, nicad or nickel metal
batteries will be good, as they are solar charged. As opposed to
single use alkalines.

Please give me some ideas what to put in a bug out bucket?

--

Christopher A. Young
You can't shout down a troll.
You have to starve them.
.




It does occur to me that my bucket of stuff might be lost,
stolen, etc. So, I wouldn't want to put a lot of valuable items
in. For example, cash or coins. Wouldn't want to stash a firearm,
as another example. I'm also wondering how personal I want to
get. Some have suggested copies of records, documents, photo ID,
etc.
I don't have extra eye glasses or hearing aids to put in such
a bucket. Wishing I did.
Those cheepy glasses from Wal-Mart might be good enough for reading
glasses, they good enough for me, all I need. Should however, take
some
time trying them in the store, not easy to immediately tell what's
good.
Some brands are definatley better than others.
But, some of the lactaid, and other medications would make
things easier. Much of what I need is at the local stores.
But who can tell? They may get cleaned
out and panic bought.
Or so you won't waste time running after an essential when you don't

have time.
Please give me some ideas what to put in a bug out bucket?
Just one bucket? That's hardly worth the trouble unless you expect
to be
on foot.

Perferably.....

- Things you won't mind your friend looking through. I sure wouldn't

want to store something for someone I didn't know what was in it.

- Things that are bulky, but not expensive. Small, high value items
you'd want to keep with you.



:
: - Zero maintence items.
CY: For sure. No perishables.

:
:
: If it were me, i'd just put a bunch of dried beans, rice, stuff
like
: that.
CY: Food is provided at the destination.


I would put photocopies of my ID and important papers,
a condensed
will,
photocopies of my family members and some friends, (CY: how do you photocopy
your friend?)
a deck of
cards,
some paracord, a roll of heavy duty tinfoil,a pencil, A
medium
good swiss army knife, a medium quality multitool(nothing too
exspensive, but usable, a small sharpening stone, a sewing kit, a
spool of spiderwire fishingline and a bunch of hooks, sinkers and a
couple cheap bobbers, A pair of work gloves, a pair of winter
gloves,
a year-round hat, a set of grooming stuff,( combs, brush, soap,roll

of TP...),a mess kit with a few days hard rations or food
bars(complete with spoon, fork, knife and a pan and lid with handle
that also has some bulloin cubes, salt, pepper and some herbs in
it.),
a couple bottles of 99% alcohol(rubbing alcohol, not the drinking
stuff), a first aid kit, a bee's wax hurricane candle, magnesium bar

with a flint on the side for starting fires,a whistle and compass, a

space blanket,a poncho that will last more than just a couple times
but not the top of the line type, duct tape, needlenose plyers and a

larger linesman type that has wire cutters and a hammer head on
it(multitool of another sort), an exacto knife and many extra
blades(emergency scalpel), over-the-counter pain killers and cold
relief ( halls, plus neo-citron or the like) some nails, some large
garbage bags,a small LED light, a couple of good cable saws, a bunch

of straightpins and a small box of safety pins, packets of tea and
instant coffee with sugar and cremer, a jar of petroleum jelly and a

bag of cotton balls or a roll of cotton, elastic bands, an extra
pair
or two of work socks and underwear, a cotton t-shirt and shorts,one
magnifying glass, a book that has a lot of knowledge packed in a
small
space, with first aid as part of it. If you have room a sweat shirt
and sweat pants and an extra pair of shoes, a blanket and a pillow,
a
larger knife, a innertube patch kit and glue, a cheap but ok pair of

binoculars or a monocular, a tarp and a sportsman vest. You could
pack
some of this stuff inside a fanny pack and some of the small stuff
inside a plastic water bottle, so you would have some way of
carrying
water. You may want to toss in a few matches and maybe a cheap bic
lighter. A couple of drill bits could come in handy but not totally
needed.

With this you would be able to live outdoors in comfort for a few
days and you would have the tools to make stuff and repair stuff to
earn your keep. If you where living with this other person for a
while, your stores could really come in handy. The deck of cards
would
pass time in a fun manner if that is what you wanted. I think if you

packed it tightly, you could get most of those items in your pail.
Any
questions?

Michael J. Kaer in Canada
author of "What Money Can't Buy"



From: ***@nowheres.com (the_blogologist)
Date: Tue, 13 Mar 2007 01:57:07 -0800

Here it is folks:

Survival kit contents check:

http://tinyurl.com/2tcjk6



From: "Stormin Mormon" <cayoung61-&***@hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 13 Mar 2007 09:17:06 -0500

Excellent list of ideas. I'm going to have to reformat this a
bit, turn it into a list. And then consider each of the items.
Thanks.

--

Christopher A. Young
You can't shout down a troll.
You have to starve them.
.





From: "Brewer720" <***@yahoo.com>
Date: 13 Mar 2007 09:53:09 -0700


I'm mostly read-only in here but if I had the ability to store a bug

out bucket at a pre-arranged destination the contents of that would
be
determined by what is in my bug out bag. I'll assume that you have a

bug out bag at your residence that would get you through a few days,

so stocking the bucket with longer term items would probably be
where
I would start.

As someone else mentioned in here, ammunition would have to be at
the
permission of the home owner. We all know how lame the "that's not
mine" excuse sounds so why put your friend in an uncomfortable
situation unless he's willing to put up with it. Toilet paper is
always useful, as are candles. Warm clothing that would be too big
to
put in your bug out bag might be something to consider if cold
climate
is a possibility where you are. It does take up a lot of space
though.

Photocopies of ID and important papers are also a good idea and
wouldn't take up a lot of room.

I don't know what is in a normal sewing kit, but I would add a few
spools of nylon thread because it's strong enough to use for ANY
repair, and could also be used for other things. Fishing line and
hooks are another thing that I wouldn't want to be without.

If you're talking really long term some seeds might be a good idea.
Make sure that they aren't hybrid seeds. In case you didn't know,
hybrid seeds will grow vegetables that either don't have seeds, or
the
seeds that are in the vegetables will be useless. You probably
already
know that though, but someone out there may not.

That's what I would do though, I'd take stock of my bug out bag and
try to plan beyond that for my bug out bucket.






From: "Stormin Mormon" <cayoung61-&***@hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2007 09:40:40 -0400

Got a few thoughts, from a friend of mine who is knowledgable in
these things.
I would put photocopies of my ID and important papers,
Good
condensed will,
A condensed will is useless in reality, as it is not a legal
document. I also
don't mean legal as in lawyer, although that helps. Just that no
one saw you
sign this particular will. Which is what a condensed copy is.
Might even have
your signature, but it is a copy and not allowed. they are only
good if you have
what you want done to your body after death.
I would get both a Living Will and have a trusted friend or
relative in a
Durable Power of Attorney. Could be for just medical reasons or
you can have
another one that also can attend to your affairs after you are
incapacitated or
die. At least, till the Executor steps in, which might even be
the same person.
This is like mine now. *** is on my will as heir, with my cousin
to inherit if
*** passes away before I do or within 30 minutes after I do. he
and my cousin
are also in the same order, for my Durable Power of Attorney and
my Medical
Durable Power of Attorney. I also have the Living Will here in
*** and one
still in affect in both *** and ***. I carry the Living Will in
my
truck and *** supposedly has a copy in his car.
The will itself as the Powers of Attorney are in the filing
cabinet here, as
well as the other copies of my Living Will
CY: That's a major shortcoming on my part. I don't have any of
the legal documents. Will, power of attorney, that kind of thing.
photocopies of my family members and some friends,
Well, photocopies or duplicate pictures.which are easily bought
now, when
getting developed pics.
deck of cards,
very good, if you play cards
some paracord,
Maybe, if you have something to support or climb, like a tarp
into a rain shelter.
roll of heavy duty tinfoil,
yes
CY: I wasn't really sure wh at tinfoil could do.
pencil,
yes, but cover the stock eraser with a store bought one. As the
eraser that is
exposed to air, will get hard. The one under it, will still be
good.
CY: Got a couple ball pens in my bucket already.
medium good swiss army knife,
why only a medium good one? Why not the best one they make?
medium quality multitool(nothing too exspensive, but usable,
Same as above. as the cheap ones tend to break with hard usage.
CY: One of my concerns is I don't want to go farther into debt,
to stock a bucket full of tools that I'm going to not use for
many years.
small sharpening stone,
yes
CY: Something to buy...
sewing kit,
yes and make it a homemade kit
spool of spiderwire fishingline and a bunch of hooks, sinkers
never heard of spiderwire fishing line. That paracord above, can
also be used
for fishing line. separate the strands and there you go.
couple cheap bobbers,
Why stock these? As a branch or other floatable object, would
work good enough.
CY: I'm not a fish eater, so this is a bit useless.
pair of work gloves, a pair of winter gloves,
Both, of course!
CY: Hmm. Gloves, have to get a pair for the bucket.
year-round hat,
Might be better to have a balaclava for the cold temps and a
booney hat for
other times.
set of grooming stuff,( combs, brush, soap,roll of TP...),
comb or hair brush for sure, the toothbrush can be made in the
wild and they are
better than the store bought ones. Cheaper too! While we have all
kinds of TP
here. I would go with two rolls for your bucket. The soap can be
those little
motel type bars or any other unscented type soap. Our soap in the
house is not
unscented though. We do have a shoe box full of motel soap,
shampoo and stuff
like that.
CY: Yep, I've also got some motel soap bars. Probably throw a
couple of those in. I figured you ahd TP. Looks like the bucket
won't be totally full when I'm finsiehd, so I may pack some TP.
mess kit
one where the pots, skillet and lids all nestle inside one
another. Can also add
salt, pepper and your favorite spices, boullion and carry them in
that kit.
Also, could have some waterproof matches in that kit.
CY: Might go buy one of those, to pack.
few days hard rations or food bars
this is good, but you have to make certain they are good for a
year at a time.
Preferably longer. Kinda like mainstay, Datrex or the SOS type
bars. Remember,
it does get hot out there, just not as hot as a motor vehicle
would get in the
summer.
CY: Which is why I hadn't planned to put any food in this bucket.
Just osme tic tacs for convenience.
bulloin cubes, salt, pepper and some herbs in it.),
well, everything except the herbs were mentioned above.So, it
just depends on
what you like to use now. No need to experiment with spices, when
you are
already stressed out.
a couple bottles of 99% rubbing alcohol
BG) made, but only available in bulk and to industrial users. I
know, I have
checked that out. However, Walmart and Sams Club here, sell the
90% rubbing
alcohol. One bad thing, is that it can corrode any metal if it
gets lose in your
kit. Had that happen with a set of surgical instruments. I do
have several
bottles and will give you one.
CY: I jsut forwarded this list. I don't think the 99% alc is all
that useful.
first aid kit,
make your own though
CY: I'm sure a couple medical t hings will find its way into my
kit.
bee's wax hurricane candle,
Well, I like the plumbers candles better. They don't get used up
as fast as beeswax.
magnesium bar with a flint on the side for starting fires,
yes! Think I gave you one of these, the last time you were down
here.
CY: Possible, but I don't remember that. I'm aparently one of few
people who RTFM. I'm remembering reading about an episode of
Survivor where no one could get a fire going with a magnesium
bar. None of them had done it.
whistle and compass,
Well, if you found the bucket here. You would not need the
whistle for sure. A
compass is not needed either, except on completely overcast days.
Even then, if
you can see where the light is strongest. You can usually tell
directions. As to
telling direction from seeing tree moss on the North side of
the tree. Hope
you aren't depending on that little bit of fantasy. Cause moss
can grow on all
sides of a tree!
However, if you have a map. A compass can make it easier to
determine direction
and follow a straight path.
CY: That's a thought -- map. Whistle is good only if others are
out there, and the others are helpful. If the others are looters,
then you'd best nto be making noise.
space blanket,
basically useless, unless taken out occasionally, unfolded and
then refolded in
different ways. Plus, I would have more than one, for safeties
sake.
CY: I hear that.
poncho that will last more than just a couple times but not the
top of the line type,
Why not get a true, GI poncho. They are fairly cheap and made for
long term use.
CY: Good idea.
duct tape,
either this or 200 MPH tape. Could also be wrapped around
something else, to
reduce bulk
needlenose plyers and
Not useless, but takes up room and weight, if you have that multi
tool and good
swiss knife.
linesman type that has wire cutters and a hammer head on it
Just get a good belt knife, sheath and stone instead.
exacto knife and many extra blades(emergency scalpel),
useless and extraneous. As either of your knives can do for a
scalpel. Could
have some razor blades,but even they aren't necessary. As you can
shave with a
good and sharp knife.
CY: And they usually come in a bulky plastic box.
over-the-counter pain killers
Use the trammodal/ultram instead, if you have them and they don't
make you like
a dummy. Ibuprofen 800's maybe for more intense muscle pains,
sprains and the like.
CY: Yes, I'm planning on put some ibu in my bucket.
cold relief ( halls, plus neo-citron or the like)
very few people that spend a lot of time in the outdoors, get
colds of any kind.
Plus, none of these or anything in actuality, will cure a cold.
Not even all
those supposed cold medicines. They just make it feel better. Get
at least 8
hours of sleep, get a balanced diet/multi-vitamin and you should
be okay.
CY: I'd planned to put some cough and cold meds in. I'm
rememberig the last time I was visiting, and that miserable sinus
infect. I had to go buy some meds.
some nails
useless1 If you have to hang clothing. Just throw it over a
branch or sting some
para cord which is above.
some large garbage bags,
Definitely1 Main use is as an emergency rain cover or other
shelter from rain,
snow or sleet.
CY: Good thought.
small LED light,
with one battery reversed and extra batteries there. The problem
here is that
sometimes a battery will leak. Thus ruining everything it comes
in contact with
except for glass.
CY: True, though I've only had batts leak when they got left
turned on, or if they were recharged.
couple of good cable saws,
well, the survival type, with rings at either end.
straightpins and a small box of safety pins,
This should be in your sewing kit above somewhere. why have
additonal ones
somewhere in a bucket?
packets of tea
I would go with the MRE juice packets or like them. as I
absolutely hate hot
tea, but can drink iced tea that has warmed up. Just not hot.
instant coffee with sugar and cremer,
not for me and I suspect not for you. The sugar would also make
me extremely
gassy and maybe give me the runs. Definitely not what you want in
survival mode
unless you knew you had eaten some bad food. Then, get rid of it
ASAP!
CY: Yep, I was not planning on packing coffee.
jar of petroleum jelly
unless you can keep it in an upright position. I would forget
this
CY: I had af riend whos vaeline jar leaked into his first aid
kit. Yikk!
bag of cotton balls or a roll of cotton,
maybe. You could have some cotton balls mixed in with petroleum
jelly and in a
waterproof container. This for very easy fire starting.Although,
I like candles
better. Especially the ones that do not melt, except when they
are lit.
elastic bands,
useless. in a hot environment. They will become brittle. That
duct tape would be
better.



From: "Stormin Mormon" <cayoung61-&***@hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2007 13:41:06 -0400


I'd not thought of the seeds. I know enough folks mention them on
various lists. Clothes, candles, all that is good. Ammo should be
already available at the place. Along with food and water.

Thanks for some really good ideas.

--

Christopher A. Young
You can't shout down a troll.
You have to starve them.
.
--
Christopher A. Young
.
.

<***@nospam.org> wrote in message news:***@news.newsguy.com...
Making the list. Checkin' it twice. Been laying up food and supplies
for years. Haven't seen a good comprehensive list in awhile to see
what I am forgetting. Suggestions to links to some good sites and
lists appreciated.
Stormin Mormon
2007-11-05 01:10:46 UTC
Permalink
CAR SURVIVAL STUFF LIST
All 6 messages in topic - view as tree
From:Stormin Mormon - view profile
Date:Wed, Sep 15 2004 10:33 pm
Email: "Stormin Mormon" <cayoung61-#***@hotmail.com>

I been putting together an in-car list of survival supplies.
My "threat scenario" is overnight in the car in the snow/ice with
my wife and child.

I assume that I will not be "that" far from rescue, that is to
say I expect to be rescued the next day. I hope to fit it all in
an ammo can.

Here's the list in no particular order.
------------------------------------------------------
2 candles and holders (light and minor heat source)
matches
water (or juice boxes)
cloth gloves (for working in cold weather)
alcohol (for minor injuries)
band-aids
"ace" bandage

Ice scraper (so I can see where I'm stuck :) )
rubber gloves (I might be called to assist someone else who is
injured)

pocket knife
wire or string
3 space blankets
cheap flashlight
hard candy (to quite the stomach and soothe the throat)
$1.00 in quarters (for phone calls)
flares

paper, pencil, pen (to leave messages)
toilet paper
acetaminophen or ibuprofin
duct tape (to seal any air leaks; misc. stuff)
3 rain ponchos (in case we have to walk in precipitation)

An extended list might include (out of the ammo can)
---------------------------------------------------------
Blankets, coats,boots,large "overpants" (prob. cammos),gravel,
am/fm battery radio, food,gas,more water the summer list might
include bug spray, sunscreen, sunglasses.

Any comments.

(The kitchen sink WON'T fit in an ammo can, one of my goals...]

My $0.02 :

1) don't buy a "cheap" flashlight. They can't take the abuse.
Buy a better grade waterproof flashlight, moisture and dirt won't
ruin the switch. I can't prove it, but I'll swear batteries
don't store as long in a cheap flashlight.

2) carry candybars, breakfast bars, dried fruit, etc. You will
need more than hard candy for overnight in subzero conditions.

3) first aid kit for your car.
Extra oil & antifreeze
basic tools (vise-grips, screwdrivers, small socket set)

WD-40 (a frozen throttle cable is a bitch at -50 windchill)
starting fluid / A tow rope or chain / SHOVEL/ Gravel.

4) Learn to improvise. Can you make a motor oil lantern? Do you
know how to fix a radiator with bubblegum, beer cans, and baling
wire?

5) Know your limits and STAY CALM. It is amazing how little some
people think in emergencies. A few years ago a guy that worked
at the local weather station, the guy that always said to stay in
your car if stranded in a blizzard, froze to death...he tried to
walk for help after going in the ditch.

I'm done prechin' now

Reply

From:Bob Peterson - view profile
Date:Sat, Sep 18 2004 6:43 pm
Email: "Bob Peterson" <***@insightbb.com>




Cammos? If you expect to use them out in the snow get something that
will
be useful in the snow. Typical cotton trousers are an awful choice
for
snow
conditions. I would avoid carrying gas. its just not safe and its
far
better to keep your tank filled up. Sunglasses are important year
round.
I
would add some baby wipes. Thes come in handy pretty regularly. I
might
also have a better first aid kit.



Reply

From:Stormin Mormon - view profile
Date:Wed, Sep 22 2004 9:13 am
Email: "Stormin Mormon" <cayoung61-#***@hotmail.com>

You're right. I did go back to my files, and include tools, spare
wheel,
and
small engine parts into the file. Thank you.

--

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
www.mormons.com

"Strabo" <***@flashnet.com> wrote in message




Where's your tools? Got a good jack? Spare tire? Some wire
and electrical tape? Fuses?

Reply

From:***@somewhere.org - view profile
Date:Wed, Sep 22 2004 10:43 am
I been putting together an in-car list of survival supplies.
My "threat scenario" is overnight in the car in the snow/ice with
my wife and child.
Why not just a sleeping bag appropriate for the conditions in your
area
and
a CB/HAM/cellphone?

What about items more common "emergencies".

Jumper cables
Baby wipes
Paper towels
Tire patch kit
12v tire inflator
Flares/triangles
#2 Philips screwdriver
1/8" and 1/4" blade screwdrivers

What about stuff for easy to fix vehicle problems?

Basic metric or SAE socket set
Windshield washer fluid
Oil
Transmission Fluid
Coolant
Spark plugs
Distributor cap & rotor
Alternator belt

Reply

From:Myal - view profile
Date:Wed, Sep 22 2004 7:05 pm
Email: Myal <***@hotmail.com>




Tire pliers , or other bead breaker , tube patches , glue tyre
levers...
Hey , ya might be running tubes instead of tubeless , I like the rope
reapir kits for the tubless tires , not supposed to be used on the
highway , but I forgot that last time , and drove twice cross
continent
and then some on it ...
--
Christopher A. Young
.
.

<***@nospam.org> wrote in message news:***@news.newsguy.com...
Making the list. Checkin' it twice. Been laying up food and supplies
for years. Haven't seen a good comprehensive list in awhile to see
what I am forgetting. Suggestions to links to some good sites and
lists appreciated.
Stormin Mormon
2007-11-05 01:11:22 UTC
Permalink
Date: Sunday, September 04, 2005 12:15 AM

Many of the evacuees are coming to our state of Texas, and many of
us have been volunteering to help in whatever way we can. The
victims of this storm are stunned and in shock as you all know, and
everyone here is doing all we can to help.

Volunteering this weekend has made me realize the vital importance
of the 72-hour Emergency Kit that we've all been advised to keep.
Many of those coming were fortunate to simply escape with their
lives from the disaster, but even those who left early before the
storm hit land are now homeless. Those early evacuees had to leave
in such a hurry that they left important and needed medicines, left
vital documents- left checkbooks - all because they had to evacuate
in such a hurry with only 24-36 hours notice- some much less.
Those evacuees are the ones preaching the importance of a 72 hour
emergency kit. They tell me that they had to leave in such a hurry
that they couldn't think clearly. They say if they'd had a duffle
bag pre-prepared when they had to leave in such a hurry, it would
have helped tremendously. I'm going to post some suggestions I
found for a 72 hour kit but perhaps others could add. Based on what
I've seen this weekend- I can't overemphasize the need for
sufficient water, medicines, food, and a way to listen to news
broadcasts. Also, think about something for the children- something
for them to do to keep their minds involved (coloring books, reading
books, favorite stuffed animal, etc.) and something to lend security
to a difficult situation.

Volunteering this weekend has also made me realize the importance of
the daily strengthening our testimony, the importance of family and
faith, and made all of us much more thankful and appreciative of the
many blessings we have in the strength of each other. These people
are such an example to me in their strength and their determination
to move on. As we reach out, we're the ones learning and growing
from their example. Caitlin

72 Hour Kit Checklist

Your kit should be in a durable water resistant duffel bag, frame
pack or day pack located near an exit of your house. Each family
member should have their own personalized kit with food, clothing
and water and it should be inspected and updated at least twice a
year. Do not overload the kits--you may have to carry it long
distances to reach safety or shelter.

3-5 gallons of water stored for sanitation and drinking and method
of water purification (rotate)
72 Hour supply of food (rotate)
Windproof/waterproof matches and second method to start a fire
Mess kits and other cooking equipment
Tent/shelter
Wool-blend blanket or sleeping bag
Emergency reflective blanket
Lightweight stove and fuel
Hand and body warm packs (check expiration dates)
Poncho
Flashlight with batteries (check expiration dates), candles or light
stick (keep in top of kit so you can find it easily in the dark)
Tools, pocket knife, shovel, hatchet or axe
Sewing kit
50-foot nylon rope
First aid kit and supplies (see below)
Radio with batteries or radio with alternate power sources
Whistle with neck cord
Personal sanitation kit (include soap, toothbrush and gel, comb,
tissue, sanitary napkins and razor)
Extra clothing for each family member (include extra socks,
underwear, hat, sturdy shoes and gloves) -- store in plastic to
protect from water.
Money
Important documents (such as birth certificates, marriage licenses,
wills, insurance forms, phone numbers, credit card information)
Stress relievers (games, books, hard candy, inspirational reading,
small toys, paper and pen)
Sun block, insect repellent, snake bite kit, necessary medications
(including extra contacts)
Basic First Aid Kit

Include the following items in your first aid kit:

First aid manual or guide
Band-Aids (various sizes)
Gauze (various sizes)
Triangular bandages
Elastic bandages with pins
Cotton balls or cotton square pads
Disposable diapers (dressing/splint/padding)
Sanitary napkins (pressure dressing)
Non-adherent sterile pads (various sizes)
First aid tape or micropore adhesive, or paper tape
Anti-bacterial ointment (Neosporin, bacitracin, etc.)
Burn cream
Eye wash
Iodine pads or plastic bottle
Petroleum jelly
Rubbing alcohol swabs or plastic bottle
Hand soaps
Salt
Hand wipes (antiseptic)
Rubber disposable gloves
Small splints, popsicle sticks
Non-aspirins, pain relievers, ibuprofen, essential medications
Laxatives and diarrhea medicine
Chemical ice pack, hand warmer packets
Safety pins (various sizes), needles and heavy thread
Scissors, tweezers, pocket knife, razor blade, etc.
Thermometer
Matches (water proof/wind proof)
Survival Kit for Your Car

Always maintain at least œ tank of gas
Tools needed to change flat tire
Jumper cable
Road emergency flares
Fire extinguisher (Standard Class ABC)
Collapsible shovel
First Aid Kit and First Aid Guide Information (basic)
Sanitation (toilet tissues)
Freeze-dried or nonperishable canned foods and a can opener!
(option)
Writing pad and pencils, maps
Ice scraper for winter season
Baby Diaper Bag
--
Christopher A. Young
.
.

<***@nospam.org> wrote in message news:***@news.newsguy.com...
Making the list. Checkin' it twice. Been laying up food and supplies
for years. Haven't seen a good comprehensive list in awhile to see
what I am forgetting. Suggestions to links to some good sites and
lists appreciated.
unknown
2008-03-31 22:32:30 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 4 Nov 2007 20:11:22 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"
Post by Stormin Mormon
Date: Sunday, September 04, 2005 12:15 AM
Hey People ! One of the things that have been neglected is the ability
to carry water, so what's the reason for not having a hand carried
water purification system like the katadyn water filter which weights
less than 1 quart of water and can purify over 13,000 gallons of
water.
Its expensive but it's worth it I have one in my kit.

Aezael

Stormin Mormon
2007-11-05 01:12:21 UTC
Permalink
http://independencejournal.com/whatif08.htm


WHAT IF.

They tell you to evacuate??


The country just witnessed a very real disaster with Katrina. The effects of
this storm will be felt for years. The largest evacuation ever made has now
occurred with Rita, and this event has caused me to rethink. While most
people live away from Hurricane Alley, there may still be situations where
you are asked to evacuate your home. You, as the homeowner and resident,
will have to make the call about whether to actually evacuate as instructed
or not. But in the event you do evacuate, there are some things that you can
have setup beforehand to help insure your property remains safe from looters
and that you leave with adequate preparation.



The Bug Out

Survivalists call leaving the homestead "bugging out". There are a lot of
reasons to bug out. Not the least of which is total chaos, as we witnessed
after Katrina. But if you do choose to evacuate, what can you do to protect
your home when you are simply not there? What determines whether you should
actually evacuate?

First, the goal in evacuating is to increase your chances of personal
survival. Forget property - this is about you, and your family.

Whatever the reason for evacuating, at least make sure your home is as safe
as it can be, and that it is more difficult to get into than your neighbors.
Be prepared to stay away for weeks, and handle your personal needs. Have a
destination to reach, well away from your residence. Have a planned primary
and alternate route to implement for traveling there.



First Pass

How do you eliminate the possible causes of disaster within your own home?
This is not rocket science, but most people forget these things out of haste
and lack of planning.

1) Clean Out Refrigerator - your food will spoil if left in the fridge, so
break out the ice chests and pack what you can to eat on the road. If you
have steaks or other frozen meats, then cook them and take them with you.
They will ruin if you do not, so why waste your money? Once the fridge is
cleared out, tape the door(s) in place. Leave something holding the door
open a crack. This will help prevent mildew from growing inside it while you
are gone.

2) Clean Out Upright Freezers - same deal.

3) Chest-Type Freezers - You can leave your food for a week or maybe more by
packing dry ice on top of the food and then sealing the freezer with duct
tape. The dry ice will keep it frozen, and whatever pressure builds up will
release through the gasket and tape. The more you have in the freezer, the
better, as this larger mass will tend to stay frozen longer. Try and place
your meats in the bottom, as this will be the coldest area. Pack as much dry
ice as you can on top of your frozen food. If you have spare blankets, wrap
them around the freezer as additional insulation to retain the cold. Only do
this if you are reasonably certain you will be back within a few days or a
week. Otherwise just empty the freezer.

4) Pets - have a travel carrier for cats and dogs. You may really love your
pet, but they need their own space when traveling, and you will have enough
to worry about without the dog peeing all over the car. If you have fish,
you can try placing their tank outside - they may live or not, but inside
they will not stand a chance. Be sure and have pet food stashed somewhere
and don't forget it.

5) Food - if you have a couple of ice chests loaded with what you removed
from your fridge, and a few bags of staples, then you are probably good to
go for food. Don't forget a can opener. I always have 20 or so MRE's in each
vehicle just in case of emergency. It never hurts to have them, and they
last for years.

6) First Aid - have your kit ready to go in your vehicle at all times. Take
a couple grocery bags to your medicine chest. Dump into the bags all your
pills, nebulizers, etc. Bring everything. Have a bottle of water
purification pills in your aid kit as well.

7) Water - bring plenty. Also, take something to make pure water. Clorox,
survival filtration straws, etc.

8) Heat Source - take something to cook with (propane stove, kerosene, at
least waterproof matches) and on (a grilling grate, piece of steel,
something to cook ON). A few pots help quite a bit too!!

9) Clothing - take what is appropriate for your climate, but include rain
gear and some bug repellent. Always bring blankets.

10) Shelter - we keep a popup tent in each vehicle as well as first aid
kits - if you do this, you will always be able to shelter yourself. They are
small, flat, store easy and are dirt cheap.

11) Light - flashlights are preferred. You can always use your car lights,
but candles or a kerosene lamp can sure make things simpler.



This is a short summary of some simple things. How many had you thought of?



Let's get into planning a little - what is your destination?



If you haven't already talked about this with a friend far away or one of
your relatives, then you should do so. Staying in a hotel only works as long
as you have money, and your money will go fast staying in a motel. If you do
make a deal with relatives or friends, then be ready to reciprocate with
them. A dry run is a great excuse to visit! But have a destination.



If you have nobody to plan an evac swap with, then you can always make for a
state or national park out of the affected area. But ALWAYS have a distinct
destination and a rationale for why it will increase your survival chances.
If it doesn't increase your survival rate, then you have chosen a bad evac
location.



Leaving Town

Hurricane Rita caused the largest evacuation of people in recent memory,
perhaps ever. Approximately 2,000,000 people from the coast headed north to
escape the storm, choking the freeways, stripping resources from the
evacuation routes, and leaving very little in their wake.


If you live in a metropolitan area, and evacuation is recommended, you have
already waited too late.



Texas has one of the country's best and most well maintained highway
systems. Oil and gas are plentiful here. Yet in the wake of Rita, store
shelves were stripped and gasoline was insufficient to complete the
evacuation of only 30% of the metro population!!



First, let me relate a few anecdotes from the Rita evacuation. Most of these
were witnessed by me or else by people I know very well who are not prone to
exaggeration, and who did evac in the mass exodus. Most of it is considered
common knowledge around the area, but thus is not likely to make it into the
national media or consciousness.



Gasoline was becoming scarce in Houston by the end of Wednesday afternoon.
This was 3 days before projected landfall of the storm. There was no
gasoline in Galveston or anywhere between Galveston and Houston by Wednesday
night. Thursday it was obvious that at 8-12 miles per hour, many people
would run out of gas. People were pushing their cars and turning off their
A/C to conserve fuel, even though the temperature was 100 degrees. This
would mean about 110-115 degrees actually felt in congested traffic, with
all the exhaust and heat from the car engines.



Dehydration became an issue with many families. They left their cars and
walked to nearby stores, stripping the shelves of anything edible or wet.
Every convenience store was bare except for the beer section - it looked as
if locusts had been through each one. Managers had to temporarily close
several Wal-Mart's and similar stores due to the mobs vying for food and
liquids. Any road appearing to go north was flooded with evacuees, as they
tried to get off the freeway and take alternate routes. This resulted in
massive gridlock throughout the entire area.



Police, under instructions, blocked each of these alternate routes and
forced everyone to stay on the designated evacuation routes. This slowed
traffic measurably, as locals who knew how to get out without increasing
already congested interstate traffic were forced into the evacuation herd.



Some entrepreneurs began to buy up burgers by the 40's and 50's from
McDonalds and Burger King. They would carry these back to the freeway and
sell them to stranded motorists for $5 to $12 each. Drinks were selling
roadside for $5 to $15 each. Stalled cars were pushed out of the way by
following cars whether they wished it or not. All trash (tampons, dirty
diapers, etc.) was dumped roadside - it is still there as I rewrite this
article. People were urinating and defecating on the roadside - they had
nowhere else to go. Piles of human excrement are readily visible to anyone
willing to walk beside the freeways. Sunday afternoon (24+ hours after
landfall), there were anywhere from 5 to 20 cars stranded/abandoned roadside
between each exit ramp and on ramp. You will not see this in news coverage.



Our police department was tied up trying to open up all lanes for northbound
use - the "contra-flow" idea which they implemented much too late. This
allowed numerous fights to break out over food and water. Many shoplifters
simply snatched or grabbed and ran back into the snarl of creeping traffic,
as witnessed by our 4 local convenience store managers. They tried calling
our police, but there was no way for them to magically fly over all the
congestion and enforce the law. Again, this did not make the news coverage.



Once traffic began to move (with the contra-flow lanes now open), many
caravans of latinos used blocking to get ahead in the tight traffic. One car
in the caravan would hit the feeder or access road and block the left lane
of traffic by faking a stalled car. The rest of the caravan would exit the
freeway and use the blocked lane to speed ahead to another on ramp. Once
there, another car would fake a stall in the right lane of the freeway, and
then the caravan would all jump back on the freeway, and the first stalled
car would magically be repaired. This allowed many of them to leapfrog out
ahead of those without CB radios and a plan. As before, this story will not
make the news, yet I do admire them for thinking this maneuver out. However,
it slowed things dramatically for everyone else even with the contra-flow
lanes open.



The shelters designated by the authorities were woefully inadequate for the
number of people leaving. Many were going to stay with friends of relatives
in other metro areas. This also caused a run on gasoline and supplies in
each of the designated destination cities. In short, while Texas did it
better than Louisiana, it remained a fiasco in every way outside of the
actual moving of physical bodies from harms way.



Why? Because all of our supply lines are based on daily delivery - food,
drink, gasoline - everything. Our freeways are designed for local traffic
needs, not massive evacuation. If Rita had made landfall as a Cat 5 head-on
into Galveston, there would have been many people homeless and probably
significant loss of life. Remember, 4 million people did NOT evac because
there was no gas and the roads were all clogged. Sure, the mayor came out
and told everybody to sit tight, but it was the only option for him - there
was no fuel left and no way to evacuate the remaining Houston population!!
If you are in a huge metro area, then think about in Houston - 30% of the
population used all the available gasoline in a single 36 hour evac.



So, with this knowledge now a part of my experience let me revise my
recommendations.



1) If you live in a large metropolitan area, and you wait for the government
to tell you to evacuate, you have waited too late.

2) If you are in a large metro area, you should make sure you have 20 or so
gallons of gas IN ADDITION to full tanks well before any evacuation is
begun. This means having several gas cans available. Even better, have an
extra fuel tank added to your vehicle.

3) You should have 10 gallons of water on hand as a precaution for being
stuck in slow moving traffic.

4) You should have some MRE's or other handy foods to eat while sitting in
traffic, enough for 48 hours without being hungry.

5) Have some 12V fans available to conserve your fuel and prevent
overheating due to running the A/C without moving the car.

6) Bring something to block the sun from your car windows in slow traffic.

7) If it is winter, then prep for extreme cold weather rather than heat.



The next item is how to get out of town geographically. The Galveston and
Metro Houston South evac actual movement of traffic was at 8-20 MpH. Horses
trot much faster than this, and the average bicycle rider makes more
progress. So how can we speed this up and get to safety?

The ideal is to be a day or two ahead of everyone else. Failing this,
seriously consider staying home. However, you may still find yourself in a
traffic jam in spite of your best efforts.

Firstly, never forget that if traffic is stopped, then walking may be
better. If people had the time to go and buy hamburgers, how fast were
things really moving? Pack light, take water and hoof it, provided that
walking will get you where you need to be more quickly. Drag along your
cooler, or your kid's Red Ryder wagon with what supplies you can bring.



Another valid option is bicycling. You can easily average 20 MpH unless you
are dragging too much gear. So if you just bring you Bugout kit, you should
be able to make better time on a bike. You can also go right around
roadblocks setup for cars, allowing you to use alternate roads. Police may
tell you they don't advise it, but then again, are they advising you to
simply sit and await fate? Police enforce the laws as required, and in times
of crisis, where they are able. They are unlikely to inhibit your bicycle
movement other than with a warning. As long as you have your route mapped
out, you can bicycle to it if you need to. Carrying bicycles on your car
would ensure you have another option available.



My preference is to use an on/offroad motorcycle. This allows you to simply
cruise by on the shoulder when traffic is nearly stopped, and motor into and
out of a ditch when required. The only tight spot for a motorcycle would be
a bridge without shoulders or a similar tunnel - those may slow you. But
otherwise, using a motorcycle or two leaves you a much greater range of
options in escaping disaster. If need be, you can rough it down the median
or on the grassy shoulder of the road. You can take the back roads even if
congested by running on the shoulder. You will require much less gasoline,
and with a simple 2-gallon plastic can gain twice your normal range. If you
were to tow a trailer with a couple of motorbikes, you could abandon your
car roadside and take to the motorcycles if required by circumstances.
4-wheelers could also be used in lieu of motorcycles, but in both cases,
pack light.



If traffic is moving at 5-10 MpH, then the police will be stuck with that.
You can simply motor away and not worry about them until later, if then.
Crossing one simple ditch will make them unable to follow you in their
cruisers, even if they were inclined to do so. If necessary, you could even
follow power line right-of-ways to get elsewhere. Just be sure to have a map
indicating rivers and creeks - you will still need a bridge or a shallow
ford to cross them. But in our motorcycle or 4-wheeler example, you can use
railroad bridges too, giving you many additional options.



In the event of everybody trying to evac from a metro area, you would be
well advised to start on the motorcycle or 4-wheeler. The crush of people in
cars will be incredible. You might want to stay away from the freeway to
avoid people trying to take your motorcycle - craziness happens frequently
when people are in panic mode.



Another option is to use your local river or large stream to slip away.
People simply think auto-centrically. By using alternative modes and paths
of transport, you can give yourself a much safer and more viable way to get
out. In the recent Rita event, many boat captains simply motored down the
coast ahead of the storm, towards Mexico. Sure, the storm might have
followed them, but if they are far enough ahead, they can outrun it anyway
(8-14 MpH storm speed). Worst case is exactly what they faced by staying -
loss of their boat.



If you have a power boat and enough gas, you can be away and downstream
without anybody bothering you and without endangering your family in a
crowded and panicky highway exit. Maybe you need to carry your kayaks or
canoes over a couple of miles to another stream - this is difficult, but it
would be far safer than battling for water and fuel and position amongst the
crowds on the interstate. Maybe you carry a canoe or kayak on the car as a
second alternative, knowing where the interstate crosses streams or rivers.



Naturally, if it is winter, then you will need to rethink these plans.
Walking is fine unless you are in a blizzard. Bicycles may not work so well
in snow. But motorcycles or snowmobiles will work. Streams and rivers may be
frozen, but this may also furnish you yet another route by traveling the
edges of a solidly frozen lake or river. A snowmobile with a sled behind it
can travel a very long way in winter and over incredibly varied terrain. It
is a great option in the event of a real total evac.



To make your way safely, you need to get rid of your auto-centric thinking.
Railroads, streams, rivers, oceans - all are viable transportation routes.
How many people think of leaving New York by boat? Yet at one time, it was
simply the only way one could travel.



The key to a non-auto-centric evac is maps. You should have detailed maps of
the routes you might take, and test them on the weekend. Don't forget to get
railroad details too - they have bridges you can use on a motorcycle or
4-wheeler that auto-centric people will not even think about. If you plan a
possible boat evac, have coastal or river maps and try the route out on a
weekend.



Finally, provided you have the cash, don't be afraid to charter a plane if
circumstances dictate and you have enough time. Pooling with others can give
you enough cash to hire out a sizable private plane to get you, your family
and neighbors out of harms way. And it's only money..they are always
printing more.





Protecting Your Empty Home

Most people simply lock their doors and leave their homes. In cases of civil
unrest, this does nothing to keep people from breaking a door or a window
and getting access to your home and contents.


Most crimes are those of opportunity. You did not see New Orleans looters
pulling down plywood and breaking into boarded up store fronts - they chose
the stores WITHOUT boarded windows, where they could easily break the glass
and attain entry. Few looters and angry people carry crow bars or hammers
around in their pockets. Most of them have nothing, which is why they want
your property.



If your home is strongly boarded up and the other homes are not, then the
chances increase that the looters will go for the easier targets, at least
on the first pass. So, what to do?



First, make sure you have turned off the gas going to your home. There is a
valve on your gas meter that can be turned off with an adjustable wrench.
Turn the gas off at the meter - this will keep your home from catching fire
in the event of a line rupture or keep your home from filling with gas in
the event your pilot lights go out.



Second, make sure you have turned off the water AT THE METER. Again, this
requires an adjustable wrench and simply turning a valve on the STREET side
of your water meter. You should drain your pipes, especially if there is a
chance of freezing weather. Most homes have the water entering the slab next
to an exterior faucet. Sometimes there is a valve between the water main
line and the house. But the key here is to find the lowest possible faucet
and open it to let the water drain out from all the pipes in your house. You
should also drain the water heater once it has been turned off. This will
usually require you to hook a water hose to the heater and then turn a drain
valve. But drain it, as the freezing of that much water can rupture the
tank. Flush your toilets as well, after the water is off and before leaving.



Third, turn off your electricity. Every home has a main disconnect. This is
sometimes called the "Master Breaker". It is obvious in a breaker box - it
is the huge breaker at the top of the circuit breaker box. Other homes may
have a separate switched box between the electric meter and the main breaker
box. But in either case, flip these to the OFF position. If you cannot
determine how to do this, the final way to shut off your power is to remove
the meter itself. It has a tamper-proof seal on it. Once this seal is
removed, the meter can be pulled out by hand. But bear in mind that there is
220 volts at the meter - be careful not to touch the contacts, and never use
a screwdriver or other item to lever the meter out. You should be able to
pull it just grasping the glass part of the meter. Flat meters usually have
a handle to let the electricians pull them.



Time-Life books has a publication called Basic Home Electricity that
illustrates all of these methods of turning off your power. Your local
electric company can also help you with this.



Boarding Up

Boarding up a house is relatively straight forward, but to prevent easy
entry, requires some thinking. Your intent is to secure your home as much as
possible. Careful measuring and placement of your protective boarding can
make things very difficult for the would-be looters.



You should use Ÿ" plywood for boarding. This is thick enough that it
requires a sledgehammer to bust through it. Using œ" plywood is wasted
effort - a screwdriver can pierce this type sheathing. Using plywood rather
than pressed wood provides added strength. Pressed wood is basically similar
in strength, but the random nature of the wood pieces can create unseen weak
spots.



You should use square-headed drywall screws as fasteners. Nearly everybody
has a Phillips screwdriver - that could let them unscrew a corner and then
pry your boards off. Few people carry a square-head screwdriver. You should
also use drywall screws at least 2" in length. This allows them to pull up
very tightly, and insures they bite into the door or window frame.



I prefer to set screws every 6-8" along the edges. An electric screwdriver
makes removing them easy work, and a little caulk and sandpaper plugs the
holes when you take them down. And this spacing makes it a real pain in the
ass for would-be looters. Looters are usually in a big hurry, knowing they
are doing something illegal. Anything that forces them to slow down or
prefer easier pickings is helpful in keeping them out of your home.



When cutting your boards to size, look at the doorway or window trim
carefully. Cut your boards so that they line up with the edges of the window
trim exactly. If they hang over your window trim boards, it provides a
leverage point for easier prying. When boarding your doors, try to do the
same - match the frame edges exactly. If your door is recessed into an
alcove, board the entire alcove section up around the door, edge to edge.
This basically makes it impossible to pry the boards loose without extreme
effort.



If your doorways are such that you can fit your sheathing boards into a
recess that makes them flush with the door framing, then this is the best
method.



If you have a second story, and there are windows above a porch or lower
roof, then be sure and board these up as well. High windows on a vertical
wall require a ladder, not usually something happenstance criminals carry.
So it's your call whether to board up these 2nd story vertical windows.



If you have a skylight, you should board this up if possible for hurricanes,
or to keep thieves out if your roof is overly accessible.



If you have a large glass patio area, you can opt to simply board the entry
into the house and accept the broken windows. This will reduce the boarding
time considerably. Trying to board up an entire glass patio is problematic
at best, and what you really want is to prevent entry into your home and
protect the contents.



Hopefully, you already have a metal garage door. You can board these up from
the inside to avoid leaving the unsightly screw holes in your metal garage
door. If your garage door is wood, then a simple foot kicking one of the
lower door panels will allow entry. My suggestion is to use Ÿ" plywood as
replacement panels in a wooden garage door or else change to a metal door.
If you have an electric garage door opener, don't worry - you're turning the
power off, remember?



The only other item I have seen that intrigued me was boarding up with
"porcupine sheathing". This is Ÿ" plywood with drywall screws drilled into
the inside (home facing) of the boards, leaving their points facing outward
when you install your door and window sheathing. Drywall screws are very
sharp, and made of hard steel. While this does require a lot of screws (one
1-1/4" screw every 3 inches), the boards you put up are basically a really
nasty thing to even lean against, much less try and pry up. They scream "get
away" to most people, and are definitely worth considering if you have the
time or evacuate frequently due to storms. Do not use standard nails - they
bend and don't work. I tried this and all you need to do is bend the nails
over. Drywall screws are sharper, don't bend, and much more intimidating.



So, here is the quick list:



1) Have a planned evacuation place with main and secondary road access
plans.

2) Save or discard perishable food in fridges, freezers and pantries.

3) Have your "Bug Out" kit ready to go (food, water, lights, shelter)

4) Board up everything except your doors

5) Shut off all your utilities and drain your pipes

6) Board your doors.

7) Fill up your car, and your spare gas cans and water containers

8) Make sure your spare tire and vehicle fluid levels are all good

9) Make sure you didn't forget the dog/cat

10) Make sure you take enough cash with you

11) If you are leaving a car, remove the battery and place it in your
garage. Make the car harder to steal.

12) Bring bicycle/motorcycle/4-wheeler in case you need to abandon car due
to speed

13) If you are Bugging Out in the midst of a Big Panic, think about which
mode of transportation will give you the best survival chances, and act
accordingly



I realize that much of this may seem obvious to those who have done it
before, but there are many people who haven't ever had to evacuate for any
reason. And having somewhere definite to go is obviously one of the things
many people didn't think about with Katrina. There were people from New
Orleans who actually evacuated to Biloxi - not good thinking.



Think non-auto-centric for a really bad, total evacuation. Crowds and panic
are not where you want to be, so use an alternate, outside-the-box strategy.
Remember what happened in the 30% evac of Houston metro.



Think about what you would really need in the event of something like
Katrina, and then plan for it. This mental exercise is simple, effective,
and increases your survival chances dramatically if you ever have to
evacuate. And there is absolutely NO SUBSTITUTE for testing your routes and
knowing them - everybody likes a leisurely Sunday drive. Make yours a test
of your evac plans and you will feel much less vulnerable if you ever are
faced with a real Bugout.



Writer: ***@urbansurvival.com

Publisher: ***@ure.net

Editor: ***@ure.net

Privacy Policy

All contents © 2005 George A. Ure and Contributing Authors as noted
--
Christopher A. Young
.
.

<***@nospam.org> wrote in message news:***@news.newsguy.com...
Making the list. Checkin' it twice. Been laying up food and supplies
for years. Haven't seen a good comprehensive list in awhile to see
what I am forgetting. Suggestions to links to some good sites and
lists appreciated.
Stormin Mormon
2007-11-05 01:12:54 UTC
Permalink
http://www.survival.com/deployment.htm

What to Take When Deploying To the Middle East
(Or living and working in the Desert)

Doran 2003

I have received so many emails in regard to what equipment to take to
the
Middle East I cannot keep up with the replies. So I decided to put
together an
article designed to help anyone deploying, living or traveling through
desert
environments to have the right gear.

For a guy who complains about hating the desert so much, I have spent
more
than my fair share of time living and working in aired lands. Even now,
my
home is in the desert.

As I have probably stated in all of my articles in the past ‘Survival
is a
state of mind. If you give up, you will die or become seriously injured.
A
positive attitude that you will make it back no matter what is going to
be the
key to your survival. I do not mean just giving lip service to the
prospect.
You have to engrain it in your brain and really believe it. I have
known a lot
of men who talked a big line about how tough, rough and ready they were
to
handle any and every situation. Then, when called into action turned out
to be
the biggest waste of semen on the planet. (No offence Navy, I did not
say
Seamen)

I have had the pleasure of serving with some of the best. I have also
had the
displeasure of serving with some of the worst. Why do I bring this up?
Because
I do not want anyone to discourage you in your personal training or
influence
your decision to fight and survive, one bad apple can spoil a mission
and put
a team in jeopardy.

I had probably one of the smartest Gunnery Sergeants on the planet. I
remember
when we would train he would always pay close attention to everyone. We
had
guys who could run like rabbits and climb like monkeys and others who
were
slower and everything in-between. It used to amaze me how most of the
guys in
the best shape were never selected to command or to become team leaders.
I
asked the Gunny why he never selected them to lead or participate in
certain
missions?

His response was simple. I want a guy who never gives up no matter
what the
odds, some guys have a harder time than others but they never quit.
Nothing
comes easy to them, they have to practice on their own time to pass the
test,
they may crawl across the finish line but they cross it. These other
guys who
never seem to fail in training have a bad day and they fall apart. I
want the
guy who is going to accomplish his mission, or die trying. One who has a
“never say die” attitude and is willing to work on his own time to hone
his skills.

I never forgot what the Gunny said and made my choices accordingly
when
selecting personnel. Since that day I train hard and buy my own
equipment out
of pocket if I am not supplied with it. In fact I usually prefer buying
my own
critical equipment.

Why is buying your own critical gear better? Because if you buy your
own gear
you can assure a proper fit and type, with undergarments, gloves, socks
etc,
and have an opportunity to test and re-test your field gear before
betting
your life on it. In my opinion this is much better then using some
untested
piece of gear I have never even seen before let alone used. I need to
make sure
it will hold up or do what I need it to do.

I understand some situations require you wear a uniform and use issue
gear. I
have put together a list of items that you can take with you regardless
of your
position, military or civilian. I will even teach you how to
circumvent the
system when the need arises.

Although you are a member of a team, it is your responsibility to make
it back
alive and well. When it hits the fan, your skills and training will
play a
large part in who lives, who dies and who is taken out on a stretcher.
I
personally do not want to leave this world without giving it my best.
And I
always want the edge no matter what the situation.

Even though the list may seem extensive, all of these items are small,
compact, weigh practically nothing and can be packed in a small space.
Since
some of the items are consumable they will be gone before you get back.

I like to vacuum pack most of the items I take, even clothing, so it
takes up
even less space. I vacuum pack summer and winter clothing
separately. This
allows me to leave the off season sealed until I need it, clean and
ready to
go.

If space is a problem on the way back, the solution is simple here as
well. I
have never been anywhere in the world that I could not get my hands on a
vacuum
cleaner.

Part of your basic kit should always include trash bags; just take
along a
few heavy duty construction-type trash bags. Fold your items and place
several
in each bag, suck the air out with the vacuum, twist up the bag, and
secure it
with 100 mile and hour tape, place in your sea bag or back pack and go.
(This
will work on clothing; poncho liners and other bulky fabric items. And
you can
use the same process if you do not have access to a commercial vacuum
sealer
before you leave)

Let’s start with the basics, clothing. If you are in the military
BDU’s
are about the best you are going to get. The fabric blends will assist
your
body in copping with the heat, cold and the UV rays of the sun.

Whatever you do, stay away from 100 % cotton, do not even weigh down
your pack
with the stuff. Remember, cotton kills; when it gets cold it stays
cold. And
yes, it gets very cold in the desert.

Some will argue in the summer months it is okay for day time use, when
worn
baggy to allow the body to naturally cool. They are right; however; why
bring
something you can only use part of the time, when you can use BDU’s and
the
other materials year round.

Make sure your socks are a thick wool hiking type or one of the new
cool max
synthetics designed for long days on your feet. I do not feel that the
military issue type provide enough padding. I do take along a few pairs
to wear
while I am sleeping. However, if the military type is all you have
they are
much better than cotton.

If you are going to be on the move or on your feet for long periods
have your
mother or girlfriend buy you several pairs of knee high panty hose to
wear
under your socks, unless you are man enough to do it yourself. Your
feet will
thank you at the end of the day.

If you are a civilian, purchase tan or green BDU trousers and the
civilian
tuck able BDU shirt or the brands of clothing made out of the
lightweight
breathable nylon. DO NOT buy the trousers with zip off legs unless you
are
just using them for Pajamas, especially if you are walking or could be
forced
to walk long distances. Unless of course you like having your legs
rubbed raw.

Even in uniform I like to take a pair of light weight EX OFFICIO nylon
trousers. They are comfortable enough to sleep in, have standard belt
loops
and several zippered pockets. They only weigh a few ounces, take up
little or
no room in your pack and you can wear them as trousers any time you need
to. I
wear them to bed, in an emergency I can jump up slide my feet into a
pair of
desert Moc’s, throw on my shirt, vest, grab my weapon and I am out the
door
before my partner has even found his shoes. If under attack I do not
have to
stand around holding my slinky, instead of engaging the enemy.

Along with my lightweight desert boots, (Leave the heavy hiking boots
behind
unless you are assigned to a mountainous area or could be) I like to
bring a
pair of low quarter lightweight suede slip-on desert Moc’s, with good
rubber
soles, heavy duty sandals that can be secured to the feet or good
slip-on water
shoes (leave the cheep shower shoes at home) and a pair of calf high
Indian
style moccasins with no sole. These can actually be rolled up and stuck
in a
pocket; you could even make your own if you were handy with a needle.
Remember to replace your boot strings with Para-cord so you have ample
cordage
available when you need it. The inside of the Para-cord can be removed
and
used; the outside can remain in your boots keeping them secure.

I want whatever I put on my feet to be serviceable and have the
ability to
use the footwear to walk, run or do whatever needs to be done at any
given
time. Mr. Murphy is always watching, and in my case rears his ugly head
just
when it is my turn to take a shower or take my boots off my feet.

The Indian style moccasins with no sole are great they give your feet
a break
from the hard soles of your boots and provided enough protection to do
whatever needs to be done. Oh, and by the way; absolutely no steel toed
shoes
at all, unless you like your feet medium rare to well done and never
wish to
use them again.

I like the cool max type undergarments, the loose under armor heat gear
for
summer and the light weigh 5.5 oz long johns for winter. I take several
of
each. The silk long johns are great for times in-between the seasons. I
do not
like bulk, I like to move when I need to and I carry enough gear I do
not like
being weighted down with heavy clothing.

I am fond of the reversible fleece jackets and vests as outerwear, they
are
light weight, and can be turned inside out if it rains or snows to keep
them
from soaking up moisture. I can layer this way and I do not have to take
a lot
of extra stuff with me.

I take a few pairs of gloves. Protecting your hands in the desert is
as
important as putting your boots on in the morning. You always need to
remember to shake your boots out.

I like the fingerless mittens; I usually wear a lightweight pair of
neoprene
search gloves underneath so I can keep my trigger and grip fingers out
while on
duty or moving through hostile territory.

In the summer I wear thin leather fingerless gloves to protect the
back of my
hands and palms from the sun, brush, pickers and anything else that
could cause
an abrasion. Unless I am searching a person; at which time I switch to
an all
leather thin Kevlar lined glove, which allows me to not touch the
subject yet,
withdraw and use my sidearm or rifle without hesitation.

Latex gloves do not do it for me; they only provide bodily fluid
protection
and practically melt on your hands in the heat of the desert. You can
wash
your leather gloves just like your hands if you need to. Just allow
them to
dry out of direct sunlight.

I never go anywhere without a wool watch cap, summer or winter; you
never know
when the weather could change. Keeping your knob warm is key to staying
alive.
Nothing does it better than a wool watch cap, they stay warm when wet
and do
not burn, so you do not have to worry about your head catching fire and
have
your buddies tease you mercilessly for the rest of your life.

I have become partial to the wool felt cowboy type hat manufactured by
the
Outback Trading Company. These hats have a wire that runs around the
brim so
it does not fall in your face in the rain, it can be flipped up at
night to
give you better vision. In the summer, it holds on to your sweat longer
providing an excellent cooling effect. It has a leather thong to hold it
on to
your skull in windy conditions and comes in earth tones. Best of all you
can
hardly wear them out and also make a great water bucket in a pinch.

I like the fleece type Baklava in extreme cold and the Arabian Shorh
or
Smagh, for summer, if you can not find one, they can be made out of the
piece
of lightweight cloth of your choice, and some type of head band to hold
it in
place. You can always use it when you get home and play Lawrence of
Arabia
with your significant other. NO PRISONERS!!!!

Several large bandanas should be taken for head, face and neck
protection,
wiping off gear and for use as an ass rag if no TP is available. Just
do not
forget which is which.

Eye Protection is a must, your eyes can be damaged for years if not
permanently by the sun. A few pairs of good UV protective sunglasses
are a
must along with cords designed to allow the glasses to hang around your
neck
when not in use, and goggles for sand storms.

There are several personal items you do not want to be without. The
first
being a great pair of tweezers; not okay, not good, but great. Spare no
expense on getting tweezers that will allow you to pull out any small
slivers
that get in the skin. A good pair of small scissors, high quality
fingernail,
and toenail clippers. An exfoliation cloth; this cloth can be purchased
in
oriental markets and stores like Bed Bath and Beyond. It removes dead
skin from
your body and encourages your body to manufacture new skin cells.
(Nothing is
proven in this area, but I believe that using these cloths may help
reduce your
chances of getting skin cancer because it gets your cells used to
replacing
bad ones with good ones.

A small container of Cetaphil moisturizing cream, this stuff goes a
long way,
a small container will last a year. Cetaphil is scent free allergy
free and
will keep you from getting cracked lips and skin.

Dr. Bronners Hemp-Peppermint soap, you can use this stuff to shave,
brush your
teeth, bath, and shampoo. It does it all so no need to pack a ton of
other
items, Dr. Bronners soap can be purchased in any health food store and a
little
goes a long way. No, you will not fail the piss test by brushing your
teeth
with it.

Instead of regular deodorant I prefer a deodorant stone, it is scent
free,
and will not melt in the heat. I bring along waterless soap and shampoo
in case
the water supply should become scarce. Never shave or wash if you can
not
rinse off all of the soap. In the desert heat it will cause an
unbearable rash
and itch.

A small bottle of pine tar based shampoo should be part of your kit,
as it is
very soothing to irritated skin and scalp.

The desert is a nasty place full of germs and creeping crud that you
never
even heard of. So it is important that you keep as clean as possible.

The Middle East is even home to Malaria, so good bug juice is a must;
especially near the coast where more water is available to breed the
nasty
little critters. Since medical help can be a good distance away, I keep
a copy
of the book “Ditch Medicine” with me at all times.

First Aid items should include the following; daytime sinus meds,
nighttime
sinus meds, Benadryl tablets and liquid for itching and bug bites, extra
strength pain meds, and Tylenol PM or something like it. Also include
plain
aspirin, 2.5% iodine solution for cuts and abrasions which can also be
used
for water purification (5 drops per quart of water), mild laxative,
anti-diarrhea, snake bite kit, and saline solution to moisten the sinus
cavity
and to clean wounds. Add lots of dental floss, an extra tooth brush,
and mega
quantities of Q-tips for your ears and your weapon. Keep in mind, some
medications cause dehydration. Always be aware you may need to drink
more water
with certain medications. When taking prescriptions check with your
doctor.

In the desert never ever go anywhere; winter or summer, without water.
If
water is readily available, drink as much as you can stand, summer and
winter,
at least a gallon a day or more if you are working hard. Before I leave
my
residence I suck down a quart.

When you do not get enough water your system begins to shut down, you
brain
fogs over causing your performance and alertness to take a nose dive in
hostile
conditions; this will speed up the day of your death. We have a saying
in the
desert, “down in 12, dead in 24”. If you do not get enough water you
will
die. Best case you will become constipated to the point a doctor will
have to
clean you out or you will have to do it your self if one is not
available.
The “Ditch” medical book shows a guy raking his own dung out with his
finger. Not my idea of a good time and if I was a member of your team
you
would be on your own with that one. Without water you will become
seriously ill
to the point of hospitalization.

I have gone for up to 12 days without food in the desert, it is the
least of
your problems when you remember the rule of 3’s. When water is scarce,
do not
eat, you will use more water trying to digest the food then if you just
did
without. If food is available and if water is available; just not in
large
quantities, remember carbohydrates take much less water to digest than
protein.
So if you must eat go for the carbs.

Never take chances. Always have more than enough water with you
whenever
possible. I like the camel back, but in a day back I carry two to three
extra
Nalgene collapsible 48 oz canteens. These canteens are great because as
soon as
the water is used they can be rolled up secured with a rubber band and
tucked
neatly out of the way in your pack. I usually use them up first if
possible
and trust me, it does not take long.

Even though the military and civilian contractors do their best to
purify the
drinking water, you may be forced into a situation where you have to
purify it
yourself. I like iodine crystals. One small bottle will purify thousands
of
gallons of water and has no shelf life. They will last in your pack
forever
unlike the tablets which have a shelf life.



"Those who sacrifice liberty for safety deserve neither."--Benjamin
Franklin
--
Christopher A. Young
.
.

<***@nospam.org> wrote in message news:***@news.newsguy.com...
Making the list. Checkin' it twice. Been laying up food and supplies
for years. Haven't seen a good comprehensive list in awhile to see
what I am forgetting. Suggestions to links to some good sites and
lists appreciated.
h***@nospam.org
2007-11-05 14:43:56 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 4 Nov 2007 20:12:54 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"
Post by Stormin Mormon
http://www.survival.com/deployment.htm
What to Take When Deploying To the Middle East
(Or living and working in the Desert)
good lists. Thanks for sharing. Now how about one for long term self
sufficient farmstead preparations?
Colonel Mustard Green
2007-11-06 02:00:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@nospam.org
good lists. Thanks for sharing. Now how about one for long term self
sufficient farmstead preparations?
1. Get some land suitable for farming ("tillable acres"), hunting,
collecting firewood, etc.

2. If you're also building a house, chose a site that percs (mound-
type septic systems have a pump that needs electricity). To heat
the house, use any or all of wood heat, passive solar, or super-
insulation + body heat. If you have an indoor wood stove, it would
be nice if you can also cook on it. Stock up on long-shelf-life
alkaline batteries for smoke and carbon monoxide detectors.

3. Well(s) for water. Big farm animals drink a lot. Maybe a windmill
for the barn. For the well by the house, buy a handpump and learn
how to install it if the electricity fails. Submersible electric
pumps are power-hungry.

4. A big stash of grain; to eat, feed the animals, and plant. Corn is
usually hybrid (seed won't breed true); other grains are usually
open-pollinated. Put up rodent-proof bins to store the grain.

5. Decide on motive power: agriculture by hand, draft animals, or
tractors. (I would try to run the tractors on home-made fuel,
and get hand-operated implements and equipment as "plan B";
in case I can't make or buy fuel for whatever reason.)

6. Farm implements: plow, disc, cultipacker, drag, grain drill, corn
planter, corn cultivator, corn picker, combine, grain wagons, etc.
If you have horses/cows, you need a manure spreader and equipment
to make hay: haybine, rake, baler, wagons. Horse-drawn versions of
these tools if you're using draft animals. (Spend some time in
Amish country to see how they do things.) Forage chopper, self-
unloading wagons, blower, and silo(s) if you want to make silage.
Sheds and a barn to store all this stuff.

7. Fuel for tractors:
- Ethanol. Needs corn, barley, yeast, and an efficient still. (In
a crisis, I would make this stuff anyway, even if not for fuel.)
- Methanol. Needs wood and an apparatus to make it. Poisonous.
Will eat away at aluminum, galvanized steel, some plastics,
cork, natural rubber, copper and copper alloys.
- Biodiesel. Needs some kind of oilseed (sunflowers?) and an
efficient press to get the oil out. You also need lye and some
kind of alcohol to make the ester form of biodiesel.
- Maybe steam or woodgas? (both need wood)
- There are other, more speculative possibilities for fuel

8. Equipment to process grain into foodstuffs: grain grinder,
oilseed press, equipment to make syrup from sorghum, etc.
Learn to make beer and/or wine, and make vinegar (for pickling)
from these. Maybe learn to make sourdough bread.

9. Learn how to garden, how to save seeds, and how to preserve
what you grow. Learn food safety. Learn about 'organic'
fertilizer (compost, bones & guts, greenmanure) and pest
control (companion planting, crop rotation). Learn to _make_
all of the food you would normally _buy_: staple foods (like
flour), noodles, canned vegetables/fruit/meat/fish, condiments,
sausage, herbs, etc.

10. Set up a home power system. Electricity, even a little bit, would
be nice for light, refrigeration, fans, music, computer, etc.
Wind turbine and/or solar panels, maximum power point tracker
(MPPT), deep-cycle batteries, charge controller for batteries,
and 12-volt appliances.

11. Stock up on things you can't build, grow, manufacture, or other-
wise obtain locally: canning lids, salt, iodine, meat-curing
powder, drugs (OTC and otherwise), toiletries, batteries,
spices, paper, pencils, hardware, Portland cement, etc, etc.

12. Hygiene. The septic tank will occasionally need to be pumped.
Set up an outhouse if this can't be done? Will you still buy
toilet paper? Use washcloths instead if you can't? Maybe get a
big pail of dry swimming pool chlorine for use as a sanitizer.
Learn to make lye from wood ashes, and soap from fat and lye.


What'd I miss?
Retief
2007-11-05 06:29:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@nospam.org
Making the list. Checkin' it twice. Been laying up food and supplies
for years. Haven't seen a good comprehensive list in awhile to see
what I am forgetting. Suggestions to links to some good sites and
lists appreciated.
Wait, are you not Halcitron of old, grand poster of lists and links?

It's been a while since we've heard from him...

Retief
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