Discussion:
How much light is enough?
(too old to reply)
Stormin Mormon
2007-09-10 01:06:04 UTC
Permalink
I spent money this week to buy some more camping gear to help work on my bug
out bag. I'm trying to make a fanny
pack for times away from the truck, but not enough away to grab my backpack.


I did find an oil lamp at the second hand shop, now I have two table top oil
lamps. This one, I'm not sure how much oil it holds. Likely about a quart.
It's got a glass base, and glass chimney. Walmart has three wicks for 97
cents, great price. My new lamp needed a wick. I have a couple bottles of
Ultra Pure lamp oil, but considering buying a couple more. I'm not sure how
long a quart or pint or whatever will last. Of course, depends how high you
turn the flame. Anyone out there give me some pointers?

In March I used my propane lantern for a friend who had his power turned
off. Two mantles run about eight hours on a pound of propane (wide open, max
brightness and heat setting). Gander Mountain sports has an adaptor. Short
brass adaptor allows you to run 16 ounce appliances on a 20 pound tank. With
the $10 right angle adaptor, I can run a lantern right off the gas grill
propane tank. With that plus the $17 hose, I could run a lantern near the
ceiling, or a camp stove on a table. Anyone out there used the bulk adpator,
or the adaptor plus hose? I've tried the refill gadget, but the small 16
ounce tanks usually leak.

And there are my supply of candles, which are light but not much heat. I've
got some plasic drinking glass I use for molds. The glass is about six
ounces. A candle made in that mold burns about three hours. I'm wondering if
I should buy some of the tall "pillar" candles. It looks like they would be
safer. Since there is so much glass around them, less likely to light a
fire. Build a wall holder? Just light a pillar candle in the bathroom, and
one in the living room.

I've got a candle melting kit, I can melt paraffin wax, or other candles,
and pour them into molds. Dollar Tree has 18 candles for a buck, I can put
one in the 6 ounce glass, and pour wax around it. That works nicely for
making candles that last a while.

I'm doing OK for both flash lights and batteries. Well, at least I think I'm
OK. As I've heard from people in hurricane zones,
cold light such as flash lights is much better than hot light like propane
or Coleman or kerosene burining light sources. When it's 95 and humid, you
really don't want to be burning propane.

I've got some 6 volt lantern batteries, and some D cells. But how many is
enough? Also have some AA and AAA cells. The AA cells I use in my mini mag,
and also in my pager. So, I do try to keep plenty of those. As for AAA, I
bought a couple from ebay, and still have a few.

I was in Walmart the other day. They have fluorescent lanterns for about
$20, which take four D cells. These look totally neat. I got at a garage
sale, a fluorescent lantern that runs on 12 volts. Eight D cells, which were
corroded. I ran that to a length of speaker wire, and a lighter plug, so now
i have a 12 volt lighter socket fluorescent lantern. Someday, I'll rig that
to two square lantern batteries, and it will then be portable.

The camping fluorescent lanterns sure look neat. I keep telling myself I've
got enough lanterns and stuff, but is there ever really enough? Sigh. so
many toys, so little money.

How do you know when you have enough? I'm sure I'll make it through the next
two or three day power cut with plenty of light sources.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
http://www.lds.org/portal/site/LDSOrg
http://www.mormon.org/mormonorg/eng/
.
Jerry
2007-09-10 03:57:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stormin Mormon
I spent money this week to buy some more camping gear to help work on my bug
out bag. I'm trying to make a fanny
pack for times away from the truck, but not enough away to grab my backpack.
I did find an oil lamp at the second hand shop, now I have two table top oil
lamps. This one, I'm not sure how much oil it holds. Likely about a quart.
It's got a glass base, and glass chimney. Walmart has three wicks for 97
cents, great price. My new lamp needed a wick. I have a couple bottles of
Ultra Pure lamp oil, but considering buying a couple more. I'm not sure how
long a quart or pint or whatever will last. Of course, depends how high you
turn the flame. Anyone out there give me some pointers?
In March I used my propane lantern for a friend who had his power turned
off. Two mantles run about eight hours on a pound of propane (wide open, max
brightness and heat setting). Gander Mountain sports has an adaptor. Short
brass adaptor allows you to run 16 ounce appliances on a 20 pound tank. With
the $10 right angle adaptor, I can run a lantern right off the gas grill
propane tank. With that plus the $17 hose, I could run a lantern near the
ceiling, or a camp stove on a table. Anyone out there used the bulk adpator,
or the adaptor plus hose? I've tried the refill gadget, but the small 16
ounce tanks usually leak.
And there are my supply of candles, which are light but not much heat. I've
got some plasic drinking glass I use for molds. The glass is about six
ounces. A candle made in that mold burns about three hours. I'm wondering if
I should buy some of the tall "pillar" candles. It looks like they would be
safer. Since there is so much glass around them, less likely to light a
fire. Build a wall holder? Just light a pillar candle in the bathroom, and
one in the living room.
I've got a candle melting kit, I can melt paraffin wax, or other candles,
and pour them into molds. Dollar Tree has 18 candles for a buck, I can put
one in the 6 ounce glass, and pour wax around it. That works nicely for
making candles that last a while.
I'm doing OK for both flash lights and batteries. Well, at least I think I'm
OK. As I've heard from people in hurricane zones,
cold light such as flash lights is much better than hot light like propane
or Coleman or kerosene burining light sources. When it's 95 and humid, you
really don't want to be burning propane.
I've got some 6 volt lantern batteries, and some D cells. But how many is
enough? Also have some AA and AAA cells. The AA cells I use in my mini mag,
and also in my pager. So, I do try to keep plenty of those. As for AAA, I
bought a couple from ebay, and still have a few.
I was in Walmart the other day. They have fluorescent lanterns for about
$20, which take four D cells. These look totally neat. I got at a garage
sale, a fluorescent lantern that runs on 12 volts. Eight D cells, which were
corroded. I ran that to a length of speaker wire, and a lighter plug, so now
i have a 12 volt lighter socket fluorescent lantern. Someday, I'll rig that
to two square lantern batteries, and it will then be portable.
The camping fluorescent lanterns sure look neat. I keep telling myself I've
got enough lanterns and stuff, but is there ever really enough? Sigh. so
many toys, so little money.
How do you know when you have enough? I'm sure I'll make it through the next
two or three day power cut with plenty of light sources.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
http://www.lds.org/portal/site/LDSOrg
http://www.mormon.org/mormonorg/eng/
.
I think you need to decide how much light you are going to need, and for how
long. As an example, my last camping trip was over Labor Day weekend. I
brought a single mantle propane lantern with one bottle. I also had a
Princeton Tec Aurora LED headlamp which runs 150 hours on 3 AAA batteries. I
also had a mini maglite.

I hiked to my campsite during the day, so no need for light. I have pitched
my tent quite easily before during the night using the headlamp, but did not
use it at all this time. In about 1.5 hours I was able to gather wood and
make a campfire area near the tent using some small boulders I found.

My lighter broke after one or two strikes, I think the spring under the
flint rusted out. The waterproof matches did not want to light very well, so
I lit a small candle first, and used that to start the kindling. When the
fire had burned a while, I cooked some potatoes wrapped in aluminum over the
coals. Afterwards I went to bed and had never used the lantern or headlamp
at all. I did use the mini-maglite inside the tent for less than 5 minutes.
I had lots of wood left over, enough to keep the fire alive for a few more
hours.

My recommendation for the bugout bag is to keep it as lightweight as you can
and just get the Aurora headlamp with some extra AAA batteries, a long
lasting candle, and a good lighter. Use a fire if you are camping, otherwise
use the darkness as a good time to sleep. My pack could have been lighter if
I would have left the lantern and propane in the car. The weight savings
could have been used for something else, or just to make the journey easier.
Bart Bailey
2007-09-10 07:24:53 UTC
Permalink
In Message-ID:<***@comcast.com> posted on
Sun, 9 Sep 2007 22:57:58 -0500, Jerry wrote: Begin
Post by Jerry
just get the Aurora headlamp with some extra AAA batteries,
Might want to get some of the new Sanyo Eneloop batteries, have
comparable output to alkalines, don't self discharge like other NiMH,
and if you make it back from the wilderness you can recharge them for
the next time.
--
Bart
b***@yahoo.com
2007-09-10 08:32:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bart Bailey
Sun, 9 Sep 2007 22:57:58 -0500, Jerry wrote: Begin
Post by Jerry
just get the Aurora headlamp with some extra AAA batteries,
Might want to get some of the new Sanyo Eneloop batteries, have
comparable output to alkalines, don't self discharge like other NiMH,
and if you make it back from the wilderness you can recharge them for
the next time.
Fanny pack:
1 swiss pocket knife
1 candle and square of aluminum
1 space blanket
2 energy bars
1 qt. zip-lock bag
1 Bic lighter
1 small pack tissues
1 whistle
1 mirror
1 water purification device, maybe straws
2 paper water filters
1 small bottle water disinfectant
1 small bottle bug repellant or maybe head net
1 pt. zip-lock bag containing a wet sponge and plastic card for toilet
1 compass
1 map of area
1 bic pen and small note pad

On your belt you can have:
1 sheath knife
1 machete
1 military-type folding canteen with filter
1 can pepper spray

In your backpack, with frame and waist belt, you can have:
1 pup tent
1 sleeping bag
1 jungle hammock with rain fly and net
1 shelter half
1 poncho
1 folding cross-cut saw
1 crank radio-light-battery charger
1 container of small tools and hardware
1 container of hunting/fishing/trapping stuff
1 container of fire-making stuff
1 medical kit
1 zip-lock bag containing bottles of detergent, antiseptic,
disinfectant, etc.
2 meat sacks
100' of para-cord with bungees
Food supplies
Clothing

You also carry:
1 rifle with sling, ammo
Stormin Mormon
2007-09-10 13:45:27 UTC
Permalink
<***@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:***@4ax.com...
: On Mon, 10 Sep 2007 00:24:53 -0700, Bart Bailey <***@privacy.net>
: wrote:

: Fanny pack:
: 1 swiss pocket knife
: 1 candle and square of aluminum

CY: The candle puts out light, but not sure about the pocket knife.

: 1 space blanket
: 2 energy bars
: 1 qt. zip-lock bag

CY: Are these light sources?

: 1 Bic lighter
: 1 small pack tissues
: 1 whistle
: 1 mirror
: 1 water purification device, maybe straws
: 2 paper water filters
: 1 small bottle water disinfectant
: 1 small bottle bug repellant or maybe head net
: 1 pt. zip-lock bag containing a wet sponge and plastic card for toilet
: 1 compass
: 1 map of area
: 1 bic pen and small note pad

CY: The lighter is good. But how would water straws put out light? Do they
burn?

:
: On your belt you can have:
: 1 sheath knife
: 1 machete
: 1 military-type folding canteen with filter
: 1 can pepper spray

CY: oh, for gathering fire wood to light up?

:
: In your backpack, with frame and waist belt, you can have:
: 1 pup tent
: 1 sleeping bag
: 1 jungle hammock with rain fly and net
: 1 shelter half
: 1 poncho
: 1 folding cross-cut saw

CY: And these produce light, how?


: 1 crank radio-light-battery charger


: 1 container of small tools and hardware
: 1 container of hunting/fishing/trapping stuff
: 1 container of fire-making stuff
: 1 medical kit
: 1 zip-lock bag containing bottles of detergent, antiseptic,
: disinfectant, etc.
: 2 meat sacks
: 100' of para-cord with bungees
: Food supplies
: Clothing

CY:How do these relate to having enough light?

:
: You also carry:
: 1 rifle with sling, ammo

CY: How do these produce light?

:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
Retief
2007-09-11 03:18:04 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 10 Sep 2007 09:45:27 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"
Post by Stormin Mormon
: 1 swiss pocket knife
: 1 candle and square of aluminum
CY: The candle puts out light, but not sure about the pocket knife.
OK Stormin'... ;)

It looks like Bookburn was posting the contents of his fanny pack (so
it wasn't limited to light producing elements).
Post by Stormin Mormon
: 1 rifle with sling, ammo
CY: How do these produce light?
Stand on the receiving end, and find out... ;)

Retief
Stormin Mormon
2007-09-10 13:42:15 UTC
Permalink
The web site doesn't show them being avaiable in the USA.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
http://www.lds.org/portal/site/LDSOrg
http://www.mormon.org/mormonorg/eng/
.
"Bart Bailey" <***@privacy.net> wrote in message news:***@bart.spawar.mil...
: In Message-ID:<***@comcast.com> posted on
: Sun, 9 Sep 2007 22:57:58 -0500, Jerry wrote: Begin
:
: >just get the Aurora headlamp with some extra AAA batteries,
:
: Might want to get some of the new Sanyo Eneloop batteries, have
: comparable output to alkalines, don't self discharge like other NiMH,
: and if you make it back from the wilderness you can recharge them for
: the next time.
:
: --
:
: Bart
Bart Bailey
2007-09-10 17:32:31 UTC
Permalink
In Message-ID:<46e54ab0$1$19545$***@roadrunner.com> posted on Mon,
10 Sep 2007 09:42:15 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote: Begin
Post by Stormin Mormon
The web site doesn't show them being avaiable in the USA.
They're available in any number of places, got some at Fry's,
others at Ritz Camera, think I even saw some at WalMart.
--
Bart
Stormin Mormon
2007-09-10 13:18:54 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for the first hand report. I'm thining at home, for extended power
cuts. A couple thoughts from your writing.

First, 150 hours from a set of AAA batteries sounds a bit much. That's six
days, after all. Have you actually tried leaving it on and see how long it
really lasts? I've bought a light on Ebay that claimed 30 hours, and
actually got 3. I emailed them, and they said it depends on the quality of
the battery (I was using alkalines.)

Headlamps. One of my best ones is from Harbor Freight, takes two AA cells.
Has a bi-pin bulb. I pulled the bulb out, and replaced that with the Nite
Ize LED conversion from Walmart. Now, the lamp takes two AA cells which last
longer than AAA cells. And the LED don't silver and blow out like the
filament bulb. I think the light is better than the HF filament bulb, also.

Headlamps are incredibly handy because they put light usually where you need
it. And leaving both hands available for the work. I tried my head lamp
while doing a night time picnic recently, it's very useful.

Thanks, also, for the field report on the lighter. I do try to test mine
once a year or so. The Aim N Flame gadgets are really totally useful for
lighting lanterns, camp fires, etc.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
http://www.lds.org/portal/site/LDSOrg
http://www.mormon.org/mormonorg/eng/
.
"Jerry" <***@127.0.0.1> wrote in message news:***@comcast.com...
:
:
: I think you need to decide how much light you are going to need, and for
how
: long. As an example, my last camping trip was over Labor Day weekend. I
: brought a single mantle propane lantern with one bottle. I also had a
: Princeton Tec Aurora LED headlamp which runs 150 hours on 3 AAA batteries.
I
: also had a mini maglite.
:
: I hiked to my campsite during the day, so no need for light. I have
pitched
: my tent quite easily before during the night using the headlamp, but did
not
: use it at all this time. In about 1.5 hours I was able to gather wood and
: make a campfire area near the tent using some small boulders I found.
:
: My lighter broke after one or two strikes, I think the spring under the
: flint rusted out. The waterproof matches did not want to light very well,
so
: I lit a small candle first, and used that to start the kindling. When the
: fire had burned a while, I cooked some potatoes wrapped in aluminum over
the
: coals. Afterwards I went to bed and had never used the lantern or headlamp
: at all. I did use the mini-maglite inside the tent for less than 5
minutes.
: I had lots of wood left over, enough to keep the fire alive for a few more
: hours.
:
: My recommendation for the bugout bag is to keep it as lightweight as you
can
: and just get the Aurora headlamp with some extra AAA batteries, a long
: lasting candle, and a good lighter. Use a fire if you are camping,
otherwise
: use the darkness as a good time to sleep. My pack could have been lighter
if
: I would have left the lantern and propane in the car. The weight savings
: could have been used for something else, or just to make the journey
easier.
:
:
Retief
2007-09-11 03:18:04 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 10 Sep 2007 09:18:54 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"
Post by Stormin Mormon
Thanks for the first hand report. I'm thining at home, for extended power
cuts. A couple thoughts from your writing.
First, 150 hours from a set of AAA batteries sounds a bit much. That's six
My Rayovac LED flashlight claims "up to 200 hours" (on 3 AAAs). Yes,
it will get dim, but still usuable light (once your eyes adjust to the
dark, even a little light is "quite a bit"...).

I use it a few minutes every day, and change the batteries about once
per year (just because I decide it's time, not generally because it's
showing substantial dimming).

But we can do the math on the LED current drain:

http://www.duracell.com/oem/productdata/default.asp

The first graph on the AAA (MN1500) data page shows a 90 hour service
life, for 1V and 43 ohms (i.e. that's 23 mA at that point). Your
single LED is going to have substantially lower specs than that,
typically 20 mA at desired operating voltage (probably 4+ volts for a
white LED), and they exhibit a much lower current as the voltage
drops. Assuming 3 AAA in series, you are down to 3 volts at 90 hour,
you may be only pushing 5-10 mA.

Going to the next graph, service hours vs. current drain, you read
service life off. At 20 mA, you could expect between 100 and 200
hours.
Post by Stormin Mormon
days, after all. Have you actually tried leaving it on and see how long it
really lasts? I've bought a light on Ebay that claimed 30 hours, and
Regarding those little 1-AAA flashlights that you mentioned, I found
that mine will run 4-6 hours at reasonable brightness, and then will
trickle along (enough to read a map at close distance) for another 4-5
days...
Post by Stormin Mormon
Headlamps are incredibly handy because they put light usually where you need
it. And leaving both hands available for the work. I tried my head lamp
while doing a night time picnic recently, it's very useful.
Of course, that also puts a target right on your forehead (if things
get rough, and people started shooting at lights)...

Retief
Jerry
2007-09-11 03:41:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stormin Mormon
Thanks for the first hand report. I'm thining at home, for extended power
cuts. A couple thoughts from your writing.
First, 150 hours from a set of AAA batteries sounds a bit much. That's six
days, after all. Have you actually tried leaving it on and see how long it
really lasts?
Oops, that's 160 hours on low, 110 on medium, 50 on high. 200 hours on slow
flash.
http://www.ptsportlights.com/products/index.php?id=3&type=1&use=0

No, I haven't left it on for that long, but I do use it a lot and the
batteries to seem to last forever. The amount of light does decrease as time
goes by, but still enough to keep you from walking off a cliff. I will get
some fresh batteries tomorrow and see how long they last. I won't be able to
set up any fancy jig or graph the results, just the number of hours of
usable light.
Jerry
2007-09-13 04:33:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry
Post by Stormin Mormon
Thanks for the first hand report. I'm thining at home, for extended power
cuts. A couple thoughts from your writing.
First, 150 hours from a set of AAA batteries sounds a bit much. That's six
days, after all. Have you actually tried leaving it on and see how long it
really lasts?
Oops, that's 160 hours on low, 110 on medium, 50 on high. 200 hours on slow
flash.
http://www.ptsportlights.com/products/index.php?id=3&type=1&use=0
No, I haven't left it on for that long, but I do use it a lot and the
batteries to seem to last forever. The amount of light does decrease as time
goes by, but still enough to keep you from walking off a cliff. I will get
some fresh batteries tomorrow and see how long they last. I won't be able to
set up any fancy jig or graph the results, just the number of hours of
usable light.
Ok, new batteries installed and started test on low beam at 22:15 CST.
Jerry
2007-09-19 04:13:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry
Post by Jerry
Post by Stormin Mormon
Thanks for the first hand report. I'm thining at home, for extended
power
Post by Jerry
Post by Stormin Mormon
cuts. A couple thoughts from your writing.
First, 150 hours from a set of AAA batteries sounds a bit much. That's
six
Post by Jerry
Post by Stormin Mormon
days, after all. Have you actually tried leaving it on and see how
long
Post by Jerry
it
Post by Jerry
Post by Stormin Mormon
really lasts?
Oops, that's 160 hours on low, 110 on medium, 50 on high. 200 hours on
slow
Post by Jerry
flash.
http://www.ptsportlights.com/products/index.php?id=3&type=1&use=0
No, I haven't left it on for that long, but I do use it a lot and the
batteries to seem to last forever. The amount of light does decrease as
time
Post by Jerry
goes by, but still enough to keep you from walking off a cliff. I will get
some fresh batteries tomorrow and see how long they last. I won't be
able
Post by Jerry
to
Post by Jerry
set up any fancy jig or graph the results, just the number of hours of
usable light.
Ok, new batteries installed and started test on low beam at 22:15 CST.
Just remembered about the test and removed the headlamp from the bottom of
my backpack. It's just about 145 hours later and the light is still usable
enough to see what is under my desk without any problem, I would have no
trouble finding anything that I might have dropped. Reading a book at arms
length is also possible, although realistically I read my books from a
little bit closer. My guess is that it will make it to 160 hours as
advertised.
kangaroo16
2007-09-19 06:38:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry
Post by Jerry
Post by Jerry
Post by Stormin Mormon
Thanks for the first hand report. I'm thining at home, for extended
power
Post by Jerry
Post by Stormin Mormon
cuts. A couple thoughts from your writing.
First, 150 hours from a set of AAA batteries sounds a bit much. That's
six
Post by Jerry
Post by Stormin Mormon
days, after all. Have you actually tried leaving it on and see how
long
Post by Jerry
it
Post by Jerry
Post by Stormin Mormon
really lasts?
A "bit" much???
Post by Jerry
Post by Jerry
Post by Jerry
Oops, that's 160 hours on low, 110 on medium, 50 on high. 200 hours on
slow
Post by Jerry
flash.
http://www.ptsportlights.com/products/index.php?id=3&type=1&use=0
No, I haven't left it on for that long, but I do use it a lot and the
batteries to seem to last forever. The amount of light does decrease as
time
Post by Jerry
goes by, but still enough to keep you from walking off a cliff. I will
get
Post by Jerry
Post by Jerry
some fresh batteries tomorrow and see how long they last. I won't be
able
Post by Jerry
to
Post by Jerry
set up any fancy jig or graph the results, just the number of hours of
usable light.
Ok, new batteries installed and started test on low beam at 22:15 CST.
Just remembered about the test and removed the headlamp from the bottom of
my backpack. It's just about 145 hours later and the light is still usable
enough to see what is under my desk without any problem, I would have no
trouble finding anything that I might have dropped. Reading a book at arms
length is also possible, although realistically I read my books from a
little bit closer. My guess is that it will make it to 160 hours as
advertised.
From "AAA" cells as I use on my TV remote control? Or even "AA"
cells? 160 hours??? :-)

Not that necessarily disbelieve you, perhaps you can see in the
dark. Or your vision is phenomenally sensitive. Or you know
something that the rest of us don't about sources of light.

Please elucidate!

If your vision is good enough to get 160 hours of "usable" light
out of "AAA" cells in series or parallel, am sure that others in
this group want to know your secret!

As to vision, if you are correct, it would almost be enough to
convince me that extraterrestrials are indeed among us!

Either you, "Jerry", have extremely acute vision or have some
"AAA" cells beyond our current technology!

Um, but if you have such acute vision, why bother with an
artificial source of light at all? Plenty of light from stars in
the night sky, let alone the reflected light from the moon.

And if you have such superior technology as to produce such high
output and long life output from conventional "AAA" cells, or
have such an extremely efficient light source from their rather
limited output, just why are you wasting your time posting on
this, or any, group?

I'm certain that manufacturers of chemical cells or light sources
would be happy to have you on their research team...or leading
it?!

------

One reference:

Runtime Plot: With a single alkaline AAA cell, you should get
about 1.5 - 2 hours of good light before you see a sharp drop off
as a result of the light dropping out of regulation. After that
the light output diminishes over time, hitting 25% at about 6
hours. With the optional 2 AAA cell body you'll receive very good
regulation from two alkaline AAA cells for about 2.5 hours before
the light drops to a very low level. This long, dim "tail" gives
you enough light to root around and find replacement cells for
your light, or provides emergency level lighting for a long
period of time"

http://www.flashlightreviews.com/reviews/peakled_pacific.htm

I would have thought that contributors to any "survival groups"
would try to be more or less "realistic" but I could be in error.

I will try to "stick around" long enough to evaluate your reply.

At the moment, though, will tend to back " "Storming Mormon"!

....But if you are indeed an "extraterrestrial" do you need an
agent to reveal your talents to we who are confined to
this solar system?

If so, am sure that you have even more important secrets which
you might be willing to share with the rest of us?

Propulsion of cars or tractors on water? Eternal life on this
earth? Know everything there is to know?

If so, I might be willing to act as your agent here.....

My society from the planet xyppt hasn't got this far.

Please communicate by hyperspace relay, code xxyuowmoue/2
5469763/ nemuy87/ siemwmuv or on this group.

Fluzzipppy,
xxyuowmoue/2 5469763/ nemuy87/ siemwmuv
Stormin Mormon
2007-09-19 12:16:19 UTC
Permalink
The ad said 200 hours at "slow flash". So, it's only a speck of light every
however many seconds. Giving the cells plenty of time to relax between slow
flashes. Now, it makes more sense.

Still, "high" would presumably be all three LED going full time. Makes me
wonder if there is a module so they aren't on full time, but rapid flash?
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
http://www.lds.org/portal/site/LDSOrg
http://www.mormon.org/mormonorg/eng/
.
"kangaroo16" <***@invalid.com> wrote in message news:***@4ax.com...
: > Oops, that's 160 hours on low, 110 on medium, 50 on high. 200 hours on
: > slow
: > flash.
: > http://www.ptsportlights.com/products/index.php?id=3&type=1&use=0
: >
: >Just remembered about the test and removed the headlamp from the bottom
of
: >my backpack. It's just about 145 hours later and the light is still
usable
: >enough to see what is under my desk without any problem, I would have no
: >trouble finding anything that I might have dropped. Reading a book at
arms
: >length is also possible, although realistically I read my books from a
: >little bit closer. My guess is that it will make it to 160 hours as
: >advertised.
: >
: From "AAA" cells as I use on my TV remote control? Or even "AA"
: cells? 160 hours??? :-)
:
: Not that necessarily disbelieve you, perhaps you can see in the
: dark. Or your vision is phenomenally sensitive. Or you know
: something that the rest of us don't about sources of light.
:
: Please elucidate!
:
: If your vision is good enough to get 160 hours of "usable" light
: out of "AAA" cells in series or parallel, am sure that others in
: this group want to know your secret!
:
: As to vision, if you are correct, it would almost be enough to
: convince me that extraterrestrials are indeed among us!
:
: Either you, "Jerry", have extremely acute vision or have some
: "AAA" cells beyond our current technology!
:
: Um, but if you have such acute vision, why bother with an
: artificial source of light at all? Plenty of light from stars in
: the night sky, let alone the reflected light from the moon.
:
: And if you have such superior technology as to produce such high
: output and long life output from conventional "AAA" cells, or
: have such an extremely efficient light source from their rather
: limited output, just why are you wasting your time posting on
: this, or any, group?
:
: I'm certain that manufacturers of chemical cells or light sources
: would be happy to have you on their research team...or leading
: it?!
:
: ------
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
Jerry
2007-09-20 03:20:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stormin Mormon
The ad said 200 hours at "slow flash". So, it's only a speck of light every
however many seconds. Giving the cells plenty of time to relax between slow
flashes. Now, it makes more sense.
Still, "high" would presumably be all three LED going full time. Makes me
wonder if there is a module so they aren't on full time, but rapid flash?
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
http://www.lds.org/portal/site/LDSOrg
http://www.mormon.org/mormonorg/eng/
.
: > Oops, that's 160 hours on low, 110 on medium, 50 on high. 200 hours on
: > slow
: > flash.
: > http://www.ptsportlights.com/products/index.php?id=3&type=1&use=0
: >
: >Just remembered about the test and removed the headlamp from the bottom
of
: >my backpack. It's just about 145 hours later and the light is still
usable
: >enough to see what is under my desk without any problem, I would have no
: >trouble finding anything that I might have dropped. Reading a book at
arms
: >length is also possible, although realistically I read my books from a
: >little bit closer. My guess is that it will make it to 160 hours as
: >advertised.
: >
: From "AAA" cells as I use on my TV remote control? Or even "AA"
: cells? 160 hours??? :-)
: Not that necessarily disbelieve you, perhaps you can see in the
: dark. Or your vision is phenomenally sensitive. Or you know
: something that the rest of us don't about sources of light.
: Please elucidate!
: If your vision is good enough to get 160 hours of "usable" light
: out of "AAA" cells in series or parallel, am sure that others in
: this group want to know your secret!
: As to vision, if you are correct, it would almost be enough to
: convince me that extraterrestrials are indeed among us!
: Either you, "Jerry", have extremely acute vision or have some
: "AAA" cells beyond our current technology!
: Um, but if you have such acute vision, why bother with an
: artificial source of light at all? Plenty of light from stars in
: the night sky, let alone the reflected light from the moon.
: And if you have such superior technology as to produce such high
: output and long life output from conventional "AAA" cells, or
: have such an extremely efficient light source from their rather
: limited output, just why are you wasting your time posting on
: this, or any, group?
: I'm certain that manufacturers of chemical cells or light sources
: would be happy to have you on their research team...or leading
: it?!
: ------
Now about 23 hours later, so that would make 168 hours. Light appears as
bright as yesterday. Found a dime and the USB connector for my Ipod shuffle
under my desk in a totally dark room. Can read a paperback book with no
problem. Can change a set of batteries in my camera and distinguish between
what is plugged into which electrical outlet easily. Batteries are regular
Walgreen's super alkaline AAA's. I'm surprised that they lasted past the 160
hours, the light still looks as bright as yesterday, unscientifically, but
it works for me.

A word about the flash, it's not just a speck. It's a bright flash that
could be spotted from a distance. If used only at night, it would work well
as a beacon for anyone searching for you at night.

The price of this headlamp has dropped almost 10 bucks since I bought mine,
I have a few, one for each family member. We get good use on campouts or
just reading at night. I might buy some more at this new price.

It has 3 steady settings, high, medium and low, plus two flash settings,
fast and slow.
I would recommend highly. You will be surprised. My test was on low, steady
light. I'll bet it goes to 175 hours no problem. My batteries were fresh.
Jerry
2007-09-21 02:04:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry
Post by Stormin Mormon
The ad said 200 hours at "slow flash". So, it's only a speck of light
every
Post by Stormin Mormon
however many seconds. Giving the cells plenty of time to relax between
slow
Post by Stormin Mormon
flashes. Now, it makes more sense.
Still, "high" would presumably be all three LED going full time. Makes me
wonder if there is a module so they aren't on full time, but rapid flash?
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
http://www.lds.org/portal/site/LDSOrg
http://www.mormon.org/mormonorg/eng/
.
: > Oops, that's 160 hours on low, 110 on medium, 50 on high. 200 hours
on
Post by Stormin Mormon
: > slow
: > flash.
: > http://www.ptsportlights.com/products/index.php?id=3&type=1&use=0
: >
: >Just remembered about the test and removed the headlamp from the bottom
of
: >my backpack. It's just about 145 hours later and the light is still
usable
: >enough to see what is under my desk without any problem, I would have
no
Post by Stormin Mormon
: >trouble finding anything that I might have dropped. Reading a book at
arms
: >length is also possible, although realistically I read my books from a
: >little bit closer. My guess is that it will make it to 160 hours as
: >advertised.
: >
: From "AAA" cells as I use on my TV remote control? Or even "AA"
: cells? 160 hours??? :-)
: Not that necessarily disbelieve you, perhaps you can see in the
: dark. Or your vision is phenomenally sensitive. Or you know
: something that the rest of us don't about sources of light.
: Please elucidate!
: If your vision is good enough to get 160 hours of "usable" light
: out of "AAA" cells in series or parallel, am sure that others in
: this group want to know your secret!
: As to vision, if you are correct, it would almost be enough to
: convince me that extraterrestrials are indeed among us!
: Either you, "Jerry", have extremely acute vision or have some
: "AAA" cells beyond our current technology!
: Um, but if you have such acute vision, why bother with an
: artificial source of light at all? Plenty of light from stars in
: the night sky, let alone the reflected light from the moon.
: And if you have such superior technology as to produce such high
: output and long life output from conventional "AAA" cells, or
: have such an extremely efficient light source from their rather
: limited output, just why are you wasting your time posting on
: this, or any, group?
: I'm certain that manufacturers of chemical cells or light sources
: would be happy to have you on their research team...or leading
: it?!
: ------
Now about 23 hours later, so that would make 168 hours. Light appears as
bright as yesterday. Found a dime and the USB connector for my Ipod shuffle
under my desk in a totally dark room. Can read a paperback book with no
problem. Can change a set of batteries in my camera and distinguish between
what is plugged into which electrical outlet easily. Batteries are regular
Walgreen's super alkaline AAA's. I'm surprised that they lasted past the 160
hours, the light still looks as bright as yesterday, unscientifically, but
it works for me.
A word about the flash, it's not just a speck. It's a bright flash that
could be spotted from a distance. If used only at night, it would work well
as a beacon for anyone searching for you at night.
The price of this headlamp has dropped almost 10 bucks since I bought mine,
I have a few, one for each family member. We get good use on campouts or
just reading at night. I might buy some more at this new price.
It has 3 steady settings, high, medium and low, plus two flash settings,
fast and slow.
I would recommend highly. You will be surprised. My test was on low, steady
light. I'll bet it goes to 175 hours no problem. My batteries were fresh.
It's coming up on 191 hours if my math is right. 8 straight days of
continuous light, although dimmer than when I started out with fresh
batteries. The light looks just as bright as yesterday. Can still read and
walk around in a dark room and perform low light types of activities. I'm
guessing that it will be lights out in the morning, but as far as I'm
concerned, this light has met or exceeded the limits it claims. I'm guessing
that tomorrow will be my last report.
Stormin Mormon
2007-09-21 11:38:34 UTC
Permalink
Is that light on steady, or is it flashing?
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
http://www.lds.org/portal/site/LDSOrg
http://www.mormon.org/mormonorg/eng/
.
"Jerry" <***@127.0.0.1> wrote in message news:***@comcast.com...
: It's coming up on 191 hours if my math is right. 8 straight days of
: continuous light, although dimmer than when I started out with fresh
: batteries. The light looks just as bright as yesterday. Can still read and
: walk around in a dark room and perform low light types of activities. I'm
: guessing that it will be lights out in the morning, but as far as I'm
: concerned, this light has met or exceeded the limits it claims. I'm
guessing
: that tomorrow will be my last report.
:
:
Jerry
2007-09-22 02:09:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stormin Mormon
Is that light on steady, or is it flashing?
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
http://www.lds.org/portal/site/LDSOrg
http://www.mormon.org/mormonorg/eng/
.
: It's coming up on 191 hours if my math is right. 8 straight days of
: continuous light, although dimmer than when I started out with fresh
: batteries. The light looks just as bright as yesterday. Can still read and
: walk around in a dark room and perform low light types of activities. I'm
: guessing that it will be lights out in the morning, but as far as I'm
: concerned, this light has met or exceeded the limits it claims. I'm
guessing
: that tomorrow will be my last report.
The lamp has 3 steady settings- low, medium, high. Two blinking settings,
fast and slow. My testing was STEADY and LOW.

Click on BEAM SETTINGS to see the quoted ratings:
http://www.ptsportlights.com/products/index.php?id=3&type=1&use=0

Looking closer at the advertisement, it claims 160 hours at a little over 5m
on the LOW settings. I did not check the 5m distance, but that's probably
right for that time period, it seemed bright enough. Towards the end it was
decreasing in brightness, so the distance would be less.

This morning the light was still on and I meant to put it back in my
backpack so that I could watch it at work. I must have forgotten it at home,
and looked for it when I returned home. My wife said she had found it on,
and put it away. She was unaware of my test. She told me that she turned it
off at about 2 PM. I guess I could just subtract the time that is was off
and continue my test, but maybe I'll just try again with a more scientific
approach in the future. It still works, I just tried it and is still bright
enough to be able to read with.

There were some comments about what would be considered usable. I guess that
would matter what you would want to do with the light, I guess. If I'm safe
and warm, my lighting requirements would be low, providing I could wait
until daylight. I would turn it off before sleeping, I don't require a
nightlight.

It's certainly usable for reading. Beyond that, when it couldn't be usable
for reading any longer, I suppose it would be usable for morale. I think I
would certainly find even a pinprick of light useful in a survival
situation, such as a cave-in for example, if only to keep hope from sinking.

I would recommend this light, it's small and lightweight and lasts a long
time. I have no interest in the company, other than buying and using their
stuff. It was originally recommended to me, I think it was a good
recommendation. I understand the PETZL TIKA is a similar product. It was
also recommended, but I chose the Princeton Tec Aurora. I can't remember
why, it may have been price. I bought mine at REI because of their return
policy, although I found no need to return it. This one is over two years
old and works as well as when I bought it.
Jerry
2007-09-22 02:22:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry
Post by Stormin Mormon
Is that light on steady, or is it flashing?
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
http://www.lds.org/portal/site/LDSOrg
http://www.mormon.org/mormonorg/eng/
.
: It's coming up on 191 hours if my math is right. 8 straight days of
: continuous light, although dimmer than when I started out with fresh
: batteries. The light looks just as bright as yesterday. Can still read
and
Post by Stormin Mormon
: walk around in a dark room and perform low light types of activities.
I'm
Post by Stormin Mormon
: guessing that it will be lights out in the morning, but as far as I'm
: concerned, this light has met or exceeded the limits it claims. I'm
guessing
: that tomorrow will be my last report.
The lamp has 3 steady settings- low, medium, high. Two blinking settings,
fast and slow. My testing was STEADY and LOW.
http://www.ptsportlights.com/products/index.php?id=3&type=1&use=0
Looking closer at the advertisement, it claims 160 hours at a little over 5m
on the LOW settings. I did not check the 5m distance, but that's probably
right for that time period, it seemed bright enough. Towards the end it was
decreasing in brightness, so the distance would be less.
This morning the light was still on and I meant to put it back in my
backpack so that I could watch it at work. I must have forgotten it at home,
and looked for it when I returned home. My wife said she had found it on,
and put it away. She was unaware of my test. She told me that she turned it
off at about 2 PM. I guess I could just subtract the time that is was off
and continue my test, but maybe I'll just try again with a more scientific
approach in the future. It still works, I just tried it and is still bright
enough to be able to read with.
There were some comments about what would be considered usable. I guess that
would matter what you would want to do with the light, I guess. If I'm safe
and warm, my lighting requirements would be low, providing I could wait
until daylight. I would turn it off before sleeping, I don't require a
nightlight.
It's certainly usable for reading. Beyond that, when it couldn't be usable
for reading any longer, I suppose it would be usable for morale. I think I
would certainly find even a pinprick of light useful in a survival
situation, such as a cave-in for example, if only to keep hope from sinking.
I would recommend this light, it's small and lightweight and lasts a long
time. I have no interest in the company, other than buying and using their
stuff. It was originally recommended to me, I think it was a good
recommendation. I understand the PETZL TIKA is a similar product. It was
also recommended, but I chose the Princeton Tec Aurora. I can't remember
why, it may have been price. I bought mine at REI because of their return
policy, although I found no need to return it. This one is over two years
old and works as well as when I bought it.
LOL, just thought about your question..it would be difficult to read if it
was on blink mode :)
Jerry
2007-10-06 02:06:51 UTC
Permalink
This is a great deal.

http://www.sportsauthority.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2530641&cp=970096.1346900&parentPage=family
Stormin Mormon (on backup computer)
2007-10-06 12:46:24 UTC
Permalink
So, how does that help me decide if I've got enough light sources?
--
Christopher A. Young
.
.

"Jerry" <***@127.0.0.1> wrote in message news:***@comcast.com...
This is a great deal.

http://www.sportsauthority.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2530641&cp=970096.1346900&parentPage=family
Myal
2007-10-06 12:56:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stormin Mormon (on backup computer)
So, how does that help me decide if I've got enough light sources?
can you see?
if no , get more light sources
if yes , you have enough allready for the moment

Jim
2007-09-10 03:59:45 UTC
Permalink
19th century oil lamps, the ones with glass chimneys and flat wicks,
are simple, fairly bright, and efficient. Keep the wicks low so that
you don't waste fuel and turn your chimney opaque by producing lamp
black. Flat wicks actually burn cleaner and brighter than the earlier
round wicks since they present greater surface area to the air. The
chimney also creates a draft which sucks in more oxygen. If you build
wall sconces for candles or oil lamps, buy a couple flat mirrors to
mount on the wall behind them. In this way some of the light which
would otherwise be absorbed by the wall will instead be reflected back
into the room. 18th and 19th century sconces sometimes had polished
pewter or brass mirrors. Oil lamps will also burn vegetable oil if
you run out of petroleum. Warning! Burning vegetable oil indoors
will make your house smell like french fries which can make you
hungry.
Jim Koch, Cleveland
Stormin Mormon
2007-09-10 13:11:03 UTC
Permalink
In the 1970s, they used to sell something called an "uncandle". Small
plastic float, you could put in a wick, and use it to burn cooking oil, and
it would burn some what like a candle. People have been burning cooking oil
for light, for many generations. I'd not thought of the food smell, though.
I used to use cooking oil for helping light camp fires. Poured onto pine
needles, or paper towels. Hard to light, but burns with a very slow fire.

Mineral oil "baby oil" also burns. Warning! Keep baby's bottom away from
open flame.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
http://www.lds.org/portal/site/LDSOrg
http://www.mormon.org/mormonorg/eng/
.
"Jim" <***@en.com> wrote in message news:***@r34g2000hsd.googlegroups.com...
: 19th century oil lamps, the ones with glass chimneys and flat wicks,
: are simple, fairly bright, and efficient. Keep the wicks low so that
: you don't waste fuel and turn your chimney opaque by producing lamp
: black. Flat wicks actually burn cleaner and brighter than the earlier
: round wicks since they present greater surface area to the air. The
: chimney also creates a draft which sucks in more oxygen. If you build
: wall sconces for candles or oil lamps, buy a couple flat mirrors to
: mount on the wall behind them. In this way some of the light which
: would otherwise be absorbed by the wall will instead be reflected back
: into the room. 18th and 19th century sconces sometimes had polished
: pewter or brass mirrors. Oil lamps will also burn vegetable oil if
: you run out of petroleum. Warning! Burning vegetable oil indoors
: will make your house smell like french fries which can make you
: hungry.
: >
: Jim Koch, Cleveland
:
Retief
2007-09-10 04:41:19 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 9 Sep 2007 21:06:04 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"
Post by Stormin Mormon
I spent money this week to buy some more camping gear to help work on my bug
out bag. I'm trying to make a fanny
pack for times away from the truck, but not enough away to grab my backpack.
I did find an oil lamp at the second hand shop, now I have two table top oil
lamps. This one, I'm not sure how much oil it holds. Likely about a quart.
I'm confused... You aren't carrying all this in your bugout bag, are
you? I bought a 3W LED flashlight, that uses 3AAA batteries. I carry
a lower power LED light (which also uses 3AAAs) for the majority of
the time when I don't need blinding light... A couple extra sets of
batteries, and I probably have enough flashlight to last a month or so
of continuous runtime...
Post by Stormin Mormon
It's got a glass base, and glass chimney. Walmart has three wicks for 97
cents, great price. My new lamp needed a wick. I have a couple bottles of
Ultra Pure lamp oil, but considering buying a couple more. I'm not sure how
Ultra pure will burn cleaner, but it is a kerosene lamp, right? Cheap
kerosene will smoke more and stink more, but will work (how many
gallons do you want to store?).

Of course, for centuries people have relied on various types of oil
lamps (basically a dish with a wick cloth sticking out of one end --
put whatever oil or fat you have into the dish and light it).

Or you could get some of the floating wicks, which people use for
"atmosphere lighting" at special events. You float the metal boat
holding the wick, on top of your fat or oil in a glass (often on
water, at those "special events").
Post by Stormin Mormon
In March I used my propane lantern for a friend who had his power turned
off. Two mantles run about eight hours on a pound of propane (wide open, max
I save my propane for cooking.
Post by Stormin Mormon
I've got a candle melting kit, I can melt paraffin wax, or other candles,
and pour them into molds. Dollar Tree has 18 candles for a buck, I can put
Fat candles. Beef, deer, other animal fats. Purify them first, to
make them stink less.
Post by Stormin Mormon
I'm doing OK for both flash lights and batteries. Well, at least I think I'm
OK. As I've heard from people in hurricane zones,
Stash of NiMHs and a method to recharge them without line power (e.g.
solar, 12V adapter for generators or car, hand crank, ...)
Post by Stormin Mormon
I've got some 6 volt lantern batteries, and some D cells. But how many is
Depends on what you're driving with them. LEDs draw very little
power. What's the capacity of the 6 V latern batteries? I'd guess it
might be in the range of 20-25 AH (possibly higher than that, if used
at a low current draw). If you were driving a standard single LED
(about 20 mA) with that, it should run a good 1,000 hours.

Retief
Stormin Mormon
2007-09-10 13:36:42 UTC
Permalink
: >I spent money this week to buy some more camping gear to help work on my
bug
: >out bag. I'm trying to make a fanny
: >pack for times away from the truck, but not enough away to grab my
backpack.
: >
: >I did find an oil lamp at the second hand shop, now I have two table top
oil
: >lamps. This one, I'm not sure how much oil it holds. Likely about a
quart.
:
: I'm confused... You aren't carrying all this in your bugout bag, are
: you?

CY: My mistake, sorry. Doing two things at once. Making a fanny pack, and
also considering light sources for around the house.

I bought a 3W LED flashlight, that uses 3AAA batteries. I carry
: a lower power LED light (which also uses 3AAAs) for the majority of
: the time when I don't need blinding light... A couple extra sets of
: batteries, and I probably have enough flashlight to last a month or so
: of continuous runtime...

CY: While I do have some AAA lights, I don't use them very much. The AAA
batteries don't have very much power in them. Dorcy has a single AAA flash
light that amazed me. I got one in the camping section at Walmart. runs
about three hours on a single AAA cell. I had bought a couple lights on Ebay
that take one AA cell and have 12 LED. Runs about three hours on a single
battery. The Dorcy is about the same brightness.

http://www.buyhardwaresupplies.com/?t=5&m=g1&itemNumber=3205291

:
: >It's got a glass base, and glass chimney. Walmart has three wicks for 97
: >cents, great price. My new lamp needed a wick. I have a couple bottles of
: >Ultra Pure lamp oil, but considering buying a couple more. I'm not sure
how
:
: Ultra pure will burn cleaner, but it is a kerosene lamp, right? Cheap
: kerosene will smoke more and stink more, but will work (how many
: gallons do you want to store?).

CY: Odd you should mention that. I do have some kerosene for my heater. The
ultra pure is six or seven bucks a gallon, and kerosene is about three. For
a couple days of power cut, it's worth it to me to have less stink. I'm wond
ering if it's OK to leave lamp oil in the lamp. Then, the wick would be wet
and ready to light. Or does the lamp oil evaporate too quickly and stink up
the house?

:
: Of course, for centuries people have relied on various types of oil
: lamps (basically a dish with a wick cloth sticking out of one end --
: put whatever oil or fat you have into the dish and light it).

CY: I read about a couple guys caught in a hotel power blackout. They made
an oil lamp out of the ashtray in their room. Clever.

:
: Or you could get some of the floating wicks, which people use for
: "atmosphere lighting" at special events. You float the metal boat
: holding the wick, on top of your fat or oil in a glass (often on
: water, at those "special events").
CY: The Uncandle thing from the 1970's.

:
: >In March I used my propane lantern for a friend who had his power turned
: >off. Two mantles run about eight hours on a pound of propane (wide open,
max
:
: I save my propane for cooking.
CY: That's a good idea.

:
: >I've got a candle melting kit, I can melt paraffin wax, or other candles,
: >and pour them into molds. Dollar Tree has 18 candles for a buck, I can
put
:
: Fat candles. Beef, deer, other animal fats. Purify them first, to
: make them stink less.
:
: >I'm doing OK for both flash lights and batteries. Well, at least I think
I'm
: >OK. As I've heard from people in hurricane zones,
:
: Stash of NiMHs and a method to recharge them without line power (e.g.
: solar, 12V adapter for generators or car, hand crank, ...)

CY: I do have one of those table top chargers that does all the cells
including GUM cells, whatever those are. Twenty bucks from Emergency
Essentials.

:
: >I've got some 6 volt lantern batteries, and some D cells. But how many is
:
: Depends on what you're driving with them. LEDs draw very little
: power. What's the capacity of the 6 V latern batteries? I'd guess it
: might be in the range of 20-25 AH (possibly higher than that, if used
: at a low current draw). If you were driving a standard single LED
: (about 20 mA) with that, it should run a good 1,000 hours.

CY: I'd have to look it up. But Energizer and Duracell used to have a tech
sheet hidden on their web site. http://data.energizer.com/SearchResult.aspx
probably won't give you the same page as I got, but it's on the web site
some where.
:
: Retief
Retief
2007-09-11 03:18:04 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 10 Sep 2007 09:36:42 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"
Post by Stormin Mormon
: I'm confused... You aren't carrying all this in your bugout bag, are
: you?
CY: My mistake, sorry. Doing two things at once. Making a fanny pack, and
also considering light sources for around the house.
My AAA NiMH are about 1000 mAH capacity. If I pull 20 mA, I should be
able to comfortably run them all night for a couple nights (and
probably much more, as the power consumption for an LED goes down
non-linearly with voltage).
Post by Stormin Mormon
I bought a 3W LED flashlight, that uses 3AAA batteries. I carry
: a lower power LED light (which also uses 3AAAs) for the majority of
: the time when I don't need blinding light... A couple extra sets of
: batteries, and I probably have enough flashlight to last a month or so
: of continuous runtime...
CY: While I do have some AAA lights, I don't use them very much. The AAA
batteries don't have very much power in them. Dorcy has a single AAA flash
I also bought a 2-AA mini-Maglite 3W LED (3-AA would be better, as it
wouldn't require a voltage boost circuit to get the required LED
voltage -- but I wanted to keep the physical size of the light down).
I have replaced my D-cell Maglite bulbs with 3W LEDs (it may be less
power, but even if they use the same power they are vastly brighter
and more usable).

But I still mostly use my single white Rayovac LED flashlight (which
uses 3 AAAs).
Post by Stormin Mormon
light that amazed me. I got one in the camping section at Walmart. runs
about three hours on a single AAA cell. I had bought a couple lights on Ebay
that take one AA cell and have 12 LED. Runs about three hours on a single
battery. The Dorcy is about the same brightness.
Those single battery units are (relative) power hogs, as they need to
boost the LED voltage -- thus you suffer conversion losses.

I carry them for convenience and size (not as a primary use light --
rather to guide me to my primary use light, if I'm seperated from it)
Post by Stormin Mormon
a couple days of power cut, it's worth it to me to have less stink. I'm wond
ering if it's OK to leave lamp oil in the lamp. Then, the wick would be wet
and ready to light. Or does the lamp oil evaporate too quickly and stink up
the house?
I would guess that it would evaporate and stink. Keep it sealed,
unless you're actively using it.
Post by Stormin Mormon
: Stash of NiMHs and a method to recharge them without line power (e.g.
: solar, 12V adapter for generators or car, hand crank, ...)
CY: I do have one of those table top chargers that does all the cells
including GUM cells, whatever those are. Twenty bucks from Emergency
Essentials.
The NiMHs require some sort of smart charger for best battery life.
But you can easily get these chargers to operate on 12V systems (i.e.
cigarette lighter plugs). A little cut and paste wiring, and you
could probably power it off one of these:

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=44768

Without detailed specs, we can guess that it probably puts out 15-17 V
peak. 1.5 Watts would be better than 1/2 Amp usable (you might want a
voltage regulator, to avoid toasting your charger's computer control
-- not sure how much voltage they can take).

Or, go a bit bigger with one of these:

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=41144

Or get a much bigger system, and charge a 12 V battery (or a few
batteries):

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=90599

3A would do a nice job of keeping a 12V car battery topped off, and
you could run the NiMH cell charger off that battery.
Post by Stormin Mormon
: Depends on what you're driving with them. LEDs draw very little
: power. What's the capacity of the 6 V latern batteries? I'd guess it
: might be in the range of 20-25 AH (possibly higher than that, if used
: at a low current draw). If you were driving a standard single LED
: (about 20 mA) with that, it should run a good 1,000 hours.
CY: I'd have to look it up. But Energizer and Duracell used to have a tech
sheet hidden on their web site. http://data.energizer.com/SearchResult.aspx
probably won't give you the same page as I got, but it's on the web site
some where.
Duracell still has one:

http://www.duracell.com/oem/productdata/default.asp

Those square 6V cells are built of 4 D-cell diameter batteries. Of
course, those cells are also 1.5 to 2 times the length of a D-cell
(and thus have about 1.5 to 2 times the capacity).

If you check the D-Cell (MN1300), you'll notice that it has in the
range of 15 AH of capacity at low current drain (or about 80-90 hours
service life, at 250 mA drain). You need about 1/10 that current to
power a (standard) single white LED, or you could guess about 10 times
the life of the example above (and then another factor of 2 by going
to the 6V cell).

Retief
Bart Bailey
2007-09-10 07:19:36 UTC
Permalink
In Message-ID:<46e49ba5$0$6441$***@roadrunner.com> posted on Sun, 9
Sep 2007 21:06:04 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote: Begin
Post by Stormin Mormon
I spent money this week to buy some more camping gear to help work on my bug
out bag. I'm trying to make a fanny
pack for times away from the truck, but not enough away to grab my backpack.
I did find an oil lamp at the second hand shop, now I have two table top oil
lamps. This one, I'm not sure how much oil it holds. Likely about a quart.
It's got a glass base, and glass chimney. Walmart has three wicks for 97
cents, great price. My new lamp needed a wick. I have a couple bottles of
Ultra Pure lamp oil, but considering buying a couple more. I'm not sure how
long a quart or pint or whatever will last. Of course, depends how high you
turn the flame. Anyone out there give me some pointers?
<~~~>
Post by Stormin Mormon
How do you know when you have enough? I'm sure I'll make it through the next
two or three day power cut with plenty of light sources.
I'd guess you might already have enough
when you start planning to keep an oil lantern in your fanny pack.
--
Bart
Stormin Mormon
2007-09-10 13:37:33 UTC
Permalink
I surely did make a big mess out of that post. Sorry. Hope it was good for
some smiles at my expense.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
http://www.lds.org/portal/site/LDSOrg
http://www.mormon.org/mormonorg/eng/
.
"Bart Bailey" <***@privacy.net> wrote in message news:***@bart.spawar.mil...
: In Message-ID:<46e49ba5$0$6441$***@roadrunner.com> posted on Sun, 9
: <~~~>
:
: >How do you know when you have enough? I'm sure I'll make it through the
next
: >two or three day power cut with plenty of light sources.
:
: I'd guess you might already have enough
: when you start planning to keep an oil lantern in your fanny pack.
:
: --
:
: Bart
Gunner
2007-09-10 08:10:12 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 9 Sep 2007 21:06:04 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"
Post by Stormin Mormon
And there are my supply of candles, which are light but not much heat.
If you sit on something, inside a standard issue poncho, with a single
plumbers candle between your feet, with Most of the poncho on the
ground..it will keep you warm in nearly zero degree temps, assuming
you are in a sheltered area. Be sure to let a little fresh air in at
the bottom, else the candle will go out due to depleting the O2.

Just be sure to not set yourself, or the poncho on fire...don't go to
sleep.

Gunner
Retief
2007-09-11 03:18:04 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 10 Sep 2007 01:10:12 -0700, Gunner
Post by Gunner
Post by Stormin Mormon
And there are my supply of candles, which are light but not much heat.
If you sit on something, inside a standard issue poncho, with a single
plumbers candle between your feet, with Most of the poncho on the
ground..it will keep you warm in nearly zero degree temps, assuming
you are in a sheltered area. Be sure to let a little fresh air in at
the bottom, else the candle will go out due to depleting the O2.
I'd heard the same trick using a space blanket (which is better at
reflecting the radiant energy back onto you).

Retief
Stormin Mormon
2007-09-11 12:51:07 UTC
Permalink
I've not tried this, but I've heard it called a "palmer furnace". Excellent
reminder for folks, of a very useful technique.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
http://www.lds.org/portal/site/LDSOrg
http://www.mormon.org/mormonorg/eng/
.
"Gunner" <***@NOSPAM.lightspeed.net> wrote in message news:***@4ax.com...
: On Sun, 9 Sep 2007 21:06:04 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"
: <cayoung61##spamblock$$@hotmail.com> wrote:
:
: >And there are my supply of candles, which are light but not much heat.
:
: If you sit on something, inside a standard issue poncho, with a single
: plumbers candle between your feet, with Most of the poncho on the
: ground..it will keep you warm in nearly zero degree temps, assuming
: you are in a sheltered area. Be sure to let a little fresh air in at
: the bottom, else the candle will go out due to depleting the O2.
:
: Just be sure to not set yourself, or the poncho on fire...don't go to
: sleep.
:
: Gunner
Ginny
2007-09-10 09:01:31 UTC
Permalink
Stormin Mormon wrote:
<snip>
Post by Stormin Mormon
How do you know when you have enough? I'm sure I'll make it through the next
two or three day power cut with plenty of light sources.
Are solar garden lights available over there? Here they are very cheap
at present although better quality ones are more pricey. They do make a
good inside light for when the power is out though. I bought a couple
for the garden and we used them in a vase inside, one on the kitchen
table, one in the bathroom and one to cart around the house. They have a
small on/off switch under the rim unlike the first ones I bought years
ago which had to be dismantled to turn off. Less dangerous than a candle
and quite bright with the LED light and defuser.
--
Ginny - in West Australia

Plan ahead ... It wasn't raining when Noah built the ark. -- Unknown
Stormin Mormon
2007-09-10 13:47:41 UTC
Permalink
Yes, I'm sure I've seen them advertised. Very good idea -- self contained
and portable.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
http://www.lds.org/portal/site/LDSOrg
http://www.mormon.org/mormonorg/eng/
.
"Ginny" <***@REMOVETHISyahoo.co.uk> wrote in message news:***@corp.supernews.com...
: Are solar garden lights available over there? Here they are very cheap
: at present although better quality ones are more pricey. They do make a
: good inside light for when the power is out though. I bought a couple
: for the garden and we used them in a vase inside, one on the kitchen
: table, one in the bathroom and one to cart around the house. They have a
: small on/off switch under the rim unlike the first ones I bought years
: ago which had to be dismantled to turn off. Less dangerous than a candle
: and quite bright with the LED light and defuser.
:
: --
: Ginny - in West Australia
:
: Plan ahead ... It wasn't raining when Noah built the ark. -- Unknown
Ginny
2007-09-11 00:57:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stormin Mormon
Yes, I'm sure I've seen them advertised. Very good idea -- self contained
and portable.
I can't read by them but cooking and bathing are okay. They just stop me
from stumbling around in the full dark or spilling candle wax on the
carpet. I tend to keep at least one turned off all the time so there is
one fully charged in the sun every day.
--
Ginny - in West Australia

Plan ahead ... It wasn't raining when Noah built the ark. -- Unknown
Stormin Mormon
2007-09-11 04:07:00 UTC
Permalink
For whatever reason, my server didn't want to download a couple messages. I
had to go to Google Groups and ge them, so what's below may look a bit
confused.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
http://www.lds.org/portal/site/LDSOrg
http://www.mormon.org/mormonorg/eng/

CY: I'd have to look it up. But Energizer and Duracell used to have a tech
sheet hidden on their web site. http://data.energizer.com/SearchResult.aspx
probably won't give you the same page as I got, but it's on the web site
some where.


:




Newsgroups: alt.survival, misc.survivalism
From: Ginny ***@REMOVETHISyahoo.co.uk




I can't read by them but cooking and bathing are okay. They just stop me
from stumbling around in the full dark or spilling candle wax on the
carpet. I tend to keep at least one turned off all the time so there is
one fully charged in the sun every day.
--
Ginny - in West Australia


CY: That does sound totally useful. Maybe I'll buy a couple of them and try
them?

Plan ahead ... It wasn't raining when Noah built the ark. -- Unknown


Retief View profile
Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2007 22:18:04 -0500
Post by Stormin Mormon
First, 150 hours from a set of AAA batteries sounds a bit much. That's six
My Rayovac LED flashlight claims "up to 200 hours" (on 3 AAAs). Yes,
it will get dim, but still usuable light (once your eyes adjust to the
dark, even a little light is "quite a bit"...).

I use it a few minutes every day, and change the batteries about once
per year (just because I decide it's time, not generally because it's
showing substantial dimming).

CY: Yep, the pre emptive change out is a good idea. Don't want ot be on your
last hour of light when you go camping.

But we can do the math on the LED current drain:

http://www.duracell.com/oem/productdata/default.asp

The first graph on the AAA (MN1500) data page shows a 90 hour service
life, for 1V and 43 ohms (i.e. that's 23 mA at that point). Your
single LED is going to have substantially lower specs than that,
typically 20 mA at desired operating voltage (probably 4+ volts for a
white LED), and they exhibit a much lower current as the voltage
drops. Assuming 3 AAA in series, you are down to 3 volts at 90 hour,
you may be only pushing 5-10 mA.

Going to the next graph, service hours vs. current drain, you read
service life off. At 20 mA, you could expect between 100 and 200
hours.
Post by Stormin Mormon
days, after all. Have you actually tried leaving it on and see how long it
really lasts? I've bought a light on Ebay that claimed 30 hours, and
Regarding those little 1-AAA flashlights that you mentioned, I found
that mine will run 4-6 hours at reasonable brightness, and then will
trickle along (enough to read a map at close distance) for another 4-5
days...

CY: Might be different model. Dorcy I've heard made a couple versions. I saw
one near the checkouts for two bucks, one AAA and a filament bulb. I'll buy
one next time, see if it works. Be good for a camping kit that seldom gets
used.
Post by Stormin Mormon
Headlamps are incredibly handy because they put light usually where you
need
Post by Stormin Mormon
it. And leaving both hands available for the work. I tried my head lamp
while doing a night time picnic recently, it's very useful.
Of course, that also puts a target right on your forehead (if things
get rough, and people started shooting at lights)...

CY:So true, and I'd not thought of that.

My AAA NiMH are about 1000 mAH capacity. If I pull 20 mA, I should be
able to comfortably run them all night for a couple nights (and
probably much more, as the power consumption for an LED goes down
non-linearly with voltage).

CY: You know, I think I got some AAA nimmies, I was running head lamps on
them for a while. Can't remember what I did with those.



I also bought a 2-AA mini-Maglite 3W LED (3-AA would be better, as it
wouldn't require a voltage boost circuit to get the required LED
voltage -- but I wanted to keep the physical size of the light down).

CY: I looked at t hat, but it was longer than the regular mini mag. I'll
stay with the luxeon conversion for now.


I have replaced my D-cell Maglite bulbs with 3W LEDs (it may be less
power, but even if they use the same power they are vastly brighter
and more usable).

CY: My D mags don't get used enough to warrant a $20 bulb. The Krypton 750
mA bulbs work fine. I actually very seldom use D mags.


But I still mostly use my single white Rayovac LED flashlight (which
uses 3 AAAs).

cY: My work horse is my 2aa mini mag witht he Luxeon conversion.
Post by Stormin Mormon
light that amazed me. I got one in the camping section at Walmart. runs
about three hours on a single AAA cell. I had bought a couple lights on
Ebay
Post by Stormin Mormon
that take one AA cell and have 12 LED. Runs about three hours on a single
battery. The Dorcy is about the same brightness.
Those single battery units are (relative) power hogs, as they need to
boost the LED voltage -- thus you suffer conversion losses.

I carry them for convenience and size (not as a primary use light --
rather to guide me to my primary use light, if I'm seperated from it)

CY: Right. The single AAA works for a couple hours.
Post by Stormin Mormon
a couple days of power cut, it's worth it to me to have less stink. I'm
wond
Post by Stormin Mormon
ering if it's OK to leave lamp oil in the lamp. Then, the wick would be
wet
Post by Stormin Mormon
and ready to light. Or does the lamp oil evaporate too quickly and stink
up
Post by Stormin Mormon
the house?
I would guess that it would evaporate and stink. Keep it sealed,
unless you're actively using it.

CY: Oops. I just filled my oil lamp. What's really totally stinking is the
apple scent candles i just got.
Post by Stormin Mormon
: Stash of NiMHs and a method to recharge them without line power (e.g.
: solar, 12V adapter for generators or car, hand crank, ...)
CY: I do have one of those table top chargers that does all the cells
including GUM cells, whatever those are. Twenty bucks from Emergency
Essentials.
The NiMHs require some sort of smart charger for best battery life.
But you can easily get these chargers to operate on 12V systems (i.e.
cigarette lighter plugs). A little cut and paste wiring, and you
could probably power it off one of these:

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=44768

Without detailed specs, we can guess that it probably puts out 15-17 V
peak. 1.5 Watts would be better than 1/2 Amp usable (you might want a
voltage regulator, to avoid toasting your charger's computer control
-- not sure how much voltage they can take).

Or, go a bit bigger with one of these:

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=41144

Or get a much bigger system, and charge a 12 V battery (or a few
batteries):

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=90599

3A would do a nice job of keeping a 12V car battery topped off, and
you could run the NiMH cell charger off that battery.

CY: I do have a nimmie charger that has a lighter cord. I thik it was from
walmart, wish they still had them. But they now seem to have only 110 volt
chargers.
Post by Stormin Mormon
: Depends on what you're driving with them. LEDs draw very little
: power. What's the capacity of the 6 V latern batteries? I'd guess it
: might be in the range of 20-25 AH (possibly higher than that, if used
: at a low current draw). If you were driving a standard single LED
: (about 20 mA) with that, it should run a good 1,000 hours.
CY: I'd have to look it up. But Energizer and Duracell used to have a tech
sheet hidden on their web site.
http://data.energizer.com/SearchResult.aspx
Post by Stormin Mormon
probably won't give you the same page as I got, but it's on the web site
some where.
Duracell still has one:

http://www.duracell.com/oem/productdata/default.asp

CY: Thank you!

Those square 6V cells are built of 4 D-cell diameter batteries. Of
course, those cells are also 1.5 to 2 times the length of a D-cell
(and thus have about 1.5 to 2 times the capacity).

CY: There was a PDF file that made the rounds, someone pulled a couple
lantern batteries apart. Energizer uses F cells, but the others just use D
cells.

If you check the D-Cell (MN1300), you'll notice that it has in the
range of 15 AH of capacity at low current drain (or about 80-90 hours
service life, at 250 mA drain). You need about 1/10 that current to
power a (standard) single white LED, or you could guess about 10 times
the life of the example above (and then another factor of 2 by going
to the 6V cell).

Retief


From: "Jerry" <***@127.0.0.1>
Date: Mon, 10 Sep 2007 22:41:54 -0500
Post by Stormin Mormon
First, 150 hours from a set of AAA batteries sounds a bit much. That's six
days, after all. Have you actually tried leaving it on and see how long it
really lasts?
Oops, that's 160 hours on low, 110 on medium, 50 on high. 200 hours on slow
flash.
http://www.ptsportlights.com/products/index.php?id=3&type=1&use=0

CY: Neat stuff, if they really last that long.

No, I haven't left it on for that long, but I do use it a lot and the
batteries to seem to last forever. The amount of light does decrease as time
goes by, but still enough to keep you from walking off a cliff. I will get
some fresh batteries tomorrow and see how long they last. I won't be able to
set up any fancy jig or graph the results, just the number of hours of
usable light.



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Too_Many_Tools
2007-09-11 04:06:43 UTC
Permalink
On Sep 9, 8:06 pm, "Stormin Mormon"
Post by Stormin Mormon
I spent money this week to buy some more camping gear to help work on my bug
out bag. I'm trying to make a fanny
pack for times away from the truck, but not enough away to grab my backpack.
I did find an oil lamp at the second hand shop, now I have two table top oil
lamps. This one, I'm not sure how much oil it holds. Likely about a quart.
It's got a glass base, and glass chimney. Walmart has three wicks for 97
cents, great price. My new lamp needed a wick. I have a couple bottles of
Ultra Pure lamp oil, but considering buying a couple more. I'm not sure how
long a quart or pint or whatever will last. Of course, depends how high you
turn the flame. Anyone out there give me some pointers?
In March I used my propane lantern for a friend who had his power turned
off. Two mantles run about eight hours on a pound of propane (wide open, max
brightness and heat setting). Gander Mountain sports has an adaptor. Short
brass adaptor allows you to run 16 ounce appliances on a 20 pound tank. With
the $10 right angle adaptor, I can run a lantern right off the gas grill
propane tank. With that plus the $17 hose, I could run a lantern near the
ceiling, or a camp stove on a table. Anyone out there used the bulk adpator,
or the adaptor plus hose? I've tried the refill gadget, but the small 16
ounce tanks usually leak.
And there are my supply of candles, which are light but not much heat. I've
got some plasic drinking glass I use for molds. The glass is about six
ounces. A candle made in that mold burns about three hours. I'm wondering if
I should buy some of the tall "pillar" candles. It looks like they would be
safer. Since there is so much glass around them, less likely to light a
fire. Build a wall holder? Just light a pillar candle in the bathroom, and
one in the living room.
I've got a candle melting kit, I can melt paraffin wax, or other candles,
and pour them into molds. Dollar Tree has 18 candles for a buck, I can put
one in the 6 ounce glass, and pour wax around it. That works nicely for
making candles that last a while.
I'm doing OK for both flash lights and batteries. Well, at least I think I'm
OK. As I've heard from people in hurricane zones,
cold light such as flash lights is much better than hot light like propane
or Coleman or kerosene burining light sources. When it's 95 and humid, you
really don't want to be burning propane.
I've got some 6 volt lantern batteries, and some D cells. But how many is
enough? Also have some AA and AAA cells. The AA cells I use in my mini mag,
and also in my pager. So, I do try to keep plenty of those. As for AAA, I
bought a couple from ebay, and still have a few.
I was in Walmart the other day. They have fluorescent lanterns for about
$20, which take four D cells. These look totally neat. I got at a garage
sale, a fluorescent lantern that runs on 12 volts. Eight D cells, which were
corroded. I ran that to a length of speaker wire, and a lighter plug, so now
i have a 12 volt lighter socket fluorescent lantern. Someday, I'll rig that
to two square lantern batteries, and it will then be portable.
The camping fluorescent lanterns sure look neat. I keep telling myself I've
got enough lanterns and stuff, but is there ever really enough? Sigh. so
many toys, so little money.
How do you know when you have enough? I'm sure I'll make it through the next
two or three day power cut with plenty of light sources.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
http://www.lds.org/portal/site/LDSOrg
http://www.mormon.org/mormonorg/eng/
.
I store your batteries outside of the flashlights.

I have had several flashlights ruined when the batteries leaked.

TMT
Stormin Mormon
2007-09-11 12:59:01 UTC
Permalink
Thanks for the reminder. I do have a couple lights stored with batteries.
Which could be stored separately. I do try to keep a couple lights with
batteries just in case, but other lights should be stored empty.

I find that either carbon cells or alkalines will leak. Carbon cells make a
brown corrosion that's really impossible to remove. Alkalines leak a liquid,
which is almost as bad.

Primary cells which have been recharged are far likely to leak. Recharged
Carbon cells don't hold enough power to be worth the bother of recharging.
Single use alkalines can be recharged if they weren't very discharged. A
charger called a Battery Manager Ultra can recharge primary use alkalines.
Got mine years ago, don't know if they are still available. I didn't find
any, using Google products search.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
http://www.lds.org/portal/site/LDSOrg
http://www.mormon.org/mormonorg/eng/
.
"Too_Many_Tools" <***@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:***@k79g2000hse.googlegroups.com...
:
: I store your batteries outside of the flashlights.
:
: I have had several flashlights ruined when the batteries leaked.
:
: TMT
:
Bart Bailey
2007-09-11 16:00:51 UTC
Permalink
In Message-ID:<46e692ac$1$18948$***@roadrunner.com> posted on Tue,
11 Sep 2007 08:59:01 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote: Begin
Post by Stormin Mormon
A
charger called a Battery Manager Ultra can recharge primary use alkalines.
Got mine years ago, don't know if they are still available. I didn't find
any, using Google products search.
Sounds like the defunct Battery Master CL-444 by Clearline Concepts.
Had two pair of charging bays separated by a storage well, was
switchable from NiCad to alkaline types. It was one of the first
individual cell smart chargers that took 'C', 'D', 'AA", and 'AAA" cells
and used red, yellow, or green annunciators.
I've got one of those up on a shelf, unused in almost ten years, since
replaced by NiMH (including Eneloops) capable gear and re-chargeable Li.
--
Bart
Stormin Mormon
2007-09-11 20:31:55 UTC
Permalink
I'm thinking we have two different devices. Mine has four charging bays,
four voltage displays, and a button to allow to change the display to how
much energy the device things the cell has (vertical bar graph).

Might you consider selling that charger to me?
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
http://www.lds.org/portal/site/LDSOrg
http://www.mormon.org/mormonorg/eng/
.
"Bart Bailey" <***@privacy.net> wrote in message news:***@bart.spawar.mil...
: In Message-ID:<46e692ac$1$18948$***@roadrunner.com> posted on Tue,
:
: Sounds like the defunct Battery Master CL-444 by Clearline Concepts.
: Had two pair of charging bays separated by a storage well, was
: switchable from NiCad to alkaline types. It was one of the first
: individual cell smart chargers that took 'C', 'D', 'AA", and 'AAA" cells
: and used red, yellow, or green annunciators.
: I've got one of those up on a shelf, unused in almost ten years, since
: replaced by NiMH (including Eneloops) capable gear and re-chargeable Li.
:
: --
:
: Bart
Bart Bailey
2007-09-11 20:58:33 UTC
Permalink
In Message-ID:<46e6fc14$0$17101$***@roadrunner.com> posted on Tue,
11 Sep 2007 16:31:55 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote: Begin
Post by Stormin Mormon
I'm thinking we have two different devices. Mine has four charging bays,
four voltage displays, and a button to allow to change the display to how
much energy the device things the cell has (vertical bar graph).
I seem to remember those too, had one of them once too, but the one I
have is different. It does have four bays and at the top of each are
LEDs; a red indicating bad cell or polarity, yellow indicating charging,
and a green indicating done. The one I had like you described suffered a
leaky cell that corroded the connection. I had intended to do a repair
or at least gut the electronics to use elsewhere but in the end it got
tossed. The CL-444 I have has a removable wall wart but I've seen some
with it hardwired and in my opinion inviting stress failure.
Post by Stormin Mormon
Might you consider selling that charger to me?
Sure, what's a fair price for something obsoleted by today's technology
yet too young to enjoy the Smithsonian factor?
...and you coming over to pick it up
or are we gonna have to pay someone to haul it over to your place?
--
Bart
Stormin Mormon
2007-09-11 22:19:08 UTC
Permalink
"Bart Bailey" <***@privacy.net> wrote in message news:***@bart.spawar.mil...
: In Message-ID:<46e6fc14$0$17101$***@roadrunner.com> posted on Tue,
: 11 Sep 2007 16:31:55 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote: Begin
:
: >I'm thinking we have two different devices. Mine has four charging bays,
: >four voltage displays, and a button to allow to change the display to how
: >much energy the device things the cell has (vertical bar graph).
:
: I seem to remember those too, had one of them once too, but the one I
: have is different. It does have four bays and at the top of each are
: LEDs; a red indicating bad cell or polarity, yellow indicating charging,
: and a green indicating done.

CY: Well, that sounds useful.

The one I had like you described suffered a
: leaky cell that corroded the connection. I had intended to do a repair
: or at least gut the electronics to use elsewhere but in the end it got
: tossed.

CY: Several times I've had to clean the contacts with water, paper towels,
cotton swabs, and Simple Green.

The CL-444 I have has a removable wall wart but I've seen some
: with it hardwired and in my opinion inviting stress failure.

CY: The BMU has a wall wart. Nine volts, which is a shame. If it were 12
volts, it coulda been mobile charger. What's the wall wart voltage? 12, I
hope?

:
: >Might you consider selling that charger to me?
:
: Sure, what's a fair price for something obsoleted by today's technology
: yet too young to enjoy the Smithsonian factor?
: ...and you coming over to pick it up
: or are we gonna have to pay someone to haul it over to your place?

CY: How's five bucks, you can drop it off after work tomorrow? Or you could
postal mail it.


:
: --
:
: Bart
Bart Bailey
2007-09-12 01:24:56 UTC
Permalink
In Message-ID:<46e71853$0$28840$***@roadrunner.com> posted on Tue,
11 Sep 2007 18:19:08 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote: Begin
Post by Stormin Mormon
What's the wall wart voltage? 12, I
hope?
Yep, standard 12v concentric plug
Post by Stormin Mormon
CY: How's five bucks, you can drop it off after work tomorrow?
I won't be going to work tomorrow,
I haven't worked per se since retirement,
some years ago.
--
Bart
Stormin Mormon
2007-09-12 02:06:41 UTC
Permalink
Shall we discuss change of plans, then?
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
http://www.lds.org/portal/site/LDSOrg
http://www.mormon.org/mormonorg/eng/
.
"Bart Bailey" <***@privacy.net> wrote in message news:***@bart.spawar.mil...
: In Message-ID:<46e71853$0$28840$***@roadrunner.com> posted on Tue,
: 11 Sep 2007 18:19:08 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote: Begin
:
: >What's the wall wart voltage? 12, I
: >hope?
:
: Yep, standard 12v concentric plug
:
: >CY: How's five bucks, you can drop it off after work tomorrow?
:
: I won't be going to work tomorrow,
: I haven't worked per se since retirement,
: some years ago.
:
: --
:
: Bart
Stormin Mormon
2007-09-12 02:06:41 UTC
Permalink
Shall we discuss change of plans, then?
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
http://www.lds.org/portal/site/LDSOrg
http://www.mormon.org/mormonorg/eng/
.
"Bart Bailey" <***@privacy.net> wrote in message news:***@bart.spawar.mil...
: In Message-ID:<46e71853$0$28840$***@roadrunner.com> posted on Tue,
: 11 Sep 2007 18:19:08 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote: Begin
:
: >What's the wall wart voltage? 12, I
: >hope?
:
: Yep, standard 12v concentric plug
:
: >CY: How's five bucks, you can drop it off after work tomorrow?
:
: I won't be going to work tomorrow,
: I haven't worked per se since retirement,
: some years ago.
:
: --
:
: Bart
aezael
2007-09-14 20:16:02 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 9 Sep 2007 21:06:04 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"
Post by Stormin Mormon
I spent money this week to buy some more camping gear to help work on my bug
out bag. I'm trying to make a fanny
pack for times away from the truck, but not enough away to grab my backpack.
I did find an oil lamp at the second hand shop, now I have two table top oil
lamps. This one, I'm not sure how much oil it holds. Likely about a quart.
It's got a glass base, and glass chimney. Walmart has three wicks for 97
cents, great price. My new lamp needed a wick. I have a couple bottles of
Ultra Pure lamp oil, but considering buying a couple more. I'm not sure how
long a quart or pint or whatever will last. Of course, depends how high you
turn the flame. Anyone out there give me some pointers?
In March I used my propane lantern for a friend who had his power turned
off. Two mantles run about eight hours on a pound of propane (wide open, max
brightness and heat setting). Gander Mountain sports has an adaptor. Short
brass adaptor allows you to run 16 ounce appliances on a 20 pound tank. With
the $10 right angle adaptor, I can run a lantern right off the gas grill
propane tank. With that plus the $17 hose, I could run a lantern near the
ceiling, or a camp stove on a table. Anyone out there used the bulk adpator,
or the adaptor plus hose? I've tried the refill gadget, but the small 16
ounce tanks usually leak.
And there are my supply of candles, which are light but not much heat. I've
got some plasic drinking glass I use for molds. The glass is about six
ounces. A candle made in that mold burns about three hours. I'm wondering if
I should buy some of the tall "pillar" candles. It looks like they would be
safer. Since there is so much glass around them, less likely to light a
fire. Build a wall holder? Just light a pillar candle in the bathroom, and
one in the living room.
I've got a candle melting kit, I can melt paraffin wax, or other candles,
and pour them into molds. Dollar Tree has 18 candles for a buck, I can put
one in the 6 ounce glass, and pour wax around it. That works nicely for
making candles that last a while.
I'm doing OK for both flash lights and batteries. Well, at least I think I'm
OK. As I've heard from people in hurricane zones,
cold light such as flash lights is much better than hot light like propane
or Coleman or kerosene burining light sources. When it's 95 and humid, you
really don't want to be burning propane.
I've got some 6 volt lantern batteries, and some D cells. But how many is
enough? Also have some AA and AAA cells. The AA cells I use in my mini mag,
and also in my pager. So, I do try to keep plenty of those. As for AAA, I
bought a couple from ebay, and still have a few.
I was in Walmart the other day. They have fluorescent lanterns for about
$20, which take four D cells. These look totally neat. I got at a garage
sale, a fluorescent lantern that runs on 12 volts. Eight D cells, which were
corroded. I ran that to a length of speaker wire, and a lighter plug, so now
i have a 12 volt lighter socket fluorescent lantern. Someday, I'll rig that
to two square lantern batteries, and it will then be portable.
The camping fluorescent lanterns sure look neat. I keep telling myself I've
got enough lanterns and stuff, but is there ever really enough? Sigh. so
many toys, so little money.
How do you know when you have enough? I'm sure I'll make it through the next
two or three day power cut with plenty of light sources.
How about a solar panel which provides 25 watts to charge a battery
and a few 25 watt 12 volt lamps available at most RV centers ?
Stormin Mormon
2007-09-15 11:04:23 UTC
Permalink
I'm not sure how much those cost, but probably more than a few more candles.
I like the concept of solar, as it lasts longer than a bottle of propane.
Batteries (lead acid, marine trolling) are only good for several years.
But, that's longer than most folks will have light and heat if the public
utility shuts down.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
http://www.lds.org/portal/site/LDSOrg
http://www.mormon.org/mormonorg/eng/
.
<aezael> wrote in message news:***@4ax.com...
: On Sun, 9 Sep 2007 21:06:04 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"
:
:
: How about a solar panel which provides 25 watts to charge a battery
: and a few 25 watt 12 volt lamps available at most RV centers ?
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