Discussion:
Heat output of oil / wick lamp?
(too old to reply)
Stormin Mormon
2010-10-23 02:16:30 UTC
Permalink
Wick type oil or "kerosene" lamps from Walmart or other places. They
put out some heat. But, how much?

Any idea how to figure out the BTU per hour? My thought is that they
burn about an ounce of oil an hour. More or less. So, on the web some
where has to be the heat content of lamp oil. Figure it out from
there.

If it's enough, then an oil lamp or two or more. Could be used for
heat when the power is off, or the propane tank is empty.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.
robert bowman
2010-10-23 05:49:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stormin Mormon
If it's enough, then an oil lamp or two or more. Could be used for
heat when the power is off, or the propane tank is empty.
Somewhat. I've used an Aladdin kerosene lamp in a 14' travel trailer, and it
did add a little warmth. If the outside temperature is below 40, expect to
dress warmly. Also even with the roof vent cracked and the normal air
leakage, I've had them start to get dim as the oxygen level dropped. That
probably wouldn't be a problem with a larger volume, but then the warming
would be negligible.
Thomas
2010-10-23 14:00:11 UTC
Permalink
I have 5 lamps, 7/8th inch wicks.

When the temp is 30 outside and I burn all 5, my temp rises about 1
degree an hour. This is a 20 by 25 ft room give or take with open
areas to other rooms.

Here's more...My automatic thermostat is set for 65 degrees 20 minutes
before I get home from work. By the time I'm there it is 65. I light
the lamps and increase 1 degree per hour or so and the furnace does
not kick on again.

My bathroom and bedrooms have the doors closed and they are frigid 7
hours later.
Stormin Mormon
2010-10-23 17:20:59 UTC
Permalink
How much lamp oil does that use? My lamps run "about" an ounce an
hour. Some earlier folks calculated an ounce of kerosene holds "about"
1,000 BTU of energy. Probably much the same for ultra pure.

Is (are) five lamps enough light to walk around, watch TV, etc? My
living room has three lamps. Two table top, and one on a wall bracket.

Thanks for the field report.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.


"Thomas" <***@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:037c82db-1c31-47cf-9147-***@n26g2000yqh.googlegroups.com...
I have 5 lamps, 7/8th inch wicks.

When the temp is 30 outside and I burn all 5, my temp rises about 1
degree an hour. This is a 20 by 25 ft room give or take with open
areas to other rooms.

Here's more...My automatic thermostat is set for 65 degrees 20 minutes
before I get home from work. By the time I'm there it is 65. I light
the lamps and increase 1 degree per hour or so and the furnace does
not kick on again.

My bathroom and bedrooms have the doors closed and they are frigid 7
hours later.
DogDiesel
2010-10-23 22:35:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stormin Mormon
How much lamp oil does that use? My lamps run "about" an ounce an
hour. Some earlier folks calculated an ounce of kerosene holds "about"
1,000 BTU of energy. Probably much the same for ultra pure.
Is (are) five lamps enough light to walk around, watch TV, etc? My
living room has three lamps. Two table top, and one on a wall bracket.
Thanks for the field report.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.
I have 5 lamps, 7/8th inch wicks.
When the temp is 30 outside and I burn all 5, my temp rises about 1
degree an hour. This is a 20 by 25 ft room give or take with open
areas to other rooms.
Here's more...My automatic thermostat is set for 65 degrees 20 minutes
before I get home from work. By the time I'm there it is 65. I light
the lamps and increase 1 degree per hour or so and the furnace does
not kick on again.
My bathroom and bedrooms have the doors closed and they are frigid 7
hours later.
This is interesting. I have a bunch of kero lamps as backups.
Stormin Mormon
2010-10-23 22:45:12 UTC
Permalink
Backups for what? What system, or ability is ready to be replaced?
And, do you have a bunch of kerosene, or ultra pure oil? How long is
your typical need for a backup? Figuring an ounce an hour per lamp, do
you have enough oil?
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.
Post by Thomas
I have 5 lamps, 7/8th inch wicks.
When the temp is 30 outside and I burn all 5, my temp rises about 1
degree an hour. This is a 20 by 25 ft room give or take with open
areas to other rooms.
This is interesting. I have a bunch of kero lamps as backups.
DogDiesel
2010-10-23 23:02:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stormin Mormon
Backups for what? What system, or ability is ready to be replaced?
And, do you have a bunch of kerosene, or ultra pure oil? How long is
your typical need for a backup? Figuring an ounce an hour per lamp, do
you have enough oil?
I have 15 gallons of kerosene and lamps for light. If the electric goes
out. Kero heaters and candles was all I could really get together. I
wasnt thinking much about heat from the lamps. . I just put two downstairs
to see if they give off any heat per hour.
Post by Stormin Mormon
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.
Post by Thomas
I have 5 lamps, 7/8th inch wicks.
When the temp is 30 outside and I burn all 5, my temp rises about 1
degree an hour. This is a 20 by 25 ft room give or take with open
areas to other rooms.
This is interesting. I have a bunch of kero lamps as backups.
Stormin Mormon
2010-10-24 01:24:24 UTC
Permalink
It sounds like you are more prepared than most of
the world's population. I'm sure the lamps put out
a little heat. They do have a flame, after all. How
much heat? Is it useful? I'm sure I'd want to know.

Someday, I may make a practical trying out. Light a
couple oil lamps in the living room. See if there is
enough heat to fight the cold. Be a good test for
one of these days.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.


"DogDiesel" <***@nospam.none> wrote in message news:i9vpht$db9$***@dogdiesel.eternal-september.org...

I have 15 gallons of kerosene and lamps for light.
If the electric goes out. Kero heaters and candles
was all I could really get together.
I wasnt thinking much about heat from the lamps. .
I just put two downstairs to see if they give off any
heat per hour.
DogDiesel
2010-10-24 01:53:08 UTC
Permalink
Theres some heat down stairs. Its usable.
Post by Stormin Mormon
It sounds like you are more prepared than most of
the world's population. I'm sure the lamps put out
a little heat. They do have a flame, after all. How
much heat? Is it useful? I'm sure I'd want to know.
Someday, I may make a practical trying out. Light a
couple oil lamps in the living room. See if there is
enough heat to fight the cold. Be a good test for
one of these days.
.
I have 15 gallons of kerosene and lamps for light.
If the electric goes out. Kero heaters and candles
was all I could really get together.
I wasnt thinking much about heat from the lamps. .
I just put two downstairs to see if they give off any
heat per hour.
DogDiesel
2010-10-24 01:54:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by DogDiesel
Theres some heat down stairs. Its usable.
Now if I can figure out how to not burn the house down. Thats a bit
different.
Post by DogDiesel
Post by Stormin Mormon
It sounds like you are more prepared than most of
the world's population. I'm sure the lamps put out
a little heat. They do have a flame, after all. How
much heat? Is it useful? I'm sure I'd want to know.
Someday, I may make a practical trying out. Light a
couple oil lamps in the living room. See if there is
enough heat to fight the cold. Be a good test for
one of these days.
.
I have 15 gallons of kerosene and lamps for light.
If the electric goes out. Kero heaters and candles
was all I could really get together.
I wasnt thinking much about heat from the lamps. .
I just put two downstairs to see if they give off any
heat per hour.
DogDiesel
2010-10-24 02:44:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by DogDiesel
Post by DogDiesel
Theres some heat down stairs. Its usable.
Now if I can figure out how to not burn the house down. Thats a bit
different.
Post by DogDiesel
Post by Stormin Mormon
It sounds like you are more prepared than most of
the world's population.
I appreciate the support. But actually Im not. I got the technology,
and the head on straight, but implemantation isnt happening. Like id like
it.













I'm sure the lamps put out
Post by DogDiesel
Post by DogDiesel
Post by Stormin Mormon
a little heat. They do have a flame, after all. How
much heat? Is it useful? I'm sure I'd want to know.
Someday, I may make a practical trying out. Light a
couple oil lamps in the living room. See if there is
enough heat to fight the cold. Be a good test for
one of these days.
.
I have 15 gallons of kerosene and lamps for light.
If the electric goes out. Kero heaters and candles
was all I could really get together.
I wasnt thinking much about heat from the lamps. .
I just put two downstairs to see if they give off any
heat per hour.
Stormin Mormon
2010-10-24 12:38:05 UTC
Permalink
There you go, again. Being more prepared, and
humble too. I think the awareness is the #1 thing.
After a man is aware of the need, the other things
start to fall into place. Each day we make decisions,
and yours are pointing in the direction of survival
and emergency prep. Little by little, things will
improve for you.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.
Post by Stormin Mormon
It sounds like you are more prepared than most of
the world's population.
I appreciate the support. But actually Im not. I got
the technology, and the head on straight, but
implemantation isnt happening. Like id like it.
robert bowman
2010-10-24 06:14:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by DogDiesel
Now if I can figure out how to not burn the house down. Thats a bit
different.
Kerosene is relatively safe. There are a couple of old songs about country
people who were used to blowing the kerosene lantern out a night going to
town, staying at a hotel, and blowing out the gas lamp at bedtime.
Stormin Mormon
2010-10-24 12:34:16 UTC
Permalink
For the metal frame "rail road" style lamps. Screw a cup hook into the
ceiling where the beam is. Keeps the lamp out of reach of most pets or
children.

For the glass base "table top" style. Make a sheet metal or wooden
shelf with a big edge around the shelf. So the lamp doesn't slide off
and crash. Put the lamp on the wall with a pie plate behind the lamp.
Like the old days.

Them old time folks had good ideas.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.
Post by DogDiesel
Theres some heat down stairs. Its usable.
Now if I can figure out how to not burn the house down. Thats a bit
different.
robert bowman
2010-10-23 23:03:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stormin Mormon
Is (are) five lamps enough light to walk around, watch TV, etc? My
living room has three lamps. Two table top, and one on a wall bracket.
One or two Alladins would do the job. My experience with kerosene lanterns
that only have a wick and not a mantle suggests you'd better not have a
Golden Retriever as a pet; he might get upset when you keep tripping over
him in the gloom. I'm exaggerating a bit, but they really don't put out
much light. On the plus side, your housekeeping doesn't have to be up to
Martha Stewart standards.

An Alladin isn't cheap, but it is like having a very quiet gas or propane
Coleman lantern. I'm rather surprised the Chinese haven't come up with a
knockoff. One in the price range of the Colemans would be a winner.
Winston_Smith
2010-10-24 01:12:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stormin Mormon
Wick type oil or "kerosene" lamps from Walmart or other places. They
put out some heat. But, how much?
Any idea how to figure out the BTU per hour? My thought is that they
burn about an ounce of oil an hour. More or less. So, on the web some
where has to be the heat content of lamp oil. Figure it out from
there.
If it's enough, then an oil lamp or two or more. Could be used for
heat when the power is off, or the propane tank is empty.
http://www.nooutage.com/fuels.htm 1 gallon kerosene = 135,000 BTU.

Put a measured amount of fuel in your lantern, time the burn, and
there is your BTU/hour for that particular lamp.

If the lamp specifies capacity and burn time you don't even have to
experiment.
Stormin Mormon
2010-10-24 01:27:43 UTC
Permalink
It's been a while, and not sure what I did with my notes. But somehow,
I remember about an ounce (by weight) an hour. I was using a postal
scale for one experiment I did. I was comparing ulta pure versus baby
oil for a test. Interesting enough, baby oil does reasonably well in
wick lamps.

Mineral spirits paint thinner did great for light, but that stuff is
dangerous. Too volitale. The tank on some lamps warms up, and then the
lamp goes critical, and goes super nova. Might be OK in a lamp where
the base stays cool.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.


"Winston_Smith" <***@bogus.net> wrote in message news:***@4ax.com...


http://www.nooutage.com/fuels.htm 1 gallon kerosene = 135,000 BTU.

Put a measured amount of fuel in your lantern, time the burn, and
there is your BTU/hour for that particular lamp.

If the lamp specifies capacity and burn time you don't even have to
experiment.
Winston_Smith
2010-10-24 02:33:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stormin Mormon
It's been a while, and not sure what I did with my notes. But somehow,
I remember about an ounce (by weight) an hour. I was using a postal
scale for one experiment I did. I was comparing ulta pure versus baby
oil for a test. Interesting enough, baby oil does reasonably well in
wick lamps.
Mineral spirits paint thinner did great for light, but that stuff is
dangerous. Too volitale. The tank on some lamps warms up, and then the
lamp goes critical, and goes super nova. Might be OK in a lamp where
the base stays cool.
135,000 BTU/gallon / 128 oz/gallon = 1,055 BTU/ounce.

If you burn an ounce/hour, it's 1,055 BTU/hr. That's reasonably
between a single candle flame produces 850 BTU/hour and a single
natural gas mantle produces 2,125 BTU/hour
Winston_Smith
2010-10-24 02:24:06 UTC
Permalink
"Stormin Mormon" <cayoung61**spamblock##@hotmail.com> wrote:

From my now extinct web page:

Heat sources:
A human body produces at least 240 BTU/hour
Basal metabolism = 1 kcal/min * 60 min/hr
= 60kcal/hour * 4 BTU/kcal = 240 BTU/hr

A single candle flame produces 850 BTU/hour

A single natural gas mantle produces 2,125 BTU/hour

1 gallon of Natural Gas contains 100,000 BTU

1 gallon of Propane contains 90,000 BTU

An electric heater or blanket produces 3.4 BTU/Watt
DogDiesel
2010-10-24 02:52:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Winston_Smith
A human body produces at least 240 BTU/hour
Basal metabolism = 1 kcal/min * 60 min/hr
= 60kcal/hour * 4 BTU/kcal = 240 BTU/hr
A single candle flame produces 850 BTU/hour
A single natural gas mantle produces 2,125 BTU/hour
1 gallon of Natural Gas contains 100,000 BTU
1 gallon of Propane contains 90,000 BTU
An electric heater or blanket produces 3.4 BTU/Watt
So the problem as I see it. Is our houses / apartments suck. And we cant
keep the heat in. And it would cost about $500,000 to build a 1200 foot
job, That all the heat stays in.
Winston_Smith
2010-10-24 04:26:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by DogDiesel
Post by Winston_Smith
A human body produces at least 240 BTU/hour
Basal metabolism = 1 kcal/min * 60 min/hr
= 60kcal/hour * 4 BTU/kcal = 240 BTU/hr
A single candle flame produces 850 BTU/hour
A single natural gas mantle produces 2,125 BTU/hour
1 gallon of Natural Gas contains 100,000 BTU
1 gallon of Propane contains 90,000 BTU
An electric heater or blanket produces 3.4 BTU/Watt
So the problem as I see it. Is our houses / apartments suck. And we cant
keep the heat in. And it would cost about $500,000 to build a 1200 foot
job, That all the heat stays in.
The formula was - what does it cost, as a lump sum, for better
insulation vs. what does it cost, paid month by month over years, for
more fuel.

Until perhaps a decade ago, cheap insulation and pay as you go fuel
costs won the day. It still does to most mass builders. I doubt you
will find really good insulation on anything that wasn't built or
upgraded on a one of a kind custom basis.
robert bowman
2010-10-24 06:17:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Winston_Smith
Until perhaps a decade ago, cheap insulation and pay as you go fuel
costs won the day.  It still does to most mass builders.  I doubt you
will find really good insulation on anything that wasn't built or
upgraded on a one of a kind custom basis.
Back in the seventies, there were problems with some of the flat roofs when
people started insulating. They were designed to lose enough heat to melt
the snow off and not to take the full snow load.
DogDiesel
2010-10-24 06:37:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by robert bowman
Post by Winston_Smith
Until perhaps a decade ago, cheap insulation and pay as you go fuel
costs won the day. It still does to most mass builders. I doubt you
will find really good insulation on anything that wasn't built or
upgraded on a one of a kind custom basis.
Back in the seventies, there were problems with some of the flat roofs when
people started insulating. They were designed to lose enough heat to melt
the snow off and not to take the full snow load.
Good one.
h***@aol.com
2010-10-24 12:19:04 UTC
Permalink
This post might be inappropriate. Click to display it.
Stormin Mormon
2010-10-24 12:39:03 UTC
Permalink
No building is totally heat or cold retaining. But, we can do little
things to help out. My goal is to outlast my neighbors, not live
forever.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.


"DogDiesel" <***@nospam.none> wrote in message news:ia0719$lpk$***@dogdiesel.eternal-september.org...

So the problem as I see it. Is our houses / apartments suck. And we
cant
keep the heat in. And it would cost about $500,000 to build a 1200
foot
job, That all the heat stays in.
Stormin Mormon
2010-10-24 12:35:36 UTC
Permalink
Where do you buy a gallon of natural gas? Can you bring it home in a
bucket, and save the cost of a container?
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.


"Winston_Smith" <***@bogus.net> wrote in message news:***@4ax.com...
"Stormin Mormon" <cayoung61**spamblock##@hotmail.com> wrote:

From my now extinct web page:

Heat sources:
A human body produces at least 240 BTU/hour
Basal metabolism = 1 kcal/min * 60 min/hr
= 60kcal/hour * 4 BTU/kcal = 240 BTU/hr

A single candle flame produces 850 BTU/hour

A single natural gas mantle produces 2,125 BTU/hour

1 gallon of Natural Gas contains 100,000 BTU

1 gallon of Propane contains 90,000 BTU

An electric heater or blanket produces 3.4 BTU/Watt
Winston_Smith
2010-10-28 03:14:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stormin Mormon
Where do you buy a gallon of natural gas? Can you bring it home in a
bucket, and save the cost of a container?
I'm not sure you are serious or pulling my leg, so I'll explain it.

Just like propane, natural gas is only a gas at atmospheric pressures.
But it can be compressed - put under pressure with a pump. Then it
becomes a liquid and is stored in tanks. As in LNG, liquefied natural
gas.

The generic propane tank for the barbeque was called a 5 pound tank
when I lived in NJ. They put your empty tank on a scale and made it
five pounds heavier.

In Aridzona, they sell it by the liquid gallon as they pump it from
their pressurized tank into your pressurized tank.

Priced by the pound or by the gallon it costs the same to get it
filled.
Stormin Mormon
2010-10-28 13:56:06 UTC
Permalink
I've forgotten the context of my question. Someone was mentioning
using NG for lights.

I've been a furnace installer for six years, and most of that was
working with NG. I've also worked with refrigerants for 15 years, and
much of that is similar to handling propane. Been using propane in
various forms for longer than refrigerants.

It's better to explain something, than leave other person at risk of
doing something dangerous. Now, where did I leave my LPG bucket.....
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.
Post by Stormin Mormon
Where do you buy a gallon of natural gas? Can you bring it home in a
bucket, and save the cost of a container?
I'm not sure you are serious or pulling my leg, so I'll explain it.

Just like propane, natural gas is only a gas at atmospheric pressures.
But it can be compressed - put under pressure with a pump. Then it
becomes a liquid and is stored in tanks. As in LNG, liquefied natural
gas.

The generic propane tank for the barbeque was called a 5 pound tank
when I lived in NJ. They put your empty tank on a scale and made it
five pounds heavier.

In Aridzona, they sell it by the liquid gallon as they pump it from
their pressurized tank into your pressurized tank.

Priced by the pound or by the gallon it costs the same to get it
filled.
Stormin Mormon
2010-10-28 16:17:46 UTC
Permalink
Had to go back a ways. Now, the memory returns. You mention a gallon
of natural gas. I've been around a while, and I've never heard NG
supplied, described, or specified "by gallon". Thus, my question where
to buy a gallon of NG.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.


"Stormin Mormon" <cayoung61**spamblock##@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:ia198n$5po$***@news.eternal-september.org...
Where do you buy a gallon of natural gas? Can you bring it home in a
bucket, and save the cost of a container?
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.


"Winston_Smith" <***@bogus.net> wrote in message news:***@4ax.com...
"Stormin Mormon" <cayoung61**spamblock##@hotmail.com> wrote:

From my now extinct web page:

Heat sources:
A human body produces at least 240 BTU/hour
Basal metabolism = 1 kcal/min * 60 min/hr
= 60kcal/hour * 4 BTU/kcal = 240 BTU/hr

A single candle flame produces 850 BTU/hour

A single natural gas mantle produces 2,125 BTU/hour

1 gallon of Natural Gas contains 100,000 BTU

1 gallon of Propane contains 90,000 BTU

An electric heater or blanket produces 3.4 BTU/Watt
DogDiesel
2010-10-24 08:03:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stormin Mormon
Wick type oil or "kerosene" lamps from Walmart or other places. They
put out some heat. But, how much?
Any idea how to figure out the BTU per hour? My thought is that they
burn about an ounce of oil an hour. More or less. So, on the web some
where has to be the heat content of lamp oil. Figure it out from
there.
If it's enough, then an oil lamp or two or more. Could be used for
heat when the power is off, or the propane tank is empty.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.
I've been running my big one for about 6 hours. It looks like a 5/8ths or
3/4 wick I guess. Its 64F in here and its raised it a bit. 11 by 11 room.
I don't know how much kero is in it but I bet its a quart. and its down
about a 15% . I'm pretty sure if I had this in a smaller closed up space
like a car or van. It would help if it was about 55 or 60F. Certainly
could cook with it. Its not going to do anything if its cold. 1000 btus
isn't even good enough for a sleeping bag if its freezing out.

Maybe this in a sealed up mattress Tent might be usable.

It would be appreciated if I was already prepared to deal with the cold by
clothes and shelter and sleeping bags and had no heat. It could be a hand
warmer or foot warmer . Or rig a sleeping bag up to get some heat deflected
into it.
DogDiesel
2010-10-26 04:03:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by DogDiesel
Post by Stormin Mormon
Wick type oil or "kerosene" lamps from Walmart or other places. They
put out some heat. But, how much?
Any idea how to figure out the BTU per hour? My thought is that they
burn about an ounce of oil an hour. More or less. So, on the web some
where has to be the heat content of lamp oil. Figure it out from
there.
If it's enough, then an oil lamp or two or more. Could be used for
heat when the power is off, or the propane tank is empty.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.
I've been running my big one for about 6 hours. It looks like a 5/8ths
or 3/4 wick I guess. Its 64F in here and its raised it a bit. 11 by 11
room. I don't know how much kero is in it but I bet its a quart. and its
down about a 15% . I'm pretty sure if I had this in a smaller closed up
space like a car or van. It would help if it was about 55 or 60F.
Certainly could cook with it. Its not going to do anything if its cold.
1000 btus isn't even good enough for a sleeping bag if its freezing out.
Maybe this in a sealed up mattress Tent might be usable.
It would be appreciated if I was already prepared to deal with the cold by
clothes and shelter and sleeping bags and had no heat. It could be a
hand warmer or foot warmer . Or rig a sleeping bag up to get some heat
deflected into it.
\
My test was flawed. I had an open window downstairs.

It would of brought the temp up if the window was closed.
Alan Erskine
2010-10-28 12:59:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stormin Mormon
Wick type oil or "kerosene" lamps from Walmart or other places. They
put out some heat. But, how much?
Any idea how to figure out the BTU per hour? My thought is that they
burn about an ounce of oil an hour. More or less. So, on the web some
where has to be the heat content of lamp oil. Figure it out from
there.
If it's enough, then an oil lamp or two or more. Could be used for
heat when the power is off, or the propane tank is empty.
You've got more to consider than heat output. They also produce CO -
deadly stuff. Kero heaters should be vented outside (like all
hydrocarbon/wood heaters).

Yes, you get heat and light, but you die.
Stormin Mormon
2010-10-28 14:44:26 UTC
Permalink
Thanks. I'll be collecting my death benefits, now. I didn't know I was
dead. I've got a whole bunch of friends who are dead, also.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.


"Alan Erskine" <***@bigpond.com> wrote in message news:Fseyo.698$***@viwinnwfe02.internal.bigpond.com...

You've got more to consider than heat output. They also produce CO -
deadly stuff. Kero heaters should be vented outside (like all
hydrocarbon/wood heaters).

Yes, you get heat and light, but you die.
Alan Erskine
2010-10-29 04:03:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stormin Mormon
Thanks. I'll be collecting my death benefits, now. I didn't know I was
dead. I've got a whole bunch of friends who are dead, also.
Sarcasm noted.

However, it's quite true and very dangerous to think of an oil lamp as a
source of heat. Any combustion device (whether oil, gas or solid fuel)
will consume oxygen. If that oxygen comes from within a confined space
and isn't replaced immediately, it may be too late.

Symptoms of CO poisoning include blurred vision and headache to start
with. Later, it becomes difficult to make rational decisions; then coma
and then death.

I just want you to be careful.
Stormin Mormon
2010-10-29 13:10:11 UTC
Permalink
Of course, some people live in buildings which have plenty of air
leaks, and the gas buildup is less of a concern.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.


"Alan Erskine" <***@bigpond.com> wrote in message news:GIryo.761$***@viwinnwfe01.internal.bigpond.com...

However, it's quite true and very dangerous to think of an oil lamp as
a
source of heat. Any combustion device (whether oil, gas or solid
fuel)
will consume oxygen. If that oxygen comes from within a confined
space
and isn't replaced immediately, it may be too late.

Symptoms of CO poisoning include blurred vision and headache to start
with. Later, it becomes difficult to make rational decisions; then
coma
and then death.

I just want you to be careful.
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