Discussion:
What comm gear do you own and use on a regular basis.
(too old to reply)
s***@live.com
2008-01-19 15:36:22 UTC
Permalink
Over the years there have been many threads and flame wars over
"communicaiton".
Many people have the vague idea that they can purchase a "ham radio
and talk to the world".
The main problem I see with that idea is that the skill set needed to
effectively use a
radio and this is especially true for HF (2MHz~30MHz). I doubt if one
in a hundred EEs
could take a HF transceiver new from the box, take coax and wire and
build and effective
antenna and actually use it.

Years ago when was much wiser and only lurked in the group someone had
the sig ;
"Dig the well before you are thirsty".

A USA ham license is less then $10. There is no longer any CW/Morse
code requirement.
While you can just memorize the test pool, you can also learn enough
about electricity to
understand how many devices work. I am not claiming that even getting
the highest class
ham license will give you the skill set to rewire your home, but it
sure won't hurt you.

Getting a ham license could give you the skill set to understand how
to match a generator
to the expected load(s). Even if you have to hire an electrician to do
your electrical work,
his words will stop being some sort of magic incantation and convey
meaning to you.

So now for the nitty gritty, what type comm gear do you have and why.
I will start the list.
Kenwood R20000 SW receiver
AOR 7030+
Drake R8B
Kenwood TS-930S (with mods)
Icom IC-28A for home
Icom IC-28A for wife's car
Icom IC-u2AT wife's carry HT
Icom IC-28A for my car
Icom IC-2AT in my desk at work
Icom IC-2AT at my parents
HTX-202 in my car
Pay as you go Cell/PCS phones in each car.
Plain old telephone at home
PC with multimode digital capacity at home.
Multiple FRS units
Multiple 27MHz SSB mobiles
Modified commercial 70cM to ham operation HTs
Modified commercial 70cM to ham operation mobile as a base station.
Military Field Telephones
Home made 5W multiband QRP (low power) transmitters [CW only]


The Kenwood TS-930S with accessories are packed in a multi-layered EMP
and physical transport case. In a worst case situation it would serve
as a
good SW receiver and would allow reliable worldwide comms conditions
permitting.
While I hold an extra class ham license I seldom transmit. Except for
local Sky
Warn nets during nasty storms and some recent experiments with NVIS, I
simply
don't have much desire to talk to the world.

In an 'end of the world' situation I doubt if I would be doing any HF
or CB transmitting.
Mostly low power 2M or FRS, and damn little of that. But I suspect I
won't live long
enough to see the 'end of the world", or even the 'fall of western
civilization', I do
expect to see storms that take down the local power and comm grid, I
wouldn't
be all that surprised if the New Madrid Fault lets go and that would
be very interesting.
Many of us laugh at Gunner and company who choose to live in
earthquake prone
californica, but they at least know how to plan and cope with them.
Here in the central
US, many are in for a rude shock when the New Madrid cuts loose.

Most of my comm needs involve getting help if my car breaks down or
daily comms
with my wife and a few friends.

The military surplus field phones are for a true SHTF and we have to
relocate to a more
remote preplanned 'retreat'. Sounds too corny but it covers the truth
well enough.

What are you going to do when the commercial telephone systems fails?
Think of
Katrina, even the cell/PCS system has weaknesses that will allow large
area disruptions.
A CB is only going to be of very minimal use, limited range and many
users. FRS
has even shorter range. MURS approaches 2M ham for range. And GMRS can
give
very good coverage if you have access to a repeater. 2M can have a
very wide, as in
multiple state, range with repeaters that are linked. But the wider
the coverage the
more users and less likely the system will not fold.

Terry
Bart Bailey
2008-01-19 23:22:33 UTC
Permalink
In
Message-ID:<515dbbce-87f6-4695-84f4-***@v4g2000hsf.googlegroups.com>
posted on Sat, 19 Jan 2008 07:36:22 -0800 (PST), ***@live.com wrote:
Begin
Post by s***@live.com
What are you going to do when the commercial telephone systems fails?
I suppose it depends on with whom I wish to communicate,
and for what reason.
If the commercial telephone system fails because of civil strife and/or
vandalism then the HAM rigs could fill in, however if it's some large
scale natural disaster, there's not much I can do except try to outlive
the inconvenience until I'm either rescued (dug out) or try to minimize
the pain and ease my expiration. There's often the newsgroup scenario of
urban gangs roving, looting, pillaging, for which a fortified bunker
would be a definite advantage, and the discussed contents can be
tailored to the degree of fantasy involved but what is the realistic
expectation of that versus mother nature gone bad?
s***@live.com
2008-01-20 01:17:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bart Bailey
In
Begin
Post by s***@live.com
What are you going to do when the commercial telephone systems fails?
I suppose it depends on with whom I wish to communicate,
and for what reason.
If the commercial telephone system fails because of civil strife and/or
vandalism then the HAM rigs could fill in, however if it's some large
scale natural disaster, there's not much I can do except try to outlive
the inconvenience until I'm either rescued (dug out) or try to minimize
the pain and ease my expiration. There's often the newsgroup scenario of
urban gangs roving, looting, pillaging, for which a fortified bunker
would be a definite advantage, and the discussed contents can be
tailored to the degree of fantasy involved but what is the realistic
expectation of that versus mother nature gone bad?
About once every decade we get a nasty ice storm. The state of
Kentucky has
trouble getting heavy frost off the highways, so you can imagine what
1" of ice
does to transport.

During the last storm we were at the extreme southern edge of the ice.
As little
as 1/4 miles south of us there was no ice. But from us to about 40
miles north
in an near perfect west to east line there was at least 1" of ice.
Several 'friends'
ran out of vital supplies. I didn't care about those people running
out of cigarettes
or other luxuries, one friend had a new born and they ran out of
formula. The mother
couldn't nurse the infant. So he was able to reach me and I got in
touch with a friend
with a 4WD with studded tires. Standard 4WD is damn near useless. In
that case
communication likely saved the kids life. Since then my friend has
learned his leason
and is tomming along nicely as a 'preper'. He now understands that
many things could
interrupt his ability to get vital supplies.

One dark and icy night ~30 years ago I was running a high fever and
should have taken a
sick day, but at 26 I was invincible. On the way home I got to
coughing so bad I lost control
of my VW and slide off the road. It is very hard to correct with a
major coughing fit.

The temps were near zero and it was about 1:00AM. A quick call on 2M
had some friends
in route with a 4SD and chains to pull me out of the ditch.

Today cell phones can take the place of many ham style comms. But even
today the cell
system can get overloaded and fail.

About 15 years ago a nasty storm developed at about 8:00AM. I was at
work looking at the
acutrack weather radar and realized tornado was very close to my home.
I tried the phone,
but no go. I jumped in the car and headed south. I got to within 3
miles of home when the
rest of the way was blocked with downed trees. I was between antennas,
changing from one
2M antenna to another, and my wife's HT couldn't hit any of the
prearanged repeaters. But
at a distance of 3 miles I could talk with her and found out she was
fine. The tornado has
[passed maybe a 1000 feet north of her. No major damage but most of my
antennas were
ripped away. So after a quick conversation I drove to my my parents
and got my kid sister
to drive me as close as practical, which by this point was about 5
miles. Everyone and
their brother was blocking the road. The PD wasn't letting anyone walk
in, so I just took
off overland and cut through some farms. I was talking with my wife
the entire trip in.

So reliable comms are very useful in situations that are way less then
the end of the
world.

But you need to practice and understand how your comms system will
work, it;s range
limitations and the like.

While I don't suggest it, my IC28A has a magic diode that you can clip
and the radio will
transmit on police or fire VHF freqs, up to 174MHz. One Sunday
afternoon we were driving
back on one of the many gravel roads in the Red River Gorge. A kid on
a big assed motorcycle
thought he was Evil Knevil or something and wiped out about 100' in
front of us. No helmet.
His younger sister was thrown clear and was wearing a helmet. She got
up against my wife's
advice and ran to her brother who was a mess. A lot of blood from both
ears and one eye.
This kid was really hurt. Another couple was with us and tried their
cell phone and got the
no service message. So I dug out my 'spy kit', an electronics tool kit
for working on high tech
small electronics and opened the IC28A and snipped the diode. I looked
up the Us forest service
frequencies, programed in the correct split and transmitted a May Day
call. Their dispatch treated
my unexpected appearance on their net in stride and asked for the
details. I told them what happened,
the state of the bike, bent in two, and that blood was oozing from
several points in his head.
They accepted my ham call and once I gave them an exact GPS fix with
the promise to find a landing
spot,they called the med flight service and dispatched a heli. I
pulled my topo map out and found that
less then an 1/8 of a mile away was a field. It was late october so
the harvest was in. I trotted over
and checked it out to make sure there were no power lines. I
communicated this back to my wife
via HTs and she notified dispatch of the correct GPS landing spot.

About that time the county sheriff, a ranger supervisor and the rescue
squad showed up. They immobilized
the kid and carried him to the LZ. The copter landed and picked up the
kid and his sister, she had
a bad headache and looked like she had been in a cement mixer.

After the dust settled I thought well there goes a radio and maybe I
get to spend a night in jail. I had a copy
of the FCC regs with the any radio possible to save live section
highlighted but the ranger told the sheriff
he had no problem with my actions. The sheriff wasn't really made, he
just didn't understand how a ham
radio could work with other services. He did insist that I get the
radio returned to stock, so I went to a
local 2 way shop that happened to do that counties radio work. While I
replaced the surface mount
diode the owner wrote out a repair notice and a Lexington police
officer signed it. When I took the note
back the next weekend we got invited to their annual police party.
It turned out very well. The young man\
made a near complete recovery, his sister had a cracked rib or two and
was black and blue from
head to toe.

Now I do not suggest that anyone do what I did. I was very lucky.
While I would have won in court, I could
easily lost the radio and spent big bucks getting out of a jam. In
today's political climate I really don't know
if I would risk it again. Or if I did, that I would stay around for
the law.

I can think of many times 2M has helped me or someone else. I have
handled health and welfare traffic
after a major flood. One of my happiest memories is being at the
Lexington Red Cross building, food
net control, when we got a message from a new mom at a local hospital
announcing the birth of a healthy
boy. The phone system was down and this new mom had been through a
very rough pregnancy and there
was a lot of doubt it the baby would be born alive. The address said,
"The house on the hill behind the Piggly
Wiggly". Net control did no want to pass the message but I argued that
in that town and context the message
would get through. Sure enough the local ham told us a deputy had
delivered the news and the new moms
mother was ecstatic. We later got a bunch of very nice chocolate chip
cookies for our efforts. Yes we
should have refused them, but the new grandmother had tears in her
eyes at the next club meeting and
there was no way we could be that heartless.

2M is perhaps the most common and most useful radio in most urban
situations.
For longer then 20 to 20 miles one of the HF bands will probably be
better.
I say probably because I have talked simplex with my IC-2AT on high
power, 1.5W,
with a friend on a ridge who has a 10 element yagi direct. No
repeater.

I also talked to an airplane pilot who was running about 1.5W and he
was 200 miles south of me.
So under perfect conditions 2M can do wonders.

10M is very much like CB.
6M can be fun but is little used and might be good for more private
conversations, with the understanding
that 6M skip can carry over a thousand miles.

I like 160, 80, 40 and 20 with 80 and 40M being the most useful for
NVIS.

70cM is like FRS or GMRS but you can operate with more power and modes
other then FM.
A SSB 70cM or even SSB 2M, can only be intercepted by a ham with the
correct gear, the
feds, or a super savvy scanner nut.

900MHz and up might have utility for point to point, with the higher
frequencies being less likely
to be intercepted.

For the ultimate in point to point I would consider a IR LASER. Very
hard to see, very hard to tap.
It would be almost as secure as a wired telephone. IF you avoided the
common modulation schemes
a LIDAR detector would ignore it.

Back when I was a kid we used a system I read about from WWI. Each
station drives 2 ground
rods about 100' apart. You feed audio into them or take audio out. We
used some simple phono
amps that may have produced about 5W and my best friend who lived
across the street and three
doors down and I yacked for hours.

49MHz headsets are passing out of style and offer pretty good comms
out to a mile or so in the woods
or on a lake and at least several hundred feet under the toughest
conditions.

Another option might be to borrow a trick we used "way back when". In
the seventh grade my parents
bought me a Midland 13-110H 100mW 2 channel HT. All my friends had
similar units. We all had CH 7
crystals but couldn't talk very well on account of the licensed
stations. A friend's dad was a ham and
had very hard feelings for the loss of the 11M ham band when it was
given to CBers. I came up with the
bright idea of swapping the receive and transmit crystals. We would
operate 455KHz below CH7. But
the range was about 30'. My friend's dad realigned the HTs to operate
down there and we had it made.
This is pre CH9 and H,E.L.P. and at the time I didn't know that 455KC
down from CH9 was a CAP
frequency. I have never, in over 40 years of listening heard anyone
other then us way back, but we
could have been in a world of trouble. I still have the HT although it
is now realigned for proper CB
operation. Compared to any modern radio my ancient midland is a piece
of junk. But I had many
fun hours and just can't toss it out.


Terry
Gunner Asch
2008-01-20 10:56:37 UTC
Permalink
Ive been offered a Yeasu FT-101B for $125

The owner bought it, didnt know for sure if it works or not. He seemed
to remember the receive didnt work when he bought it.

Is this worth messing with? Anyone able to fix a receive problem?

Gunner



"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire.
Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us)
off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give
them self determination under "play nice" rules.

Think of it as having your older brother knock the shit out of you
for torturing the cat." Gunner
Bart Bailey
2008-01-20 13:51:27 UTC
Permalink
In Message-ID:<***@4ax.com> posted on
Sun, 20 Jan 2008 02:56:37 -0800, Gunner Asch wrote: Begin
Post by Gunner Asch
Ive been offered a Yeasu FT-101B for $125
One of the mainstay radios of the 70s (cycle 20) freeband movement.
Post by Gunner Asch
The owner bought it, didnt know for sure if it works or not. He seemed
to remember the receive didnt work when he bought it.
The real, or pretended, naivete of someone about an item for sale
is one of the most severe red flags to me, caveat emptor!
Post by Gunner Asch
Is this worth messing with?
Not to me, but I'm spoiled with the modern digital processing circuitry
in my HF radios, plus I don't have a good workbench setup anymore.
Someone with a nostalgic twinge and time to spare would be your best
bet, look for some old geezer HAM
Post by Gunner Asch
Anyone able to fix a receive problem?
Sure, even if it has to be brute force re-wired, but since that was a
favorite of CBers & freebanders, it might only be out of alignment.
--
73 de
KM6RF
Bart
h***@hotmail.com
2008-01-21 13:35:32 UTC
Permalink
Sun, 20 Jan 2008 02:56:37 -0800, Gunner Asch wrote: Begin  
Post by Gunner Asch
Ive been offered a Yeasu FT-101B for $125
One of the mainstay radios of the 70s (cycle 20) freeband movement.
Post by Gunner Asch
The owner bought it, didnt know for sure if it works or not. He seemed
to remember the receive didnt work when he bought it.
The real, or pretended, naivete of someone about an item for sale
is one of the most severe red flags to me, caveat emptor!
Post by Gunner Asch
Is this worth messing with?
Not to me, but I'm spoiled with the modern digital processing circuitry
in my HF radios, plus I don't have a good workbench setup anymore.
Someone with a nostalgic twinge and time to spare would be your best
bet, look for some old geezer HAM
Post by Gunner Asch
Anyone able to fix a receive problem?
Sure, even if it has to be brute force re-wired, but since that was a
favorite of CBers & freebanders, it might only be out of alignment.
Tweaked for maximum "splash."
Sum Ting Wong
2008-01-20 01:44:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bart Bailey
I suppose it depends on with whom I wish to communicate,
and for what reason.
With that in mind, a random length dipole fed with 450 ohm twinlead
and a balanced tuner will let you communicate on just about any HF
frequency that your transceiver covers. It goes without saying that
the radio is modified (unlocked) so it can transmit anywhere you need
to.

S.T.W.
s***@live.com
2008-01-20 03:06:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sum Ting Wong
Post by Bart Bailey
I suppose it depends on with whom I wish to communicate,
and for what reason.
With that in mind, a random length dipole fed with 450 ohm twinlead
and a balanced tuner will let you communicate on just about any HF
frequency that your transceiver covers. It goes without saying that
the radio is modified (unlocked) so it can transmit anywhere you need
to.
S.T.W.
If the SHTF and I need to talk with some friends I intend to use some
really oddball
freqs. ISM and Radio Astronomy Freqs com to mind. Multiples of 3.58
(3.579545)
could be very convenient. And if society all goes to hell, then the
WWV allocations
could be useful. Although I have a Ancient Harris "Civil Defense"
shelter HF radio.
AM/SSB receive, and Upper SSB transmit and CW only. The radio is
programed
with diodes and will cover from below the MW to 35MHz. Of the 5 that I
have seen,
all had 10.00MHz as a receive and transmit channel. I guess the feds
may plan on
at least using WWV to distribute information. I don't count this among
my normal
radio gear as it is packed away at the retreat. I designed and built a
more flexible
programing PROM to allow direct frequency entry. The receiver is not
up to my
normal expectations. Even after improving the If strip and adding
better filters, it
still isn't up to serious modern work. However in a post SHTF where
most power grids
are down and very few stations are operating, it's deficiencies
shouldn't matter as much.

It is designed to operate from 50~400Hz with 240/120 and 24/12V
capacity built in.
I actually have three of these, but like I said, they are not my first
choice for any serious
use. I have never seen these on the surplus market or at a ham fest. A
friend's dad was
tasked with cleaning out the CD shelter in the state capital and gave
them to me. He
included the letter which authorized him to dispose of everything as
he saw fit. He gave
me a notarized statement transferring ownership to me.

Terry
Sum Ting Wong
2008-01-20 06:13:17 UTC
Permalink
Although I have a Ancient Harris "Civil Defense" shelter HF radio.
AM/SSB receive, and Upper SSB transmit and CW only. The radio is
programed with diodes and will cover from below the MW to 35MHz. Of the 5 that I
have seen, all had 10.00MHz as a receive and transmit channel.
What do you plan to use for the antenna?

S.T.W.
s***@live.com
2008-01-20 07:53:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sum Ting Wong
Although I have a Ancient Harris "Civil Defense" shelter HF radio.
AM/SSB receive, and Upper SSB transmit and CW only. The radio is
programed with diodes and will cover from below the MW to 35MHz. Of the 5 that I
have seen, all had 10.00MHz as a receive and transmit channel.
What do you plan to use for the antenna?
S.T.W.
Either a vertical with a decent set of elevated radials or a 1/2 wave
dipole.

Things would have to get pretty dead, as in no signal anywhere and I
was
way to desperate to contemplate, before I would fire up on 10MHz.

For the most part I can't see the utility of transmitting on any HF
freq. It will
carry way too far and I suspect the Mutant Cannibal Zombies will have
a few
techs capable of doing RDF.

NVIS has one advantage. If you operate from a valley, it is very hard
for anyone
to do any real RDFing from ground level. The ground wave doesn't
travel very far,
and the return bounce off the ionosphere is simply too diffuse to home
in on. One
trick might be to operate on splits. You transmit on frequency 1, the
other guy listens
on frequency 1, he transmits on frequency 2 and you listen to that
frequency. Coupled
with some common sense and a prearanged code, it would be fairly hard
for others
to home in on either station and the intercept would not be all that
helpful. Traffic
analysis could reveal plans such as military campaigns. But I can see
trying to
build an empire. I will leave that to Mabu and Alan the wood's elf.

VHF and UHF have the advantage of limited range, the ease of using
highly directional
antennas and the wide choice of modulation schemes. Most scanners can
receive
AM, FM narrow, and some will receive FM wide (like commercial FM
stations use).
CW and SSB would be much harder for the casual listener to intercept.
A savvy
scanner user could tap the IF and run the IF signal to a SW receiver
to allow CW and
SSB reception.

There are all sorts of odd possibilities for obscure radio comms.
There are a large number
of odd frequencies between 30 and 50MHz and the 72~76MHz range are
ignored by most
people.

Frequency hopping is not all that hard to implement.

The really prepared prepper would have the ability to build and
operate a MW station.
Something like 1000KHz or 1MHz could be usefull to reach the masses.
Assuming
of course the masses had either batteries left or crank powered
receivers. Or after it
all falls apart one could simple operate AM or SSB in the current FM
BCB or TV band.
I doubt if the FCC will be handing out cease and desist orders after
TSHTF.

Ones choice of communication depends upon on what one needs to do.

For daily comms my wife and I have the option of using 2M. I might
have to climb
to the roof of where I work, but we can talk the 12 miles with 100mA
from that
height.

For comms with some friends scattered around the central Kentucky
region we use
2M via repeaters or QRP CW NVIS. We played with 10M but decided on
something
more 'secure'. Secure is an odd word here because 5W with a decent
NVIS antenna
will give you a circle of communication of at least 100 miles. That
includes the mountainous
counties in eastern KY. It is odd to be a deep cut for a road and to
be able to 'talk' 100
miles.


I have a couple of friends who live in line of sight from a fairly
tall mountain to clark county.
They have a nice WiFi link using Pringles can antennas. They also use
a set of WWII
Navy CW hand held 'flashers'. The bulb stays on, and the trigger moves
a shutter out of the
way. They have modified their units to use white LEDs and IR LEDs and
tossed the shutter.
It is odd to work CW via an optical path that is about 15 miles long.

We had a 10G gunplexer but it was to twitchy and drifted like a super
regenitive set.

Terry
Bart Bailey
2008-01-20 13:54:30 UTC
Permalink
In Message-ID:<***@4ax.com> posted on
Sat, 19 Jan 2008 17:44:31 -0800, Sum Ting Wong wrote: Begin
Post by Sum Ting Wong
Post by Bart Bailey
I suppose it depends on with whom I wish to communicate,
and for what reason.
With that in mind, a random length dipole fed with 450 ohm twinlead
and a balanced tuner will let you communicate on just about any HF
frequency that your transceiver covers. It goes without saying that
the radio is modified (unlocked) so it can transmit anywhere you need
to.
S.T.W.
I use a 4:1 balun to feed the outer shield of the local cable company's
drop on one side and about a 15 foot run to a ground stake on the other.
It loads (with an auto tuner doing the sweetening) all but 6m.
h***@hotmail.com
2008-01-21 13:33:40 UTC
Permalink
In
Begin  
Post by s***@live.com
What are you going to do when the commercial telephone systems fails?
I suppose it depends on with whom I wish to communicate,
and for what reason.
http://www.ramseyelectronics.com/cgi-bin/commerce.exe?preadd=action&key=SS70C

Here's what the link claims:

"Decode all that garbled gibberish!

Full duplex operation allows scrambling and descrambling at the same
time
Bypass mode provides quick change from direct audio to descramble (no
moving wires)
Communicate in total privacy over your radio! This is the popular
SS70A descrambler/scrambler that you've read about in all the Scanner
and Electronic magazines. The technology used within the unit is known
as speech inversion which is compatible with many police department
systems; hook it up to your scanner speaker terminals and you're in
business. (However, always be sure to check with your local
authorities to ensure that you're not straying into any unlawful
communications reception.) The SS70A is full duplex in operation - you
can scramble and unscramble at the same time. Easily configured for
any use! Easy to build since all complex circuitry is contained in a
custom ASIC chip which provides clear, clean audio. Powered by 9 to
15VDC, with 3.5mm mini phone type input/output jacks. The included
case measures 5"W x 11/2"H x 51/4"D."

Has anyone ever considered that listening and not talking might be the
best strategy until it is absolutely necessary to communicate? Is
there a capability to communicate without casual listeners knowing
your business?

I've puzzled over the above item for almost a decade. It would be
illegal in amateur radio, and probably the other radio services under
FCC control.

Has anyone actually tried this item?
Bart Bailey
2008-01-21 13:47:14 UTC
Permalink
In
Message-ID:<b0344039-82bd-43df-bedd-***@s27g2000prg.googlegroups.com>
posted on Mon, 21 Jan 2008 05:33:40 -0800 (PST),
Post by h***@hotmail.com
I've puzzled over the above item for almost a decade. It would be
illegal in amateur radio, and probably the other radio services under
FCC control.
FRS/GMRS handy talkies often include this primitive scrambling system,
at least the two I have do, or you can find computer based audio
applications that do it.
Here's one, no guarantee; http://tinyurl.com/3eyxfz
Post by h***@hotmail.com
Has anyone actually tried this item?
A friend tried one and as I recall it was sorta unstable and flaky
as all Ramsey kits are reputed to be.
kayakkhan
2008-01-22 03:54:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bart Bailey
In
Begin
Post by s***@live.com
What are you going to do when the commercial telephone systems fails?
I suppose it depends on with whom I wish to communicate,
and for what reason.
http://www.ramseyelectronics.com/cgi-bin/commerce.exe?preadd=action&key=SS70C

Here's what the link claims:

"Decode all that garbled gibberish!

Full duplex operation allows scrambling and descrambling at the same
time
Bypass mode provides quick change from direct audio to descramble (no
moving wires)
Communicate in total privacy over your radio! This is the popular
SS70A descrambler/scrambler that you've read about in all the Scanner
and Electronic magazines. The technology used within the unit is known
as speech inversion which is compatible with many police department
systems; hook it up to your scanner speaker terminals and you're in
business. (However, always be sure to check with your local
authorities to ensure that you're not straying into any unlawful
communications reception.) The SS70A is full duplex in operation - you
can scramble and unscramble at the same time. Easily configured for
any use! Easy to build since all complex circuitry is contained in a
custom ASIC chip which provides clear, clean audio. Powered by 9 to
15VDC, with 3.5mm mini phone type input/output jacks. The included
case measures 5"W x 11/2"H x 51/4"D."

Has anyone ever considered that listening and not talking might be the
best strategy until it is absolutely necessary to communicate? Is
there a capability to communicate without casual listeners knowing
your business?

I've puzzled over the above item for almost a decade. It would be
illegal in amateur radio, and probably the other radio services under
FCC control.

Has anyone actually tried this item?

Forget about it HH, it's a simple inversion device, not worth the $ and
trouble. If you need to send a private message, a quick and easy method
still in use today by many military forces is the Jefferson Cypher Wheel
(and its derivatives). Its integrity as a code system is largely intact even
today, and you can make one for a few bucks.
If google doesn't help you, let me know and I'll post directions on its
construction and use.
Jerry
2008-01-22 04:59:19 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 05:33:40 -0800 (PST),
http://www.ramseyelectronics.com/cgi-bin/commerce.exe?preadd=3Daction&key=3D=
SS70C
I've puzzled over the above item for almost a decade. It would be
illegal in amateur radio, and probably the other radio services under
FCC control.
Has anyone actually tried this item?
I'm sure somebody has, and probably paid a hefty price too. From their
website:

It is the policy of Ramsey Electronics, Inc., that knowing and
observing the lawful use of all kits is a first responsibility of our
kit user/builders. We do not endorse any unlawful use of any of our
kits, and we try to give you as much common sense help about normal
and lawful use as we can. Further, it is the policy of Ramsey
Electronics, Inc., to cooperate with all applicable federal
regulations in the design and marketing of our electronics kit
products. Finally, we urge all of our overseas customers to observe
the regulations of their own national telecommunications authorities.
In all instances, compliance with FCC rules in the operation of what
the FCC terms an "intentional radiator" is always the responsibility
of the user of such an "intentional radiator".

Ramsey Electronics, Inc. only offers this information to make the user
aware of the full impact a transmitter can have. In no way should this
brief discussion be construed as a definition of the FCC rules, it is
the users obligation to obtain a copy of the rules and operate legally
according to them. Ramsey Electronics, Inc. makes no representation as
to the following discussion being legally correct - it is simply
offered as an introduction to the responsibilities that a user must
realize. To order your copy of the FCC rules part 15, call the US
Government, Superintendent of Documents, at 202-512-1800, or fax at
202-512-2250. To order the correct document, ask for "CFR Title 17:
Parts 1 to 199." The cost is $24.00. Master Card and Visa are
accepted.
s***@live.com
2008-01-29 18:10:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry
On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 05:33:40 -0800 (PST),
http://www.ramseyelectronics.com/cgi-bin/commerce.exe?preadd=3Daction...
SS70C
I've puzzled over the above item for almost a decade. It would be
illegal in amateur radio, and probably the other radio services under
FCC control.
Has anyone actually tried this item?
I'm sure somebody has, and probably paid a hefty price too. From their
It is the policy of Ramsey Electronics, Inc., that knowing and
observing the lawful use of all kits is a first responsibility of our
kit user/builders. We do not endorse any unlawful use of any of our
kits, and we try to give you as much common sense help about normal
and lawful use as we can. Further, it is the policy of Ramsey
Electronics, Inc., to cooperate with all applicable federal
regulations in the design and marketing of our electronics kit
products. Finally, we urge all of our overseas customers to observe
the regulations of their own national telecommunications authorities.
In all instances, compliance with FCC rules in the operation of what
the FCC terms an "intentional radiator" is always the responsibility
of the user of such an "intentional radiator".
Ramsey Electronics, Inc. only offers this information to make the user
aware of the full impact a transmitter can have. In no way should this
brief discussion be construed as a definition of the FCC rules, it is
the users obligation to obtain a copy of the rules and operate legally
according to them. Ramsey Electronics, Inc. makes no representation as
to the following discussion being legally correct - it is simply
offered as an introduction to the responsibilities that a user must
realize. To order your copy of the FCC rules part 15, call the US
Government, Superintendent of Documents, at 202-512-1800, or fax at
Parts 1 to 199." The cost is $24.00. Master Card and Visa are
accepted.
The FCC regs are available on line for free.

<http://www.fcc.gov/oet/info/rules/>

Unless you came to the attention of a radio user with some "pull",
IE police, fire aircraft, EMT and the like, I doubt if the FCC would
bother
you.

The FCC is into selling the soon to be vacant rf spectrum from analog
TV.

FCC enforcement is something of a sad joke.

It is almost always a bad idea to set up shop on any ham bands.

Like rabid badgers they will defend what is "theirs". Most areas have
hams skilled in RDF and they will hunt down VHF/UHF operators fairly
quickly. A fool stole a ham's 2M HT and it took us about 30 minutes to
find him. A phone call to a cop who is also a ham recovered the HT
and the guy was busted for grand larceny.

Fox hunts are fun!!!!!!

There are illegal comms in the lower HF bands from many users.
The foul mouthed fishers are hard to describe. Coastal illegals
have been at if for at least 30 years and I have never read about
a bust.

Freebanders operate above and below US CB 11 meters, 27MHz and
there is an ongoing skirmish between the freebanders and hams in
the low 28MHz frequency range.

Pick some VHF-Lo, 30~50MHz, frequency that isn't being used
locally and I doubt if anyone would ever hear you much less care.

There are pirate stations scattered around 6MHz that voice everything
from extremely far left, right and the downright weird (Undercover
radio).

The primary advantage of getting a ham license is the fact that you
can
learn to use your radio, learn to manage a net etc before an
emergency.

As has been pointed out, the disadvantage is your ham call is listed
in many public data bases that normally include your home address.
It is possible to use a US postal mailbox under certain conditions,
but that still leaves your name available on line.

Data bases also exist that allow you to search by full name,
state, class of license, call letters and damn near anything
you can think of.

Being listed in a publicly accessible database doesn't make me happy,
but in the event of "a serious it all goes to hell event", we won't
be
were any publicly available sources might list.

A quick search showed:

Technician C Frank Gilliland CO USA

I don't know if this our Fran, and don't care, I just used it as an
example
of what is out there. But if it is Fran, a ?Tech? license, man I am so
not impressed.

Terry
Too_Many_Tools
2008-01-29 21:28:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@live.com
Post by Jerry
On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 05:33:40 -0800 (PST),
http://www.ramseyelectronics.com/cgi-bin/commerce.exe?preadd=3Daction...
SS70C
I've puzzled over the above item for almost a decade.  It would be
illegal in amateur radio, and probably the other radio services under
FCC control.
Has anyone actually tried this item?
I'm sure somebody has, and probably paid a hefty price too. From their
It is the policy of Ramsey Electronics, Inc., that knowing and
observing the lawful use of all kits is a first responsibility of our
kit user/builders. We do not endorse any unlawful use of any of our
kits, and we try to give you as much common sense help about normal
and lawful use as we can. Further, it is the policy of Ramsey
Electronics, Inc., to cooperate with all applicable federal
regulations in the design and marketing of our electronics kit
products. Finally, we urge all of our overseas customers to observe
the regulations of their own national telecommunications authorities.
In all instances, compliance with FCC rules in the operation of what
the FCC terms an "intentional radiator" is always the responsibility
of the user of such an "intentional radiator".
Ramsey Electronics, Inc. only offers this information to make the user
aware of the full impact a transmitter can have. In no way should this
brief discussion be construed as a definition of the FCC rules, it is
the users obligation to obtain a copy of the rules and operate legally
according to them. Ramsey Electronics, Inc. makes no representation as
to the following discussion being legally correct - it is simply
offered as an introduction to the responsibilities that a user must
realize. To order your copy of the FCC rules part 15, call the US
Government, Superintendent of Documents, at 202-512-1800, or fax at
Parts 1 to 199." The cost is $24.00. Master Card and Visa are
accepted.
The FCC regs are available on line for free.
<http://www.fcc.gov/oet/info/rules/>
Unless you came to the attention of a radio user with some "pull",
IE police, fire aircraft, EMT and the like, I doubt if the FCC would
bother
you.
The FCC is into selling the soon to be vacant rf spectrum from analog
TV.
FCC enforcement  is something of a sad joke.
It is almost always a bad idea to set up shop on any ham bands.
Like rabid badgers they will defend what is "theirs". Most areas have
hams skilled in RDF and they will hunt down VHF/UHF operators fairly
quickly. A fool stole a ham's 2M HT and it took us about 30 minutes to
find him. A phone call to a cop who is also a ham recovered the HT
and the guy was busted for grand larceny.
Fox hunts are fun!!!!!!
There are illegal comms in the lower HF bands from many users.
The foul mouthed fishers are hard to describe. Coastal illegals
have been at if for at least 30 years and I have never read about
a bust.
Freebanders operate above and below US CB 11 meters, 27MHz and
there is an ongoing skirmish between the freebanders and hams in
the low 28MHz frequency range.
Pick some VHF-Lo, 30~50MHz, frequency that isn't being used
locally and I doubt if anyone would ever hear you much less care.
There are pirate stations scattered around 6MHz that voice everything
from extremely far left, right and the downright weird (Undercover
radio).
The primary advantage of getting a ham license is the fact that you
can
learn to use your radio, learn to manage a net etc before an
emergency.
As has been pointed out, the disadvantage is your ham call is listed
in many public data bases that normally include your home address.
It is possible to use a US postal mailbox under certain conditions,
but that still leaves your name available on line.
Data bases also exist that allow you to search by full name,
state, class of license, call letters and damn near anything
you can think of.
Being listed in a publicly accessible database doesn't make me happy,
but in the event of "a serious it all goes to hell event", we won't
be
were any publicly available sources might list.
        Technician      C Frank Gilliland       CO      USA
I don't know if this our Fran, and don't care, I just used it as an
example
of what is out there. But if it is Fran, a ?Tech? license, man I am so
not impressed.
Terry- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
FWIW...the publicly accessible database license listing would be a
shopping list for those who wish to acquire comm gear when SHTF.

It also allows your neighbors to know that you have comm gear.


TMT
s***@live.com
2008-01-30 00:02:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Too_Many_Tools
Post by s***@live.com
Post by Jerry
On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 05:33:40 -0800 (PST),
http://www.ramseyelectronics.com/cgi-bin/commerce.exe?preadd=3Daction...
SS70C
I've puzzled over the above item for almost a decade. It would be
illegal in amateur radio, and probably the other radio services under
FCC control.
Has anyone actually tried this item?
I'm sure somebody has, and probably paid a hefty price too. From their
It is the policy of Ramsey Electronics, Inc., that knowing and
observing the lawful use of all kits is a first responsibility of our
kit user/builders. We do not endorse any unlawful use of any of our
kits, and we try to give you as much common sense help about normal
and lawful use as we can. Further, it is the policy of Ramsey
Electronics, Inc., to cooperate with all applicable federal
regulations in the design and marketing of our electronics kit
products. Finally, we urge all of our overseas customers to observe
the regulations of their own national telecommunications authorities.
In all instances, compliance with FCC rules in the operation of what
the FCC terms an "intentional radiator" is always the responsibility
of the user of such an "intentional radiator".
Ramsey Electronics, Inc. only offers this information to make the user
aware of the full impact a transmitter can have. In no way should this
brief discussion be construed as a definition of the FCC rules, it is
the users obligation to obtain a copy of the rules and operate legally
according to them. Ramsey Electronics, Inc. makes no representation as
to the following discussion being legally correct - it is simply
offered as an introduction to the responsibilities that a user must
realize. To order your copy of the FCC rules part 15, call the US
Government, Superintendent of Documents, at 202-512-1800, or fax at
Parts 1 to 199." The cost is $24.00. Master Card and Visa are
accepted.
The FCC regs are available on line for free.
<http://www.fcc.gov/oet/info/rules/>
Unless you came to the attention of a radio user with some "pull",
IE police, fire aircraft, EMT and the like, I doubt if the FCC would
bother
you.
The FCC is into selling the soon to be vacant rf spectrum from analog
TV.
FCC enforcement is something of a sad joke.
It is almost always a bad idea to set up shop on any ham bands.
Like rabid badgers they will defend what is "theirs". Most areas have
hams skilled in RDF and they will hunt down VHF/UHF operators fairly
quickly. A fool stole a ham's 2M HT and it took us about 30 minutes to
find him. A phone call to a cop who is also a ham recovered the HT
and the guy was busted for grand larceny.
Fox hunts are fun!!!!!!
There are illegal comms in the lower HF bands from many users.
The foul mouthed fishers are hard to describe. Coastal illegals
have been at if for at least 30 years and I have never read about
a bust.
Freebanders operate above and below US CB 11 meters, 27MHz and
there is an ongoing skirmish between the freebanders and hams in
the low 28MHz frequency range.
Pick some VHF-Lo, 30~50MHz, frequency that isn't being used
locally and I doubt if anyone would ever hear you much less care.
There are pirate stations scattered around 6MHz that voice everything
from extremely far left, right and the downright weird (Undercover
radio).
The primary advantage of getting a ham license is the fact that you
can
learn to use your radio, learn to manage a net etc before an
emergency.
As has been pointed out, the disadvantage is your ham call is listed
in many public data bases that normally include your home address.
It is possible to use a US postal mailbox under certain conditions,
but that still leaves your name available on line.
Data bases also exist that allow you to search by full name,
state, class of license, call letters and damn near anything
you can think of.
Being listed in a publicly accessible database doesn't make me happy,
but in the event of "a serious it all goes to hell event", we won't
be
were any publicly available sources might list.
Technician C Frank Gilliland CO USA
I don't know if this our Fran, and don't care, I just used it as an
example
of what is out there. But if it is Fran, a ?Tech? license, man I am so
not impressed.
Terry- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
FWIW...the publicly accessible database license listing would be a
shopping list for those who wish to acquire comm gear when SHTF.
It also allows your neighbors to know that you have comm gear.
TMT
That was why I used the advanced search function to demonstrate how
easy it is to look
someone up. If I had bothered to log in I would have been given street
address, and lat/long.

Given the number of inactive hams I know, I suspect a lot of would be
scavengers may be
SOL. And of the active hams that I know, over 50, all but 2 have
significant firearms and it
would be my bet that they would not hesitate to dispense high justice
on the scene.

For several years I was the 'victim' of a cyber-stalker. He took
serious exception to a comment
I made in rec.radio.shortwave regarding antennas. I was unaware of his
intense efforts to hound
me. He went after the mail servers of a place I used to work and
crashed their entire net.

It was only when my current employers mail server was attacked that I
became aware of his actions.

I baited him with some unpleasant comments about his personal hygiene,
sexual habits and his
limited intelligence. With the help of some skilled data geeks, I
managed to snag an IP which we
tracked to a physical address and with some simple cross reference
work came up with a name.

The kicker was he was on probation for this type of crap before. So I
contacted the approbriate
authorities with the logs of his attacks and they stuffed him back in
the pen. He clearly didn't
know when to keep his mouth shut because he died after several
particularly brutal beatings
and sexual attacks. I can't say I have any pity for the SOB because he
damn near cost me
my job!

It cost me $75 to find out more then I thought possible. I obtained
his banking records, driving
record, prior busts, computer crime and pot sales. Anyone who thinks
their private data is
private is deluded. For a lot less money then most people understand,
anyone can learn
everything about you. I had his SS#, his parents birth and death
dates, you name it. ID
theft is ridiculously easy. Put a lock on any credit activity and
check your credit history
at least once a month.

Survival, to me, means more the simply pushing air, it includes having
my credit wrecked,
my life savings stolen or someone using my ID for some "dirty deed".

On a related topic, anyone running a WiFi hub/router had damn better
be certain they have it
secure. A single friend of my wife got visited by the FBI/secrete
service/US Marshals. She had
tried to secure her router, but left an opening that a "kiddie
pornographer" used to upload a
bunch a disturbing images. The only thing that saved her from more
complications was the fact
that she was in California at her mothers for the 2 weeks this
happened over. They went through
all of her digital data. They gave her the choice of letting their
tech team do it on site, or they
would get a warrant and haul it away to a lab for analysis.


Terry
h***@hotmail.com
2008-01-30 01:31:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@live.com
Post by Too_Many_Tools
Post by s***@live.com
Post by Jerry
On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 05:33:40 -0800 (PST),
http://www.ramseyelectronics.com/cgi-bin/commerce.exe?preadd=3Daction...
SS70C
I've puzzled over the above item for almost a decade.  It would be
illegal in amateur radio, and probably the other radio services under
FCC control.
Has anyone actually tried this item?
I'm sure somebody has, and probably paid a hefty price too. From their
It is the policy of Ramsey Electronics, Inc., that knowing and
observing the lawful use of all kits is a first responsibility of our
kit user/builders. We do not endorse any unlawful use of any of our
kits, and we try to give you as much common sense help about normal
and lawful use as we can. Further, it is the policy of Ramsey
Electronics, Inc., to cooperate with all applicable federal
regulations in the design and marketing of our electronics kit
products. Finally, we urge all of our overseas customers to observe
the regulations of their own national telecommunications authorities.
In all instances, compliance with FCC rules in the operation of what
the FCC terms an "intentional radiator" is always the responsibility
of the user of such an "intentional radiator".
Ramsey Electronics, Inc. only offers this information to make the user
aware of the full impact a transmitter can have. In no way should this
brief discussion be construed as a definition of the FCC rules, it is
the users obligation to obtain a copy of the rules and operate legally
according to them. Ramsey Electronics, Inc. makes no representation as
to the following discussion being legally correct - it is simply
offered as an introduction to the responsibilities that a user must
realize. To order your copy of the FCC rules part 15, call the US
Government, Superintendent of Documents, at 202-512-1800, or fax at
Parts 1 to 199." The cost is $24.00. Master Card and Visa are
accepted.
The FCC regs are available on line for free.
<http://www.fcc.gov/oet/info/rules/>
Unless you came to the attention of a radio user with some "pull",
IE police, fire aircraft, EMT and the like, I doubt if the FCC would
bother
you.
The FCC is into selling the soon to be vacant rf spectrum from analog
TV.
FCC enforcement  is something of a sad joke.
It is almost always a bad idea to set up shop on any ham bands.
Like rabid badgers they will defend what is "theirs". Most areas have
hams skilled in RDF and they will hunt down VHF/UHF operators fairly
quickly. A fool stole a ham's 2M HT and it took us about 30 minutes to
find him. A phone call to a cop who is also a ham recovered the HT
and the guy was busted for grand larceny.
Fox hunts are fun!!!!!!
There are illegal comms in the lower HF bands from many users.
The foul mouthed fishers are hard to describe. Coastal illegals
have been at if for at least 30 years and I have never read about
a bust.
Freebanders operate above and below US CB 11 meters, 27MHz and
there is an ongoing skirmish between the freebanders and hams in
the low 28MHz frequency range.
Pick some VHF-Lo, 30~50MHz, frequency that isn't being used
locally and I doubt if anyone would ever hear you much less care.
There are pirate stations scattered around 6MHz that voice everything
from extremely far left, right and the downright weird (Undercover
radio).
The primary advantage of getting a ham license is the fact that you
can
learn to use your radio, learn to manage a net etc before an
emergency.
As has been pointed out, the disadvantage is your ham call is listed
in many public data bases that normally include your home address.
It is possible to use a US postal mailbox under certain conditions,
but that still leaves your name available on line.
Data bases also exist that allow you to search by full name,
state, class of license, call letters and damn near anything
you can think of.
Being listed in a publicly accessible database doesn't make me happy,
but in the event of "a serious it all goes to hell event", we won't
be
were any publicly available sources might list.
        Technician      C Frank Gilliland       CO      USA
I don't know if this our Fran, and don't care, I just used it as an
example
of what is out there. But if it is Fran, a ?Tech? license, man I am so
not impressed.
Terry- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
FWIW...the publicly accessible database license listing would be a
shopping list for those who wish to acquire comm gear when SHTF.
It also allows your neighbors to know that you have comm gear.
TMT
That was why I used the advanced search function to demonstrate how
easy it is to look
someone up. If I had bothered to log in I would have been given street
address, and lat/long.
Given the number of inactive hams I know, I suspect a lot of would be
scavengers may be
SOL. And of the active hams that I know, over 50, all but 2 have
significant firearms and it
would be my bet that they would not hesitate to dispense high justice
on the scene.
For several years I was the 'victim' of a cyber-stalker. He took
serious exception to a comment
I made in rec.radio.shortwave regarding antennas. I was unaware of his
intense efforts to hound
me. He went after the mail servers of a place I used to work and
crashed their entire net.
It was only when my current employers mail server was attacked that I
became aware of his actions.
I baited him with some unpleasant comments about his personal hygiene,
sexual habits and his
limited intelligence. With the help of some skilled data geeks, I
managed to snag an IP which we
tracked to a physical address and with some simple cross reference
work came up with a name.
The kicker was he was on probation for this type of crap before. So I
contacted the approbriate
authorities with the logs of his attacks and they stuffed him back in
the pen. He clearly didn't
know when to keep his mouth shut because he died after several
particularly brutal beatings
and sexual attacks. I can't say I have any pity for the SOB because he
damn near cost me
my job!
It cost me $75 to find out more then I thought possible. I obtained
his banking records, driving
record, prior busts, computer crime and pot sales. Anyone who thinks
their private data is
private is deluded. For a lot less money then most people understand,
anyone can learn
everything about you. I had his SS#, his parents birth and death
dates, you name it. ID
theft is ridiculously easy. Put a lock on any credit activity and
check your credit history
at least once a month.
Survival, to me, means more the simply pushing air, it includes having
my credit wrecked,
my life savings stolen or someone using my ID for some "dirty deed".
On a related topic, anyone running a WiFi hub/router had damn better
be certain they have it
secure. A single friend of my wife got visited by the FBI/secrete
service/US Marshals. She had
tried to secure her router, but left an opening that a "kiddie
pornographer" used to upload a
bunch a disturbing images. The only thing that saved her from more
complications was the fact
that she was in California at her mothers for the 2 weeks this
happened over. They went through
all of her digital data. They gave her the choice of letting their
tech team do it on site, or they
would get a warrant and haul it away to a lab for analysis.
Terry- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Yeh. We had a stalker over on one of the groups who took joy in first
using the FCC database to post a person's info, then connect that with
the phone number database, then to the county auditor's database;
photos and floor plans. Sure it's all available publicly if you
search for it, but this individual then posted it to the group. Then
I think it escalated to the $15 background checks, phone calls to the
Sheriff, offers of visits, etc.
Jerry
2008-01-30 02:41:46 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 29 Jan 2008 13:28:38 -0800 (PST), Too_Many_Tools
Post by Too_Many_Tools
FWIW...the publicly accessible database license listing would be a
shopping list for those who wish to acquire comm gear when SHTF.
It also allows your neighbors to know that you have comm gear.
TMT
It would be easier to just look for the antenna on the roof of a house
or on a car. The neighbor would already know.

What the database won't tell you is if the operator is using a base
station, car radio or handy-talky, so the bad neighbor could end up
getting killed for nothing, the radio gear might not be on site.

The FCC only requires an address that they can mail to. Any address
will work. Their only rule is that your license will be suspended if
mail is returned to them as undeliverable. Lots of hams use P.O.
Boxes, work addresses, or even old addresses with mail forwarding. A
listing in the database means little more than a listing in the White
Pages.

Radio gear in the hands of a non-operator is only worth what they
could get in a pawn shop. The big screen TV in your house is probably
worth more than Joe Ham's *average* radio. There are some nice rigs
though, but you won't find them in a database listing.

s***@live.com
2008-01-29 18:20:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bart Bailey
In
Begin
Post by s***@live.com
What are you going to do when the commercial telephone systems fails?
I suppose it depends on with whom I wish to communicate,
and for what reason.
http://www.ramseyelectronics.com/cgi-bin/commerce.exe?preadd=action&k...
"Decode all that garbled gibberish!
Full duplex operation allows scrambling and descrambling at the same
time
Bypass mode provides quick change from direct audio to descramble (no
moving wires)
Communicate in total privacy over your radio! This is the popular
SS70A descrambler/scrambler that you've read about in all the Scanner
and Electronic magazines. The technology used within the unit is known
as speech inversion which is compatible with many police department
systems; hook it up to your scanner speaker terminals and you're in
business. (However, always be sure to check with your local
authorities to ensure that you're not straying into any unlawful
communications reception.) The SS70A is full duplex in operation - you
can scramble and unscramble at the same time. Easily configured for
any use! Easy to build since all complex circuitry is contained in a
custom ASIC chip which provides clear, clean audio. Powered by 9 to
15VDC, with 3.5mm mini phone type input/output jacks. The included
case measures 5"W x 11/2"H x 51/4"D."
Has anyone ever considered that listening and not talking might be the
best strategy until it is absolutely necessary to communicate? Is
there a capability to communicate without casual listeners knowing
your business?
I've puzzled over the above item for almost a decade. It would be
illegal in amateur radio, and probably the other radio services under
FCC control.
Has anyone actually tried this item?
Many years ago some police departments used speech inversion for
"Secure" communication. Some Kenwood FRS HTs offer this limited
security even today. The Kenwood SI FRS offer reasonable security.
Their limited range with the speech inversion should defeat casual
intercepts.

I think the mere possession of such a device is a felony in some
states,
and maybe even by the feds. I seem to recall a prohibition against any
device designed to decipher/descramble any LEO comms. It has been
too many years since I researched this topic so do your own research!

There are computer programs that do the inversion or un-inversion that
use full duplex sound cards.



Terry
kayakkhan
2008-01-20 01:03:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@live.com
Over the years there have been many threads and flame wars over
"communicaiton".
Many people have the vague idea that they can purchase a "ham radio
and talk to the world".
The main problem I see with that idea is that the skill set needed to
effectively use a
radio and this is especially true for HF (2MHz~30MHz). I doubt if one
in a hundred EEs
could take a HF transceiver new from the box, take coax and wire and
build and effective
antenna and actually use it.
Years ago when was much wiser and only lurked in the group someone had
the sig ;
"Dig the well before you are thirsty".
A USA ham license is less then $10. There is no longer any CW/Morse
code requirement.
While you can just memorize the test pool, you can also learn enough
about electricity to
understand how many devices work. I am not claiming that even getting
the highest class
ham license will give you the skill set to rewire your home, but it
sure won't hurt you.
Getting a ham license could give you the skill set to understand how
to match a generator
to the expected load(s). Even if you have to hire an electrician to do
your electrical work,
his words will stop being some sort of magic incantation and convey
meaning to you.
So now for the nitty gritty, what type comm gear do you have and why.
I will start the list.
Kenwood R20000 SW receiver
AOR 7030+
Drake R8B
Kenwood TS-930S (with mods)
Icom IC-28A for home
Icom IC-28A for wife's car
Icom IC-u2AT wife's carry HT
Icom IC-28A for my car
Icom IC-2AT in my desk at work
Icom IC-2AT at my parents
HTX-202 in my car
Pay as you go Cell/PCS phones in each car.
Plain old telephone at home
PC with multimode digital capacity at home.
Multiple FRS units
Multiple 27MHz SSB mobiles
Modified commercial 70cM to ham operation HTs
Modified commercial 70cM to ham operation mobile as a base station.
Military Field Telephones
Home made 5W multiband QRP (low power) transmitters [CW only]
The Kenwood TS-930S with accessories are packed in a multi-layered EMP
and physical transport case. In a worst case situation it would serve
as a
good SW receiver and would allow reliable worldwide comms conditions
permitting.
While I hold an extra class ham license I seldom transmit. Except for
local Sky
Warn nets during nasty storms and some recent experiments with NVIS, I
simply
don't have much desire to talk to the world.
In an 'end of the world' situation I doubt if I would be doing any HF
or CB transmitting.
Mostly low power 2M or FRS, and damn little of that. But I suspect I
won't live long
enough to see the 'end of the world", or even the 'fall of western
civilization', I do
expect to see storms that take down the local power and comm grid, I
wouldn't
be all that surprised if the New Madrid Fault lets go and that would
be very interesting.
Many of us laugh at Gunner and company who choose to live in
earthquake prone
californica, but they at least know how to plan and cope with them.
Here in the central
US, many are in for a rude shock when the New Madrid cuts loose.
Most of my comm needs involve getting help if my car breaks down or
daily comms
with my wife and a few friends.
The military surplus field phones are for a true SHTF and we have to
relocate to a more
remote preplanned 'retreat'. Sounds too corny but it covers the truth
well enough.
What are you going to do when the commercial telephone systems fails?
Think of
Katrina, even the cell/PCS system has weaknesses that will allow large
area disruptions.
A CB is only going to be of very minimal use, limited range and many
users. FRS
has even shorter range. MURS approaches 2M ham for range. And GMRS can
give
very good coverage if you have access to a repeater. 2M can have a
very wide, as in
multiple state, range with repeaters that are linked. But the wider
the coverage the
more users and less likely the system will not fold.
Terry
At Home:
Yaesu FT-817 (portable, QRP)
Proven in the field for SAR in mountain rescue around my home. Handles
Digital

Optus 2way Satellite Internet
Doesn't fall over when the power goes out

Icom 706MKIIG (1 Vehicle, 1 home)
Nice, clean 100watts out, manpack portable if necessary, handles digital
happily.
Icom PCR 1000
Icom PCR 1500 (x2)
Cheap effective, IF allows for WX sat reception, Milsat. Software allows
unlimited channel storage and multiple rig control. Easily field portable.

GyratorIII VLF
Just because I like VLF

Assorted homebrew Lowfers
It's fun and cheap

Icom R8500
Great performance, portable, only just.

Uniden GPS105 UHF CB (Vehicle)
Uniden UH019 UHF CB (Home)
I like to know what's happening on the highway

Icom IC91A (x2) Handhelds

Kenwood TR9000 (x3, boat anchors)
Unbreakable, good standbys. Old and clunky, but don't need a solder reflow
unit to fix.

Software: (rig control, digital, various decoding)
Skysweeper Pro 5.12
Spectrum Lab on VLF
HRD for shortwave
APTDecoder for WX Satellites
Spectrum Commander for scanning
PDW for Pocsag (Pagers)
Airnav Suite for ACARS (aircraft)
AISMon for AIS (shipping)
ATCS Monitor (Trains)
Winlink2000 digital messaging
Echolink (repeater)

I guess I don't own those below, but they are used on a regular basis.

At Work:
Mostly Rhode & Schwartz

Volunteering
Codan 2110 Manpack+3212 HF Modem (Red Cross)
with HF Express and UUPlus digital data comms.

IC-M810GMDSS (Volunteer Coast Guard)
IC-M88 Handheld (Volunteers Coast Guard)
kayakkhan
2008-01-20 06:21:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@live.com
Over the years there have been many threads and flame wars over
"communicaiton".
Many people have the vague idea that they can purchase a "ham radio
and talk to the world".
The main problem I see with that idea is that the skill set needed to
effectively use a
radio and this is especially true for HF (2MHz~30MHz). I doubt if one
in a hundred EEs
could take a HF transceiver new from the box, take coax and wire and
build and effective
antenna and actually use it.
Years ago when was much wiser and only lurked in the group someone had
the sig ;
"Dig the well before you are thirsty".
A USA ham license is less then $10. There is no longer any CW/Morse
code requirement.
While you can just memorize the test pool, you can also learn enough
about electricity to
understand how many devices work. I am not claiming that even getting
the highest class
ham license will give you the skill set to rewire your home, but it
sure won't hurt you.
Getting a ham license could give you the skill set to understand how
to match a generator
to the expected load(s). Even if you have to hire an electrician to do
your electrical work,
his words will stop being some sort of magic incantation and convey
meaning to you.
So now for the nitty gritty, what type comm gear do you have and why.
I will start the list.
Kenwood R20000 SW receiver
AOR 7030+
Drake R8B
Kenwood TS-930S (with mods)
Icom IC-28A for home
Icom IC-28A for wife's car
Icom IC-u2AT wife's carry HT
Icom IC-28A for my car
Icom IC-2AT in my desk at work
Icom IC-2AT at my parents
HTX-202 in my car
Pay as you go Cell/PCS phones in each car.
Plain old telephone at home
PC with multimode digital capacity at home.
Multiple FRS units
Multiple 27MHz SSB mobiles
Modified commercial 70cM to ham operation HTs
Modified commercial 70cM to ham operation mobile as a base station.
Military Field Telephones
Home made 5W multiband QRP (low power) transmitters [CW only]
The Kenwood TS-930S with accessories are packed in a multi-layered EMP
and physical transport case. In a worst case situation it would serve
as a
good SW receiver and would allow reliable worldwide comms conditions
permitting.
While I hold an extra class ham license I seldom transmit. Except for
local Sky
Warn nets during nasty storms and some recent experiments with NVIS, I
simply
don't have much desire to talk to the world.
In an 'end of the world' situation I doubt if I would be doing any HF
or CB transmitting.
Mostly low power 2M or FRS, and damn little of that. But I suspect I
won't live long
enough to see the 'end of the world", or even the 'fall of western
civilization', I do
expect to see storms that take down the local power and comm grid, I
wouldn't
be all that surprised if the New Madrid Fault lets go and that would
be very interesting.
Many of us laugh at Gunner and company who choose to live in
earthquake prone
californica, but they at least know how to plan and cope with them.
Here in the central
US, many are in for a rude shock when the New Madrid cuts loose.
Most of my comm needs involve getting help if my car breaks down or
daily comms
with my wife and a few friends.
The military surplus field phones are for a true SHTF and we have to
relocate to a more
remote preplanned 'retreat'. Sounds too corny but it covers the truth
well enough.
What are you going to do when the commercial telephone systems fails?
Think of
Katrina, even the cell/PCS system has weaknesses that will allow large
area disruptions.
A CB is only going to be of very minimal use, limited range and many
users. FRS
has even shorter range. MURS approaches 2M ham for range. And GMRS can
give
very good coverage if you have access to a repeater. 2M can have a
very wide, as in
multiple state, range with repeaters that are linked. But the wider
the coverage the
more users and less likely the system will not fold.
Terry
At Home:
Yaesu FT-817 (portable, QRP)
Proven in the field for SAR in mountain rescue around my home. Handles
Digital

Optus 2way Satellite Internet
Doesn't fall over when the power goes out

Icom 706MKIIG (1 Vehicle, 1 home)
Nice, clean 100watts out, manpack portable if necessary, handles digital
happily.
Icom PCR 1000
Icom PCR 1500 (x2)
Cheap effective, IF allows for WX sat reception, Milsat. Software allows
unlimited channel storage and multiple rig control. Easily field portable.

GyratorIII VLF
Just because I like VLF

Assorted homebrew Lowfers
It's fun and cheap

Icom R8500
Great performance, portable, only just.

Uniden GPS105 UHF CB (Vehicle)
Uniden UH019 UHF CB (Home)
I like to know what's happening on the highway

Icom IC91A (x2) Handhelds

Kenwood TR9000 (x3, boat anchors)
Unbreakable, good standbys. Old and clunky, but don't need a solder reflow
unit to fix.

Software: (rig control, digital, various decoding)
Skysweeper Pro 5.12
Spectrum Lab on VLF
HRD for shortwave
APTDecoder for WX Satellites
Spectrum Commander for scanning
PDW for Pocsag (Pagers)
Airnav Suite for ACARS (aircraft)
AISMon for AIS (shipping)
ATCS Monitor (Trains)
Winlink2000 digital messaging
Echolink (repeater)

I guess I don't own those below, but they are used on a regular basis.

At Work:
Mostly Rhode & Schwartz

Volunteering
Codan 2110 Manpack+3212 HF Modem (Red Cross)
with HF Express and UUPlus digital data comms.

IC-M810GMDSS (Volunteer Coast Guard)
IC-M88 Handheld (Volunteers Coast Guard)
Jerry
2008-01-20 20:53:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@live.com
What are you going to do when the commercial telephone systems fails?
My comm equipment
- Nokia cellphone with T-Mobile prepaid minutes
- Motorola pager Verizon service
- FRS radios
- Radio Shack Pro95 scanner
- Yaesu VX-7R (unlocked) with the stock rubber duck and an additional
aftermarket 17" flexible whip antenna

The Yaesu HT could be considered a quad band in the US, plus it has
AM/FM/TV/Weather and Shortwave reception.

The HT will suffice for any emergency communications, my area is super
repeater rich, and probably hundreds of hams in simplex range.

I would relay any important long distance messages if needed, any long
distance contacts I would need to make could probably wait until comms
are restored.

As for the ham license, it is possible to get one without learning a
darn thing about electricity or electronics. I talked to one ham about
what power supply they were using, and they told me that they couldn't
answer because their background wasn't exactly "mechanical". When I
pointed out that they meant "electrical" , their response was
"whatever".

However, aside from emergency comms, who would I want to talk to? My
friends and family look at hams as a bunch of old fart geeks, and for
the most part, they aren't that far off the mark. Most on the air
conversations are about which stores have trousers on sale with a
senior discount, or which restaraunt has good coffee and melba toast
in the bread basket.

I have little doubt that when all other communications fail, the hams
will be the ones that will get the messages through, but for me it's
either convince friends and family to become hams (not likely) or to
change my friends and family to people who are already hams :)

Lots of people to talk to face-to-face around here as well , and there
would probably be a lot to talk about.
Lazarus Long
2008-01-21 04:32:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@live.com
So now for the nitty gritty, what type comm gear do you have and why.
I will start the list.
Kenwood R20000 SW receiver
AOR 7030+
Drake R8B
Kenwood TS-930S (with mods)
Icom IC-28A for home
Icom IC-28A for wife's car
Icom IC-u2AT wife's carry HT
Icom IC-28A for my car
Icom IC-2AT in my desk at work
Icom IC-2AT at my parents
HTX-202 in my car
Pay as you go Cell/PCS phones in each car.
Plain old telephone at home
PC with multimode digital capacity at home.
Multiple FRS units
Multiple 27MHz SSB mobiles
Modified commercial 70cM to ham operation HTs
Modified commercial 70cM to ham operation mobile as a base station.
Military Field Telephones
Home made 5W multiband QRP (low power) transmitters [CW only]
Terry
I've been a Ham for more than a decade.

HTX-202 2m HT - Yes, it still works. I've had this radio for 13 years and
wouldn't trade it for all the tea in China. It's tough (been dropped off a
two story roof), throws out 7 watts with 13.5V. It's easy to use, program
and is very very dependable. Great RX and TX audio. Best HT I have ever
owned. Not a lot of bells and whistles just good quality. Great capacity
with aftermarket NiMH battery pack.

Icom IC-746 - HF, 6m, 2m, Multi Mode. This baby is older but it really
pulls signals out of the hash. This is my primary shortwave reciever also.
100 ft dipole, 6m yagi and 2m yagi round out the antennas for this unit.
Battery backup using marine batteries and a charger. Have everything to go
solar but have not hooked it up.


Laz
none2u
2008-01-21 07:10:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lazarus Long
Post by s***@live.com
So now for the nitty gritty, what type comm gear do you have and why.
I will start the list.
Kenwood R20000 SW receiver
AOR 7030+
Drake R8B
Kenwood TS-930S (with mods)
Icom IC-28A for home
Icom IC-28A for wife's car
Icom IC-u2AT wife's carry HT
Icom IC-28A for my car
Icom IC-2AT in my desk at work
Icom IC-2AT at my parents
HTX-202 in my car
Pay as you go Cell/PCS phones in each car.
Plain old telephone at home
PC with multimode digital capacity at home.
Multiple FRS units
Multiple 27MHz SSB mobiles
Modified commercial 70cM to ham operation HTs
Modified commercial 70cM to ham operation mobile as a base station.
Military Field Telephones
Home made 5W multiband QRP (low power) transmitters [CW only]
Terry
I've been a Ham for more than a decade.
HTX-202 2m HT - Yes, it still works. I've had this radio for 13 years and
wouldn't trade it for all the tea in China. It's tough (been dropped off a
two story roof), throws out 7 watts with 13.5V. It's easy to use, program
and is very very dependable. Great RX and TX audio. Best HT I have ever
owned. Not a lot of bells and whistles just good quality. Great capacity
with aftermarket NiMH battery pack.
Icom IC-746 - HF, 6m, 2m, Multi Mode. This baby is older but it really
pulls signals out of the hash. This is my primary shortwave reciever also.
100 ft dipole, 6m yagi and 2m yagi round out the antennas for this unit.
Battery backup using marine batteries and a charger. Have everything to go
solar but have not hooked it up.
Post by s***@live.com
I got a Kaito Ka 1103, A Kaito KA33 indoor loop antenna, line phone,
yahoo email, Outlook express, and that's about all I need. I,d love to
get a transceiver up and running easily that could work world wide. And
you are right about people not being able to set up antennas . But I
firmly believe the FCC is going to allow noise to make the long range SW
bands useless enough to justify shutting them down for US SW uses
anyways. Isolation is a great weapon .
Chuck James
2008-01-28 02:48:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lazarus Long
Post by s***@live.com
So now for the nitty gritty, what type comm gear do you have and why.
I will start the list.
Kenwood R20000 SW receiver
AOR 7030+
Drake R8B
Kenwood TS-930S (with mods)
Icom IC-28A for home
Icom IC-28A for wife's car
Icom IC-u2AT wife's carry HT
Icom IC-28A for my car
Icom IC-2AT in my desk at work
Icom IC-2AT at my parents
HTX-202 in my car
Pay as you go Cell/PCS phones in each car.
Plain old telephone at home
PC with multimode digital capacity at home.
Multiple FRS units
Multiple 27MHz SSB mobiles
Modified commercial 70cM to ham operation HTs
Modified commercial 70cM to ham operation mobile as a base station.
Military Field Telephones
Home made 5W multiband QRP (low power) transmitters [CW only]
Terry
I've been a Ham for more than a decade.
HTX-202 2m HT - Yes, it still works. I've had this radio for 13 years and
wouldn't trade it for all the tea in China. It's tough (been dropped off a
two story roof), throws out 7 watts with 13.5V. It's easy to use, program
and is very very dependable. Great RX and TX audio. Best HT I have ever
owned. Not a lot of bells and whistles just good quality. Great capacity
with aftermarket NiMH battery pack.
Icom IC-746 - HF, 6m, 2m, Multi Mode. This baby is older but it really
pulls signals out of the hash. This is my primary shortwave reciever also.
100 ft dipole, 6m yagi and 2m yagi round out the antennas for this unit.
Battery backup using marine batteries and a charger. Have everything to go
solar but have not hooked it up.
Laz
Yaesu FT-857, 160 meters through 70 cm, all mode 100 Watts connected to 12
volt battery, and 25 Amp power supply.
Yaesu FT-8900, 70 cm, 2 meter, 6 meter, 10 meter FM & Packet 50 Watts
Yaesu FT-7800, 70 cm, 2 meter FM 50 Watts
Yaesu VX-6R, 70 cm, 1.25 meter, and 2 meter FM HT 5 Watts, with VOX headset
Radio Shack HTX-202, 2 meter HT 5 Watts
Several FRS/GRMS radios
Older 23 channel CB in the truck 5 Watts
Blackberry Cell phone with internet capability
garlicman
2008-01-21 12:22:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@live.com
Over the years there have been many threads and flame wars over
"communicaiton".
Many people have the vague idea that they can purchase a "ham radio
and talk to the world".
The main problem I see with that idea is that the skill set needed to
effectively use a
radio and this is especially true for HF (2MHz~30MHz). I doubt if one
in a hundred EEs
could take a HF transceiver new from the box, take coax and wire and
build and effective
antenna and actually use it.
Years ago when was much wiser and only lurked in the group someone had
the sig ;
"Dig the well before you are thirsty".
A USA ham license is less then $10. There is no longer any CW/Morse
code requirement.
While you can just memorize the test pool, you can also learn enough
about electricity to
understand how many devices work. I am not claiming that even getting
the highest class
ham license will give you the skill set to rewire your home, but it
sure won't hurt you.
Getting a ham license could give you the skill set to understand how
to match a generator
to the expected load(s). Even if you have to hire an electrician to do
your electrical work,
his words will stop being some sort of magic incantation and convey
meaning to you.
So now for the nitty gritty, what type comm gear do you have and why.
I will start the list.
Kenwood R20000 SW receiver
AOR 7030+
Drake R8B
Kenwood TS-930S (with mods)
Icom IC-28A for home
Icom IC-28A for wife's car
Icom IC-u2AT wife's carry HT
Icom IC-28A for my car
Icom IC-2AT in my desk at work
Icom IC-2AT at my parents
HTX-202 in my car
Pay as you go Cell/PCS phones in each car.
Plain old telephone at home
PC with multimode digital capacity at home.
Multiple FRS units
Multiple 27MHz SSB mobiles
Modified commercial 70cM to ham operation HTs
Modified commercial 70cM to ham operation mobile as a base station.
Military Field Telephones
Home made 5W multiband QRP (low power) transmitters [CW only]
The Kenwood TS-930S with accessories are packed in a multi-layered EMP
and physical transport case. In a worst case situation it would serve
as a
good SW receiver and would allow reliable worldwide comms conditions
permitting.
While I hold an extra class ham license I seldom transmit. Except for
local Sky
Warn nets during nasty storms and some recent experiments with NVIS, I
simply
don't have much desire to talk to the world.
In an 'end of the world' situation I doubt if I would be doing any HF
or CB transmitting.
Mostly low power 2M or FRS, and damn little of that. But I suspect I
won't live long
enough to see the 'end of the world", or even the 'fall of western
civilization', I do
expect to see storms that take down the local power and comm grid, I
wouldn't
be all that surprised if the New Madrid Fault lets go and that would
be very interesting.
Many of us laugh at Gunner and company who choose to live in
earthquake prone
californica, but they at least know how to plan and cope with them.
Here in the central
US, many are in for a rude shock when the New Madrid cuts loose.
Most of my comm needs involve getting help if my car breaks down or
daily comms
with my wife and a few friends.
The military surplus field phones are for a true SHTF and we have to
relocate to a more
remote preplanned 'retreat'. Sounds too corny but it covers the truth
well enough.
What are you going to do when the commercial telephone systems fails?
Think of
Katrina, even the cell/PCS system has weaknesses that will allow large
area disruptions.
A CB is only going to be of very minimal use, limited range and many
users. FRS
has even shorter range. MURS approaches 2M ham for range. And GMRS can
give
very good coverage if you have access to a repeater. 2M can have a
very wide, as in
multiple state, range with repeaters that are linked. But the wider
the coverage the
more users and less likely the system will not fold.
Terry
You said, "A USA ham license is less then $10. There is no longer any
CW/Morse code requirement."

The license is free. You pay an examination fee. I took my Technician test
in 2001 for $15. I took my General test last year for $20. This is what all
the clubs in my area are charging for test fees.

I have:

Yaesu FT-990: Full-size, multi-mode 160m through 10m
Yaesu VX-5: 6m, 2m, and 70cm with wide-range receive
Yaesu FT-2200: VHF mobile w/50W out

These three Yaesu transceivers can all run off my emergency power.

FRS/GMRS transceivers: These are great for my boys and family outings
CBs and scanners, rarely used
Standard land line phone
Wife's cell phone
VOIP phone
Computer

I just ordered the SoftRock RX/TX 6.2 for 40m and 80m. Just $30 for the kit
and free software. It plugs into your USB port and puts out 1W.
Bart Bailey
2008-01-21 13:04:01 UTC
Permalink
In Message-ID:<***@comcast.com> posted on
Mon, 21 Jan 2008 04:22:51 -0800, garlicman wrote: Begin
Post by garlicman
The license is free. You pay an examination fee. I took my Technician test
in 2001 for $15. I took my General test last year for $20. This is what all
the clubs in my area are charging for test fees.
I heard the local Sandarc VEC was now charging an administration fee
around here too but don't know how much, my club tests were included in
the membership back in those days.
Post by garlicman
Yaesu FT-990: Full-size, multi-mode 160m through 10m
My HF only rig is an Icom IC-756Pro3 driving an Icom PW1,
but band coverage is limited by available antennas.
Post by garlicman
Yaesu VX-5: 6m, 2m, and 70cm with wide-range receive
I had one of those and can attest to its utility, reluctantly sold it a
few years ago and now have a Kenwood TH-F6, also a tri-bander but with
220 instead of six, wide freq coverage including some SW, even receives
SSB.
Post by garlicman
Yaesu FT-2200: VHF mobile w/50W out
My V/UHF rig is an all band all mode Kenwood TS-2000
used exclusively on a tri-band (6,2,440) antenna.
Post by garlicman
These three Yaesu transceivers can all run off my emergency power.
All my rigs run on 12v, but I haven't set up any emergency supply yet
after my move last fall.
Post by garlicman
FRS/GMRS transceivers: These are great for my boys and family outings
CBs and scanners, rarely used
Yep, got FRS/GMRS Motorola talkabouts (T-6400 & T-7200) as well as an
old 40 channel AM only Uniden CB, plus a Bearcat BC780XLT to trunk track
the local PD etc. All of those also rarely used.
--
73 de
KM6RF
Bart
h***@hotmail.com
2008-01-22 03:29:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@live.com
Over the years there have been many threads and flame wars over
"communicaiton".
Many people have the vague idea that they can purchase a "ham radio
and talk to the world".
The main problem I see with that idea is that the skill set needed to
effectively use a
radio and this is especially true for HF (2MHz~30MHz). I doubt if one
in a hundred EEs
could take a HF transceiver new from the box, take coax and wire and
build and effective
antenna and actually use it.
TS-690SAT
IC M700
HR2600
RatShack CB
IC207
FT290RII
HT202
HT404
ADI-201
a couple of scanners and a sony 7600g
Too_Many_Tools
2008-01-28 03:35:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@live.com
Over the years there have been many threads and flame wars over
"communicaiton".
Many people have the vague idea that they can purchase a "ham radio
and talk to the world".
The main problem I see with that idea is that the skill set needed to
effectively use a
radio and this is especially true for HF (2MHz~30MHz). I doubt if one
in a hundred EEs
could take a HF transceiver new from the box, take coax and wire and
build and effective
antenna and actually use it.
Years ago when was much wiser and only lurked in the group someone had
the sig ;
"Dig the well before you are thirsty".
A USA ham license is less then $10. There is no longer any CW/Morse
code requirement.
While you can just memorize the test pool, you can also learn enough
about electricity to
understand how many devices work. I am not claiming that even getting
the highest class
ham license will give you the skill set to rewire your home, but it
sure won't hurt you.
Getting a ham license could give you the skill set to understand how
to match a generator
to the expected load(s). Even if you have to hire an electrician to do
your electrical work,
his words will stop being some sort of magic incantation and convey
meaning to you.
So now for the nitty gritty, what type comm gear do you have and why.
I will start the list.
Kenwood R20000 SW receiver
AOR 7030+
Drake R8B
Kenwood TS-930S (with mods)
Icom IC-28A for home
Icom IC-28A for wife's car
Icom IC-u2AT wife's carry HT
Icom IC-28A for my car
Icom IC-2AT in my desk at work
Icom IC-2AT at my parents
HTX-202 in my car
Pay as you go Cell/PCS phones in each car.
Plain old telephone at home
PC with multimode digital capacity at home.
Multiple FRS units
Multiple 27MHz SSB mobiles
Modified commercial 70cM to ham operation HTs
Modified commercial 70cM to ham operation mobile as a base station.
Military Field Telephones
Home made 5W multiband QRP (low power) transmitters [CW only]
The Kenwood TS-930S with accessories are packed in a multi-layered EMP
and physical transport case. In a worst case situation it would serve
as a
good SW receiver and would allow reliable worldwide comms conditions
permitting.
While I hold an extra class ham license I seldom transmit. Except for
local Sky
Warn nets during nasty storms and some recent experiments with NVIS, I
simply
don't have much desire to talk to the world.
In an 'end of the world' situation I doubt if I would be doing any HF
or CB transmitting.
Mostly low power 2M or FRS, and damn little of that. But I suspect I
won't live long
enough to see the 'end of the world", or even the 'fall of western
civilization', I do
expect to see storms that take down the local power and comm grid,  I
wouldn't
be all that surprised if the New Madrid Fault lets go and that would
be very interesting.
Many of us laugh at Gunner and company who choose to live in
earthquake prone
californica, but they at least know how to plan and cope with them.
Here in the central
US, many are in for a rude shock when the New Madrid cuts loose.
Most of my comm needs involve getting help if my car breaks down or
daily comms
with my wife and a few friends.
The military surplus field phones are for a true SHTF and we have to
relocate to a more
remote preplanned 'retreat'. Sounds too corny but it covers the truth
well enough.
What are you going to do when the commercial telephone systems fails?
Think of
Katrina, even the cell/PCS system has weaknesses that will allow large
area disruptions.
A CB is only going to be of very minimal use, limited range and many
users. FRS
has even shorter range. MURS approaches 2M ham for range. And GMRS can
give
very good coverage if you have access to a repeater. 2M can have a
very wide, as in
multiple state, range with repeaters that are linked. But the wider
the coverage the
more users and less likely the system will not fold.
Terry
Good subject and good discussion.

In my opinon, when SHTF the need for a license will disappear.

You will also not want someone to know who you are.

Anyone with a radio will use it any way they want.

TMT
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