Discussion:
Airbus A380: "An experience you will remember every time you fly"
(too old to reply)
Steve from Colorado
2017-10-01 03:11:23 UTC
Permalink
LOL. That's right. You'll remember that engine exploding in a huge
fireball every time you fly.

http://www.aircraft.airbus.com/aircraftfamilies/passengeraircraft/a380family/

Air France passengers describe mid-air drama as engine disintegrates
over Atlantic



Our Foreign Staff

1 October 2017 • 2:36am

An Air France flight from Paris to Los Angeles was forced to make an
emergency landing in Canada on Saturday after an engine apparently
disintegrated over the Atlantic.

Passengers said they heard a thud and vibrations rattled through the
cabin as the A380 plane lost altitude.

"We heard a big popping sound and the airplane basically dropped and it
was trembling. You could definitely tell something was different and it
wasn't just turbulence," Sarah Eamigh told the New York Daily News,
adding that the plane shook for 20 minutes before stabilising.

Passenger Pamela Adams said there was a "tremendous bang".

"It was like the plane hit a Jeep at 35,000 feet," she told the
Associated Press. "We grabbed onto something and then we sat down, and
the plane righted itself fairly soon."

Passengers nervously joked to one another as they tried to make sense of
the commotion, Ms Adams said. She figured the plane had struck a bird,
but then, it became clear that the situation was more dramatic.



The pilot came on over the loudspeaker and said the plane had lost one
of its engines and would be landing in Canada, Adams said.

Passengers posted photographs to social media showing the damage.

One said: “I think the engine has seen better days.”

The images appeared to show that the inlet, or front part, of the engine
had torn off, but the main part of the engine remained intact.

Rick Engebretsen, a passenger, tweeted that there had been a "loud thud
and a lot of vibration".

Another passenger Daniel McNeely tweeted "one of our engines is
slightly blown apart," before posting a picture of the shredded engine
taken from inside the plane's cabin.

"Just glad to be on the ground," he added.

The airline said flight AF 066 from Paris landed safely at Goose Bay
Airport in Labrador.



http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/09/30/passengers-describe-seeing-fireball-engine-air-france-flight/
--
See something; leak something.

www.globalgulag.us
26pxt⚛← Mighty ╬ Wannabe →⚛jqIeS
2017-10-01 03:57:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve from Colorado
LOL. That's right. You'll remember that engine exploding in a huge
fireball every time you fly.
http://www.aircraft.airbus.com/aircraftfamilies/passengeraircraft/a380family/
Air France passengers describe mid-air drama as engine disintegrates
over Atlantic
Our Foreign Staff
1 October 2017 • 2:36am
An Air France flight from Paris to Los Angeles was forced to make an
emergency landing in Canada on Saturday after an engine apparently
disintegrated over the Atlantic.
Passengers said they heard a thud and vibrations rattled through the
cabin as the A380 plane lost altitude.
"We heard a big popping sound and the airplane basically dropped and it
was trembling. You could definitely tell something was different and it
wasn't just turbulence," Sarah Eamigh told the New York Daily News,
adding that the plane shook for 20 minutes before stabilising.
Passenger Pamela Adams said there was a "tremendous bang".
"It was like the plane hit a Jeep at 35,000 feet," she told the
Associated Press. "We grabbed onto something and then we sat down, and
the plane righted itself fairly soon."
Passengers nervously joked to one another as they tried to make sense of
the commotion, Ms Adams said. She figured the plane had struck a bird,
but then, it became clear that the situation was more dramatic.
The pilot came on over the loudspeaker and said the plane had lost one
of its engines and would be landing in Canada, Adams said.
Passengers posted photographs to social media showing the damage.
One said: “I think the engine has seen better days.”
The images appeared to show that the inlet, or front part, of the engine
had torn off, but the main part of the engine remained intact.
Rick Engebretsen, a passenger, tweeted that there had been a "loud thud
and a lot of vibration".
Another passenger Daniel McNeely tweeted "one of our engines is
slightly blown apart," before posting a picture of the shredded engine
taken from inside the plane's cabin.
"Just glad to be on the ground," he added.
The airline said flight AF 066 from Paris landed safely at Goose Bay
Airport in Labrador.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/09/30/passengers-describe-seeing-fireball-engine-air-france-flight/
This link has better coverage of the this event.

<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4936802/Air-France-jet-loses-engine-cover-SIX-MILES-high.html>

The aircraft made emergency landing in Goose Bay, which is on the East
Coast of Canada.

The engines were made by a U.S. company called "Engine Alliance".
//The jet is powered by four Engine Alliance engines, which the
manufacturers claim offer $6 million in savings a year with a lower fuel
burn, greater range and larger payloads.

According to the company, its GP72000 engine is 'engineered for greater
reliability and the lower maintenance costs that come with it'.

Of the almost 200 A380s in the skies, 125 are powered by Engine Alliance
engines.
\\


Engine Alliance
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Engine_Alliance>
//
The Engine Alliance (EA) is an American aircraft engine manufacturer
based in East Hartford, Connecticut.[1] The company is a 50/50 joint
venture between GE Aviation, a subsidiary of General Electric, and Pratt
& Whitney,[1] a subsidiary of United Technologies. Engine Alliance was
established in August 1996 to develop, manufacture, sell, and support a
family of modern technology aircraft engines for new high-capacity,
long-range aircraft.[2]

The main application for such an engine, the GP7200, was originally the
Boeing 747-500/600X projects, before these were cancelled due to lack of
demand from airlines.

Instead, the GP7000 has been re-optimized for use on the Airbus A380
superjumbo. In that market it is competing with the Rolls-Royce Trent
900, the launch engine for the aircraft. The two variants are the GP7270
and the GP7277.

In 2017 an Engine Alliance engine suffered from an uncontained failure
during a passenger flight.[3]
\\
Steve from Colorado
2017-10-02 01:55:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by 26pxt⚛← Mighty ╬ Wannabe →⚛jqIeS
LOL.  That's right.  You'll remember that engine exploding in a huge
fireball every time you fly.
http://www.aircraft.airbus.com/aircraftfamilies/passengeraircraft/a380family/
Air France passengers describe mid-air drama as engine disintegrates
over Atlantic
    Our Foreign Staff
1 October 2017 • 2:36am
An Air France flight from Paris to Los Angeles was forced to make an
emergency landing in Canada on Saturday after an engine apparently
disintegrated over the Atlantic.
Passengers said they heard a thud and vibrations rattled through the
cabin as the A380 plane lost altitude.
"We heard a big popping sound and the airplane basically dropped and it
was trembling. You could definitely tell something was different and it
wasn't just turbulence," Sarah Eamigh told the New York Daily News,
adding that the plane shook for 20 minutes before stabilising.
Passenger Pamela Adams said there was a "tremendous bang".
"It was like the plane hit a Jeep at 35,000 feet," she told the
Associated Press. "We grabbed onto something and then we sat down, and
the plane righted itself fairly soon."
Passengers nervously joked to one another as they tried to make sense of
the commotion, Ms Adams said. She figured the plane had struck a bird,
but then, it became clear that the situation was more dramatic.
The pilot came on over the loudspeaker and said the plane had lost one
of its engines and would be landing in Canada, Adams said.
Passengers posted photographs to social media showing the damage.
One said: “I think the engine has seen better days.”
The images appeared to show that the inlet, or front part, of the engine
had torn off, but the main part of the engine remained intact.
Rick Engebretsen, a passenger, tweeted that there had been a "loud thud
and a lot of vibration".
Another passenger Daniel McNeely tweeted  "one of our engines is
slightly blown apart," before posting a picture of the shredded engine
taken from inside the plane's cabin.
"Just glad to be on the ground," he added.
The airline said flight AF 066 from Paris landed safely at Goose Bay
Airport in Labrador.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/09/30/passengers-describe-seeing-fireball-engine-air-france-flight/
This link has better coverage of the this event.
<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4936802/Air-France-jet-loses-engine-cover-SIX-MILES-high.html>
The aircraft made emergency landing in Goose Bay, which is on the East
Coast of Canada.
The engines were made by a U.S. company called "Engine Alliance".
//The jet is powered by four Engine Alliance engines, which the
manufacturers claim offer $6 million in savings a year with a lower fuel
burn, greater range and larger payloads.
According to the company, its GP72000 engine is 'engineered for greater
reliability and the lower maintenance costs that come with it'.
Of the almost 200 A380s in the skies, 125 are powered by Engine Alliance
engines.
\\
Engine Alliance
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Engine_Alliance>
//
The Engine Alliance (EA) is an American aircraft engine manufacturer
based in East Hartford, Connecticut.[1] The company is a 50/50 joint
venture between GE Aviation, a subsidiary of General Electric, and Pratt
& Whitney,[1] a subsidiary of United Technologies. Engine Alliance was
established in August 1996 to develop, manufacture, sell, and support a
family of modern technology aircraft engines for new high-capacity,
long-range aircraft.[2]
The main application for such an engine, the GP7200, was originally the
Boeing 747-500/600X projects, before these were cancelled due to lack of
demand from airlines.
Instead, the GP7000 has been re-optimized for use on the Airbus A380
superjumbo. In that market it is competing with the Rolls-Royce Trent
900, the launch engine for the aircraft. The two variants are the GP7270
and the GP7277.
In 2017 an Engine Alliance engine suffered from an uncontained failure
during a passenger flight.[3]
\\
The first engine explosion on the A380 involved a Rolls Royce engine
manufactured in China. A turbine blew apart and cut the wires on one
entire wing. Since it is a fly by wire aircraft, the pilots had to
guide the plane solely from one wing, IIRC, and managed to land it
safely in Singapore.

I was on one in the cattle section in the lower cabin flying from
Singapore to Bangkok. I had a window seat, but due to the curvature of
the wall with the window, I sat 2 feet away from the window. The
aircraft was so heavy that I wondered if the engines were powerful
enough to get us off the ground. It seemed like a long time gaining
speed on the ground before we became airborne.

The laminated sheet in the seatback of the seat in front of me which
showed what to do if we survived a water landing showed dozens of
inflatable chutes coming out of the double decker plane in lots of
different places. The chutes became life rafts, with passengers packed
like sardines -- or like those refugees in the Mediterranean floating
from Libya to Europa.
--
See something; leak something.

www.globalgulag.us
rbowman
2017-10-02 02:36:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve from Colorado
I was on one in the cattle section in the lower cabin flying from
Singapore to Bangkok. I had a window seat, but due to the curvature of
the wall with the window, I sat 2 feet away from the window. The
aircraft was so heavy that I wondered if the engines were powerful
enough to get us off the ground. It seemed like a long time gaining
speed on the ground before we became airborne.
Years ago I flew in a Mohawk (dead since '72) prop plane on the NYS
milkrun, Albany, Syracuse, Rochester, Buffalo, and Toronto. It was like
taking a bus. I was seated over the wing and on the takeoff from
Syracuse I noticed the big fan type thing wasn't going around like it
generally did. The pilot announced we'd be doing a U-turn posthaste. I
will say that he greased it down on the runway with one engine better
than he'd been doing with two. It got his undivided attention.

Most times it was a fun run since they never made any altitude and it
was scenic. One Saturday morning coming back from Toronto it was mostly
stews repositioning and a couple of paying customers. Beautiful day so
the pilot got clearance and took a low level lap around Niagara Falls
for the hell of it.
Winston Smith
2017-10-02 03:06:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by rbowman
Years ago I flew in a Mohawk (dead since '72) prop plane on the NYS
milkrun, Albany, Syracuse, Rochester, Buffalo, and Toronto. It was like
taking a bus. I was seated over the wing and on the takeoff from
Syracuse I noticed the big fan type thing wasn't going around like it
generally did. The pilot announced we'd be doing a U-turn posthaste. I
will say that he greased it down on the runway with one engine better
than he'd been doing with two. It got his undivided attention.
In the 60s I was in a group that did a lot of traveling. An office
mate of mine, a self-acknowledged worry-wart, told me his tale. On a
long flight he noticed something, possibly oil, streaming out of an
engine. He flew plenty and that wasn't normal but he told himself not
to be a worry-wart, it was probably fine. Flight was smooth. The plane
was instrumented and certainly the engineer knew about it.

Still. Finally he couldn't contain himself. He called over a
stewardess and pointed it out. She literally ran to the cockpit. The
co-pilot comes back to his seat, looks out the window, turns white,
and runs back to the cockpit. A moment later the pilot announces they
are turning and putting in for an emergency landing.

All turned out OK, but one must wonder.
Post by rbowman
Most times it was a fun run since they never made any altitude and it
was scenic. One Saturday morning coming back from Toronto it was mostly
stews repositioning and a couple of paying customers. Beautiful day so
the pilot got clearance and took a low level lap around Niagara Falls
for the hell of it.
Yeah, I did the Newark, DC, Nashville, ???, Birmingham, etc, hops more
times that I like to think about. Braniff mostly. Great airline. Full
meal on each leg and fairly tasty. Burp. I pitied the stews. It was a
mad dash to dish out the food, collect the trays, and dive into their
seats in time for the landing. More than once no time for the belt
they just braced their feet against the bulkhead between their seats
and the kitchen. Five, six times on one flight. Not a real glamorous
job.

Little 737 mostly. Build for small airports. Took off like a rocket
and landed like a rock. I really liked that little plane. Beat
anything at an amusement park.
rbowman
2017-10-02 05:40:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Winston Smith
Yeah, I did the Newark, DC, Nashville, ???, Birmingham, etc, hops more
times that I like to think about. Braniff mostly. Great airline. Full
meal on each leg and fairly tasty. Burp. I pitied the stews. It was a
mad dash to dish out the food, collect the trays, and dive into their
seats in time for the landing. More than once no time for the belt
they just braced their feet against the bulkhead between their seats
and the kitchen. Five, six times on one flight. Not a real glamorous
job.
We set up a plant in Morris, MN and I usually flew out Sunday nights.
The hop from O'Hare to Minneapolis was a Northwest 747 that usually was
more stews deadheading back for the morning flights. Unlike most
airlines with their little nip bottles, Northwest had fifths in the
galley. They had sleeves over the labels but it wasn't well booze and
they weren't stingy. Wonder I didn't drive into Lake Minnewaska on my
way out to Morris.

Some of the short hops were ridiculous, like handing out drinks and
peanuts on the Boston to NYC commuter hop.
ozmVO⚛← Mighty ╬ Wannabe →⚛Z5cvk
2017-10-02 11:10:00 UTC
Permalink
On 09/30/2017 09:57 PM, 26pxt⚛← Mighty ╬ Wannabe →⚛jqIeS
Post by 26pxt⚛← Mighty ╬ Wannabe →⚛jqIeS
Post by Steve from Colorado
LOL. That's right. You'll remember that engine exploding in a huge
fireball every time you fly.
http://www.aircraft.airbus.com/aircraftfamilies/passengeraircraft/a380family/
Air France passengers describe mid-air drama as engine disintegrates
over Atlantic
Our Foreign Staff
1 October 2017 • 2:36am
An Air France flight from Paris to Los Angeles was forced to make an
emergency landing in Canada on Saturday after an engine apparently
disintegrated over the Atlantic.
Passengers said they heard a thud and vibrations rattled through the
cabin as the A380 plane lost altitude.
"We heard a big popping sound and the airplane basically dropped and it
was trembling. You could definitely tell something was different and it
wasn't just turbulence," Sarah Eamigh told the New York Daily News,
adding that the plane shook for 20 minutes before stabilising.
Passenger Pamela Adams said there was a "tremendous bang".
"It was like the plane hit a Jeep at 35,000 feet," she told the
Associated Press. "We grabbed onto something and then we sat down, and
the plane righted itself fairly soon."
Passengers nervously joked to one another as they tried to make sense of
the commotion, Ms Adams said. She figured the plane had struck a bird,
but then, it became clear that the situation was more dramatic.
The pilot came on over the loudspeaker and said the plane had lost one
of its engines and would be landing in Canada, Adams said.
Passengers posted photographs to social media showing the damage.
One said: “I think the engine has seen better days.”
The images appeared to show that the inlet, or front part, of the engine
had torn off, but the main part of the engine remained intact.
Rick Engebretsen, a passenger, tweeted that there had been a "loud thud
and a lot of vibration".
Another passenger Daniel McNeely tweeted "one of our engines is
slightly blown apart," before posting a picture of the shredded engine
taken from inside the plane's cabin.
"Just glad to be on the ground," he added.
The airline said flight AF 066 from Paris landed safely at Goose Bay
Airport in Labrador.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/09/30/passengers-describe-seeing-fireball-engine-air-france-flight/
This link has better coverage of the this event.
<http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4936802/Air-France-jet-loses-engine-cover-SIX-MILES-high.html>
The aircraft made emergency landing in Goose Bay, which is on the East
Coast of Canada.
The engines were made by a U.S. company called "Engine Alliance".
//The jet is powered by four Engine Alliance engines, which the
manufacturers claim offer $6 million in savings a year with a lower
fuel burn, greater range and larger payloads.
According to the company, its GP72000 engine is 'engineered for
greater reliability and the lower maintenance costs that come with it'.
Of the almost 200 A380s in the skies, 125 are powered by Engine
Alliance engines.
\\
Engine Alliance
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Engine_Alliance>
//
The Engine Alliance (EA) is an American aircraft engine manufacturer
based in East Hartford, Connecticut.[1] The company is a 50/50 joint
venture between GE Aviation, a subsidiary of General Electric, and
Pratt & Whitney,[1] a subsidiary of United Technologies. Engine
Alliance was established in August 1996 to develop, manufacture, sell,
and support a family of modern technology aircraft engines for new
high-capacity, long-range aircraft.[2]
The main application for such an engine, the GP7200, was originally
the Boeing 747-500/600X projects, before these were cancelled due to
lack of demand from airlines.
Instead, the GP7000 has been re-optimized for use on the Airbus A380
superjumbo. In that market it is competing with the Rolls-Royce Trent
900, the launch engine for the aircraft. The two variants are the
GP7270 and the GP7277.
In 2017 an Engine Alliance engine suffered from an uncontained failure
during a passenger flight.[3]
\\
The first engine explosion on the A380 involved a Rolls Royce engine
manufactured in China. A turbine blew apart and cut the wires on one
entire wing. Since it is a fly by wire aircraft, the pilots had to
guide the plane solely from one wing, IIRC, and managed to land it
safely in Singapore.
That might be a Rolls Royce engine made in Singapore.

I don't think they made Rolls Royce engine in China yet.

<https://www.rolls-royce.com/country-sites/singapore/news-and-articles/rolls-royce-delivers-first-trent-aero-engine.aspx>
I was on one in the cattle section in the lower cabin flying from
Singapore to Bangkok. I had a window seat, but due to the curvature of
the wall with the window, I sat 2 feet away from the window. The
aircraft was so heavy that I wondered if the engines were powerful
enough to get us off the ground. It seemed like a long time gaining
speed on the ground before we became airborne.
It takes a lot of engine power to take-off. It is a general practice for
the pilot to calculate the minimum engine thrust required for take-off
using data from aircraft load, outside air pressure, temperature and
dew-point, and then use just enough power to take-off so as to reduce
fuel burn and engine maintenance cost.
The laminated sheet in the seatback of the seat in front of me which
showed what to do if we survived a water landing showed dozens of
inflatable chutes coming out of the double decker plane in lots of
different places. The chutes became life rafts, with passengers packed
like sardines -- or like those refugees in the Mediterranean floating
from Libya to Europa.
Here is "the most successful ditching in aviation history".

"US Airways Flight 1549 was an Airbus A320-214 which, three minutes
after takeoff from New York City's LaGuardia Airport on January 15,
2009, struck a flock of Canada geese just northeast of the George
Washington Bridge and consequently lost all engine power. Unable to
reach any airport, pilots Chesley Sullenberger and Jeffrey Skiles glided
the plane to a ditching in the Hudson River off Midtown Manhattan. All
155 people aboard were rescued by nearby boats and there were few
serious injuries."
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/US_Airways_Flight_1549>
Winston Smith
2017-10-01 08:49:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve from Colorado
http://www.aircraft.airbus.com/aircraftfamilies/passengeraircraft/a380family/
"It was like the plane hit a Jeep at 35,000 feet," she told the
Associated Press.
She figured the plane had struck a bird,
but then, it became clear that the situation was more dramatic.
I love numb brain personal assessments and how diligently the press
reports them.

Flying Jeeps and birds at 35,000 feet ????
Are Jeeps worse to hit than any other similar size vehicle ????
Post by Steve from Colorado
The pilot came on over the loudspeaker and said the plane had lost one
of its engines and would be landing in Canada, Adams said.
Air France ?? Maybe he same mechanic as worked on the Concord that
took out the better part of a city.
bookburn
2017-10-01 10:38:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Winston Smith
Post by Steve from Colorado
http://www.aircraft.airbus.com/aircraftfamilies/passengeraircraft/a380family/
"It was like the plane hit a Jeep at 35,000 feet," she told the
Associated Press.
She figured the plane had struck a bird,
but then, it became clear that the situation was more dramatic.
I love numb brain personal assessments and how diligently the press
reports them.
Flying Jeeps and birds at 35,000 feet ????
Are Jeeps worse to hit than any other similar size vehicle ????
Post by Steve from Colorado
The pilot came on over the loudspeaker and said the plane had lost one
of its engines and would be landing in Canada, Adams said.
Air France ?? Maybe he same mechanic as worked on the Concord that
took out the better part of a city.
I like the 4-engine jets, because they have that back-up in case of an engine failure. Lose two engines, and maybe they can still get down okay. Always liked the 747 for that reason.
Winston Smith
2017-10-01 18:18:28 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 1 Oct 2017 03:38:35 -0700 (PDT), bookburn
Post by bookburn
I like the 4-engine jets, because they have that back-up in case of an engine failure. Lose two engines, and maybe they can still get down okay. Always liked the 747 for that reason.
If memory serves, there was one that made it back from a pacific
flight to LA on one engine. Fly low and you get a reflection called
ground effect. Works over water. If the version I read is true, it was
the only aircraft to have permission to fly UNDER one of the bridges.
CanopyCo
2017-10-01 16:05:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Winston Smith
Post by Steve from Colorado
http://www.aircraft.airbus.com/aircraftfamilies/passengeraircraft/a380family/
"It was like the plane hit a Jeep at 35,000 feet," she told the
Associated Press.
She figured the plane had struck a bird,
but then, it became clear that the situation was more dramatic.
I love numb brain personal assessments and how diligently the press
reports them.
Flying Jeeps and birds at 35,000 feet ????
Are Jeeps worse to hit than any other similar size vehicle ????
Post by Steve from Colorado
The pilot came on over the loudspeaker and said the plane had lost one
of its engines and would be landing in Canada, Adams said.
Air France ?? Maybe he same mechanic as worked on the Concord that
took out the better part of a city.
I’d think a jeep would worse to hit then allot of crumple mobiles now days.
I’d hit a pinto that was out of gas before I’d hit a jeep.

;-)
Steve from Colorado
2017-10-02 01:57:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Winston Smith
Post by Steve from Colorado
http://www.aircraft.airbus.com/aircraftfamilies/passengeraircraft/a380family/
"It was like the plane hit a Jeep at 35,000 feet," she told the
Associated Press.
She figured the plane had struck a bird,
but then, it became clear that the situation was more dramatic.
I love numb brain personal assessments and how diligently the press
reports them.
Flying Jeeps and birds at 35,000 feet ????
Are Jeeps worse to hit than any other similar size vehicle ????
Post by Steve from Colorado
The pilot came on over the loudspeaker and said the plane had lost one
of its engines and would be landing in Canada, Adams said.
Air France ?? Maybe he same mechanic as worked on the Concord that
took out the better part of a city.
Check out this video of a Russian airliner with one engine shooting out
flames:

https://www.rt.com/news/405298-airplane-engine-fire-landing/
--
See something; leak something.

www.globalgulag.us
bookburn
2017-10-02 19:18:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve from Colorado
Post by Winston Smith
Post by Steve from Colorado
http://www.aircraft.airbus.com/aircraftfamilies/passengeraircraft/a380family/
"It was like the plane hit a Jeep at 35,000 feet," she told the
Associated Press.
She figured the plane had struck a bird,
but then, it became clear that the situation was more dramatic.
I love numb brain personal assessments and how diligently the press
reports them.
Flying Jeeps and birds at 35,000 feet ????
Are Jeeps worse to hit than any other similar size vehicle ????
Post by Steve from Colorado
The pilot came on over the loudspeaker and said the plane had lost one
of its engines and would be landing in Canada, Adams said.
Air France ?? Maybe he same mechanic as worked on the Concord that
took out the better part of a city.
Check out this video of a Russian airliner with one engine shooting out
https://www.rt.com/news/405298-airplane-engine-fire-landing/
--
See something; leak something.
www.globalgulag.us
I once had a seat at a window behind the wing of a two-engine prop driven plane, fell asleep, woke up, and notice flames coming out of the engine next to me. After critically examining how abnormal that was, I spoke to a stewardess about it, and somehow my anxiety affected her perception enough to call the co-pilot to come see. He looked and okayed it. My learning experience was that ALL the engines belch fire somewhat.
sOhi7⚛← Mighty ╬ Wannabe →⚛H8gIS
2017-10-02 19:42:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by bookburn
Post by Steve from Colorado
Post by Winston Smith
Post by Steve from Colorado
http://www.aircraft.airbus.com/aircraftfamilies/passengeraircraft/a380family/
"It was like the plane hit a Jeep at 35,000 feet," she told the
Associated Press.
She figured the plane had struck a bird,
but then, it became clear that the situation was more dramatic.
I love numb brain personal assessments and how diligently the press
reports them.
Flying Jeeps and birds at 35,000 feet ????
Are Jeeps worse to hit than any other similar size vehicle ????
Post by Steve from Colorado
The pilot came on over the loudspeaker and said the plane had lost one
of its engines and would be landing in Canada, Adams said.
Air France ?? Maybe he same mechanic as worked on the Concord that
took out the better part of a city.
Check out this video of a Russian airliner with one engine shooting out
https://www.rt.com/news/405298-airplane-engine-fire-landing/
--
See something; leak something.
www.globalgulag.us
I once had a seat at a window behind the wing of a two-engine prop driven plane, fell asleep, woke up, and notice flames coming out of the engine next to me. After critically examining how abnormal that was, I spoke to a stewardess about it, and somehow my anxiety affected her perception enough to call the co-pilot to come see. He looked and okayed it. My learning experience was that ALL the engines belch fire somewhat.
Aircraft engine fire actually happens quite often. The fire will burn
itself out after the fuel is cut off. The wind will prevent the fire
from spreading to the wing. Fire trucks will be waiting on the ground
when the plane lands. That's why the co-pilot wasn't alarmed by the
sight of the engine fire. Most of the time aircraft engine fires don't
make the news if there are no other hiccups.

The story would be different if it was a single-engine plane. You should
quit being an atheist and start praying to some almighty God to save
your arse.

CanopyCo
2017-10-01 15:58:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve from Colorado
LOL. That's right. You'll remember that engine exploding in a huge
fireball every time you fly.
http://www.aircraft.airbus.com/aircraftfamilies/passengeraircraft/a380family/
Air France passengers describe mid-air drama as engine disintegrates
over Atlantic
Our Foreign Staff
1 October 2017 • 2:36am
An Air France flight from Paris to Los Angeles was forced to make an
emergency landing in Canada on Saturday after an engine apparently
disintegrated over the Atlantic.
Passengers said they heard a thud and vibrations rattled through the
cabin as the A380 plane lost altitude.
"We heard a big popping sound and the airplane basically dropped and it
was trembling. You could definitely tell something was different and it
wasn't just turbulence," Sarah Eamigh told the New York Daily News,
adding that the plane shook for 20 minutes before stabilising.
Passenger Pamela Adams said there was a "tremendous bang".
"It was like the plane hit a Jeep at 35,000 feet," she told the
Associated Press. "We grabbed onto something and then we sat down, and
the plane righted itself fairly soon."
Passengers nervously joked to one another as they tried to make sense of
the commotion, Ms Adams said. She figured the plane had struck a bird,
but then, it became clear that the situation was more dramatic.
The pilot came on over the loudspeaker and said the plane had lost one
of its engines and would be landing in Canada, Adams said.
Passengers posted photographs to social media showing the damage.
One said: “I think the engine has seen better days.”
The images appeared to show that the inlet, or front part, of the engine
had torn off, but the main part of the engine remained intact.
Rick Engebretsen, a passenger, tweeted that there had been a "loud thud
and a lot of vibration".
Another passenger Daniel McNeely tweeted "one of our engines is
slightly blown apart," before posting a picture of the shredded engine
taken from inside the plane's cabin.
"Just glad to be on the ground," he added.
The airline said flight AF 066 from Paris landed safely at Goose Bay
Airport in Labrador.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/09/30/passengers-describe-seeing-fireball-engine-air-france-flight/
--
See something; leak something.
www.globalgulag.us
Talk about the king of understatement!
The motor was slightly blown apart.
Kind of like saying that someone had a little digestive problem when they got gut shot with a claymore.

;-)

BTW
This is why I don’t even think about flying.
Steve from Colorado
2017-10-02 02:02:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by CanopyCo
Post by Steve from Colorado
LOL. That's right. You'll remember that engine exploding in a huge
fireball every time you fly.
http://www.aircraft.airbus.com/aircraftfamilies/passengeraircraft/a380family/
Air France passengers describe mid-air drama as engine disintegrates
over Atlantic
Our Foreign Staff
1 October 2017 • 2:36am
An Air France flight from Paris to Los Angeles was forced to make an
emergency landing in Canada on Saturday after an engine apparently
disintegrated over the Atlantic.
Passengers said they heard a thud and vibrations rattled through the
cabin as the A380 plane lost altitude.
"We heard a big popping sound and the airplane basically dropped and it
was trembling. You could definitely tell something was different and it
wasn't just turbulence," Sarah Eamigh told the New York Daily News,
adding that the plane shook for 20 minutes before stabilising.
Passenger Pamela Adams said there was a "tremendous bang".
"It was like the plane hit a Jeep at 35,000 feet," she told the
Associated Press. "We grabbed onto something and then we sat down, and
the plane righted itself fairly soon."
Passengers nervously joked to one another as they tried to make sense of
the commotion, Ms Adams said. She figured the plane had struck a bird,
but then, it became clear that the situation was more dramatic.
The pilot came on over the loudspeaker and said the plane had lost one
of its engines and would be landing in Canada, Adams said.
Passengers posted photographs to social media showing the damage.
One said: “I think the engine has seen better days.”
The images appeared to show that the inlet, or front part, of the engine
had torn off, but the main part of the engine remained intact.
Rick Engebretsen, a passenger, tweeted that there had been a "loud thud
and a lot of vibration".
Another passenger Daniel McNeely tweeted "one of our engines is
slightly blown apart," before posting a picture of the shredded engine
taken from inside the plane's cabin.
"Just glad to be on the ground," he added.
The airline said flight AF 066 from Paris landed safely at Goose Bay
Airport in Labrador.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/09/30/passengers-describe-seeing-fireball-engine-air-france-flight/
--
See something; leak something.
www.globalgulag.us
Talk about the king of understatement!
The motor was slightly blown apart.
Kind of like saying that someone had a little digestive problem when they got gut shot with a claymore.
;-)
BTW
This is why I don’t even think about flying.
You've got to hand it to the captain for bringing it in safely to an
airport in Labrador. I read that the passengers and crew were left on
the plane for 21 hours before Air France transferred them to a couple of
Boeing planes, which flew them to Atlanta and transferred them to
another two craft to LAX. I'll bet that will be the last time a lot of
those passengers fly for a long time, if ever again.
--
See something; leak something.

www.globalgulag.us
r81A4⚛← Mighty ╬ Wannabe →⚛rcKEP
2017-10-02 11:37:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve from Colorado
Post by CanopyCo
Post by Steve from Colorado
LOL. That's right. You'll remember that engine exploding in a huge
fireball every time you fly.
http://www.aircraft.airbus.com/aircraftfamilies/passengeraircraft/a380family/
Air France passengers describe mid-air drama as engine disintegrates
over Atlantic
Our Foreign Staff
1 October 2017 • 2:36am
An Air France flight from Paris to Los Angeles was forced to make an
emergency landing in Canada on Saturday after an engine apparently
disintegrated over the Atlantic.
Passengers said they heard a thud and vibrations rattled through the
cabin as the A380 plane lost altitude.
"We heard a big popping sound and the airplane basically dropped and it
was trembling. You could definitely tell something was different and it
wasn't just turbulence," Sarah Eamigh told the New York Daily News,
adding that the plane shook for 20 minutes before stabilising.
Passenger Pamela Adams said there was a "tremendous bang".
"It was like the plane hit a Jeep at 35,000 feet," she told the
Associated Press. "We grabbed onto something and then we sat down, and
the plane righted itself fairly soon."
Passengers nervously joked to one another as they tried to make sense of
the commotion, Ms Adams said. She figured the plane had struck a bird,
but then, it became clear that the situation was more dramatic.
The pilot came on over the loudspeaker and said the plane had lost one
of its engines and would be landing in Canada, Adams said.
Passengers posted photographs to social media showing the damage.
One said: “I think the engine has seen better days.”
The images appeared to show that the inlet, or front part, of the engine
had torn off, but the main part of the engine remained intact.
Rick Engebretsen, a passenger, tweeted that there had been a "loud thud
and a lot of vibration".
Another passenger Daniel McNeely tweeted "one of our engines is
slightly blown apart," before posting a picture of the shredded engine
taken from inside the plane's cabin.
"Just glad to be on the ground," he added.
The airline said flight AF 066 from Paris landed safely at Goose Bay
Airport in Labrador.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/09/30/passengers-describe-seeing-fireball-engine-air-france-flight/
--
See something; leak something.
www.globalgulag.us
Talk about the king of understatement!
The motor was slightly blown apart.
Kind of like saying that someone had a little digestive problem when
they got gut shot with a claymore.
;-)
BTW
This is why I don’t even think about flying.
You've got to hand it to the captain for bringing it in safely to an
airport in Labrador.
The A380 lost only 1 engine out of 4. It can't be that difficult to fly
with 3 engines.
Post by Steve from Colorado
I read that the passengers and crew were left on
the plane for 21 hours before Air France transferred them to a couple of
Boeing planes, which flew them to Atlanta and transferred them to
another two craft to LAX. I'll bet that will be the last time a lot of
those passengers fly for a long time, if ever again.
Goose Bay is mainly a military airbase. There are very few scheduled
civilian flights going in and out of Goose Bay. It takes time to juggle
all these extra passengers coming out of nowhere.

<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CFB_Goose_Bay#Airlines_and_destinations>
An increasing number of airlines (especially smaller range aircraft like
the Boeing 757) have resorted to using Goose Bay for emergency fueling
stops, especially common for trans-Atlantic flights impacted by a
seasonally strong jet stream over the North Atlantic. The majority of
civilian airliners using the airfield are not regularly scheduled
airlines to this location. On 30 September 2017, Air France Flight 66
made an emergency landing at this airport en-route from Paris to Los
Angeles after its outward starboard engine suffered serious damage
whilst flying over the Atlantic Ocean.
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